Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, graduate of the WebMBA program at Georgia College

How do you juggle your own medical practice while attempting to further your business career by getting an MBA? Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, an acclaimed oral surgeon, did just that. This week he talks with guest host Jon Waterhouse about why it’s important for physicians who run their own practice to have an MBA, the pros and cons of getting an online MBA, and much more.

Transcript of Show

Announcer: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz, on News 95.5, and AM 750. WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Exploring Atlanta’s business leaders, inspiring stories, lessons learned and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: 00:26
Yes, it’s time to settle in for an hour of business talk here on WSB.

Welcome to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, filling in for Richard Lenz.

Now, as you know, many business professionals contemplate going back to school and acquiring an MBA, taking things to the next level.

Well, our special guest this week is an acclaimed oral surgeon who operates his own practice, and he decided to do just that. Here to tell us about how he juggled his profession with graduate school, the pros and cons of getting an online MBA, and much more, is Dr. Joseph Ducksworth.

He’s a private practice oral and maxillofacial surgeon at The Oral, Facial and Implant Surgery Center in South Forsyth.

Dr. Ducksworth’s specialties include dental implants, wisdom teeth removal, bone grafting, oral pathology, facial trauma, and more. And in 2018, he graduated from the Georgia College WebMBA program. Dr. Ducksworth, welcome to the show.

Dr. Ducksworth: 01:41
Thank you, Jon for that, a warm introduction. I certainly appreciate you inviting me out today, and I look forward to this interview.

Jon Waterhouse: 01:49
Absolutely. So, tell us a little bit about your day-to-day as an oral surgeon. What goes into your everyday lifestyle in your profession?

Dr. Ducksworth: 01:58
Being an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, our daily lifestyle, or daily routine, involves a wisdom teeth extractions. Most people know an oral surgeon is the person that performs wisdom teeth extractions under sedation, or by the patient going to sleep.

But we also do additional things, such as dental implants. As you mentioned, we do bone grafting. We’re also the doctors that are responsible for diagnosing and treating different types of cysts, tumors, cancer, and a multitude of other things that are involved in the oral cavity, as well as the maxillofacial region.

Jon Waterhouse: 02:37
So, in addition to doing all of this, all this surgery, all these different aspects of your job, you run the practice.

Dr. Ducksworth: 02:43
Yes, I do run to practice. It is a private practice, oral and maxillofacial surgery practice, as you mentioned. I do run the practice. I have a practice manager there, that assists in running the practice, but yes, I am primarily responsible for running the practice.

Jon Waterhouse: 02:57
What made you want to go back and get MBA?

Dr. Ducksworth: 02:59
Well, I’ve always been interested in having my own business, hence having an oral and maxillofacial surgery practice.

I also have an interest in some different entrepreneurship ventures that I plan to do in the future. And I look forward to the MBA helping me with those future endeavors, but also helping me have a different outlook on the current practice that I run, and the business activities that go on from day to day.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:28
So let’s talk about that outlook, and how it’s changed since you received your WebMBA from Georgia College.

Dr. Ducksworth: 03:34
Since obtaining the WebMBA from Georgia College, I’ve been able to have a different conversation with my accountant, a different conversation with my IT person, my marketing coordinator, on a daily basis, as well as the office manager and the staff at The Oral, Facial and Implant Surgery Center.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:54
So let’s talk about the program itself, and your experiences there. What are some of the biggest business lessons you’ve learned since getting your MBA?

Dr. Ducksworth: 04:03
So I would have to say the biggest business lesson that I learned is the ability to be able to evaluate and analyze situations differently. Coming from a math and science background, as most healthcare professionals do, we’re taught to look at situations pretty much as in black and white, as either right or wrong.

But after obtaining the MBA, it allows me to explore some of those gray areas that are necessary to run a successful business, and to also explore different business ventures in the future.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:38
Folks, if you’re just tuning into Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, we’re talking with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, who is a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA program. So, Dr. Ducksworth, why did you choose Georgia College’s WebMBA?

Dr. Ducksworth: 04:58
I chose the Georgia College WebMBA program due to the flexibility that the program offered. The program is fully accredited. It has a great review. It is constantly ranked amongst the top programs, not only in Georgia, but also in the US, year after year.

For example, the program is one of the best online programs, and counting five years in a row. This is one of the 12 best business schools ranked by CEO Magazine. And also, it’s one of the 10 online programs in the South, as well as the top 25 public online MBA programs, nationally.

Jon Waterhouse: 05:37
And from what I’ve heard, Georgia College’s WebMBA is also known for its affordability. Did that play a part in your decision?

Dr. Ducksworth: 05:44
Why, certainly, yes. The Georgia College WebMBA program, the affordability … to be able to obtain an MBA program for approximately $20,000 is certainly favorable, as far as looking at any program, especially as an accredited program that it is.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:01
And also, GRE waivers are offered for Georgia College’s WebMBA. Did you opt for one?

Dr. Ducksworth: 06:06
Ah, yes. Having an advanced degree, they do give you the option to waiver the GRE, or the GMAT. In my particular case, having an advanced degree already, was an option that I did take.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:20
Folks, if you’re just tuning in, you’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA program.

He’s talking about what it was like to go back to school in the midst of his career. Now, Dr. Ducksworth, what are the pros and cons of an online degree?

Dr. Ducksworth: 06:48
So, the pros and cons. First I’ll start with the pros. The pros of obtaining an online degree is the flexibility that the program offers. The tuition, that we discussed previously, was definitely one of the pros of obtaining an online degree through Georgia College and the WebMBA program.

The cons, that I will say, are are minimal, but I will say that it requires self-discipline. If you’re not an individual that has self-discipline and time management, that will become a con for you. It can be an isolating experience if you’re not willing to be actively involved in your team, as well as the projects that are presented throughout the course.

Jon Waterhouse: 07:35
You were talking about the discipline of studying and participating in a WebMBA, and here you are running a practice. Not only running a practice, but also a professional surgeon, an oral surgeon. You’re out there working day to day. How did you juggle that time? How did you make time for the WebMBA?

Dr. Ducksworth: 07:54
For me, what I did, I looked at things that I could adjust, things that I could not necessarily cut out of my daily routine. And what I mean by things that, it just means social activities.

For example, I knew I couldn’t cut out my work schedule, my after-work schedule, my lifestyle with my family. I know certain things could not be cut out, but there are certain social things that could be modified.

For example, if you’re a person that likes to play golf on Sunday afternoons, you might have to modify your golf schedule for the program. That’s how I was able to adjust. I would say to anyone who’s looking to explore the opportunity of doing a WebMBA program, you look at your life, you make a calendar of your work schedule, you make a calendar of your after-work schedule, your lifestyle, and then you look at things that you can adjust accordingly. And that’s going to help out a lot with your time management strategy as far as the obtaining a WebMBA.

Jon Waterhouse: 08:52
And what was your study strategy like, Dr. Ducksworth? After a long day at work, did you come home and study? Did you get up early in the morning and do your coursework?

Dr. Ducksworth: 09:01
Very good. So, it varied. It varied according to what was going on at the time, not only at work but after work.

For me, what worked best for me was to study after work, approximately one to two hours per day. I averaged probably 10 to 12 hours per week, I would say. Some weeks that would vary. It might be five hours this week, maybe 20 hours next week. But what worked best for me was to stay ahead, to help me stay ahead, was to study daily, a little bit after work, after the kids and everybody’s gone to bed, things like that. So, that’s what helped me best.

And also, studying on Saturday mornings before it was time for the kids’ activities, and things of that nature.

Jon Waterhouse: 09:45
And I would imagine the consistency of studying every day helped keep you on your toes as you were continuing your classwork.

Dr. Ducksworth: 09:53
Certainly. Certainly, the consistency of studying everyday helps you stay ahead in your studies, and it also keeps you abreast of the things that you’re going to be reviewing with your group when you meet with the group. It’s also going to help you be prepared for the exams better. And also, the end of the year capstone that many of us are aware of.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:15
Folks. You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, filling in for Richard Lenz. And this week we’re chatting with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA program.

He’s telling us all about that experience, and what it was like, in the midst of his career, going back to school to attain that WebMBA.

And we’re going to learn more about it just after the break. Don’t go anyplace.

Richard Lenz: 10:45
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:17
We’re back some more on this week’s Lenz on Business, I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse.

Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

And this week on Lenz on Business, we’re talking with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth. He’s a private practice oral and maxillofacial surgeon at The Oral, Facial and Implant Surgery Center in South Forsyth. And Dr. Ducksworth’s specialties include dental implants, wisdom teeth removal, bone grafting, oral pathology, facial trauma, and more.

But in addition to all of that, he runs his own practice. In 2018, he graduated from the Georgia College WebMBA program to add to his business savvy. And Dr. Ducksworth, we were talking earlier about the whole WebMBA experience at Georgia College. Did you have a specific favorite class that really spoke to you?

Dr. Ducksworth: 12:28
Yeah, the class that really spoke to me was the entrepreneurship class, as well as the marketing class, because those things really hit home for me about what goes on in my daily practice, and some of the future business ventures that I plan to pursue.

So those two classes, for me, were the favorite classes, if you were to pick favorites. But the program entirely as a whole, putting everything together, certainly was instrumental in changing my way of thinking and analyzing situations.

Jon Waterhouse: 12:58
Absolutely. And you were talking earlier, before the break, that in addition to day-to-day as an oral surgeon running your own practice, you also have that entrepreneurial spirit. You have a few other business ideas that you have on the table. Anything that you can talk about today?

Dr. Ducksworth: 13:15
Well, for example, the entrepreneurship class that I just talked about, what we were able to do was to write a business plan for my second practice, and additional practices moving forward. So that is one arm of the entrepreneurship thing that I’m exploring.

As a matter of fact, the business plan that we wrote, my team wrote, is going to be used this year to open the second practice, under The Oral, Facial and Implant Surgery Center umbrella.

So that was a huge thing for me, because now, the things that I would typically have paid for in the past, we were able to do those things in the program. Through this class, we were able to write the business plan, formulate it, have it evaluated by the instructor, have different eyes on it. So that was the huge thing right there for me.

Jon Waterhouse: 14:03
That’s incredible. I mean, practicality right there.

Dr. Ducksworth: 14:05
Right, exactly. And that is one of the great things I will say about the program, is that having a diverse group of team members, each one of us, at some point throughout this program, were able to say, “Hey, that applies to me. We just had that situation at work,” or, “This situation is coming up at work.” That’s the great thing about the program. You can take the … the program takes real-life situations, and you’re able to implement what you learned into that.

Jon Waterhouse: 14:34
And I want to talk a little bit later about the group involvement, and that collaboration at Georgia College’s WebMBA program, which we’ll save that for for just a few moments.

But folks, if you’re just tuning into the program, we’re chatting with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, who’s a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA program.

Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse.

Stick around, we have more to explore in this week’s episode, all about going back to school and grabbing an MBA, more specifically, Georgia College’s WebMBA Lenz on Business, WSB. We’ll see you in just a few moments.

Richard Lenz: 15:22
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:50
Welcome back to Lenz on Business here on WSB. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

And this week we’re talking with someone who knows all about the Georgia College WebMBA. This is Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, here in the studio with us. He’s a private practice oral surgeon at The Oral, Facial and Implant Surgery Center in South Forsyth.

And in 2018, he graduated from the Georgia College WebMBA program. Now, Dr. Ducksworth, we were talking earlier about the collaboration that you had with other students during the Georgia College WebMBA program.

Now, on the outside, some people might think that you might be on an island when you’re participating in an online program. Can you tell us a little bit more about the cohort and group-based aspects of the program?

Dr. Ducksworth: 16:59
Yes. So, the Georgia WebMBA program is designed to be a all-online program. It’s interactive with your group or your team members throughout the five-term course of the program.

So, what happens is, you interact with your team members on a weekly basis. It is entirely up to the team how often you meet, or how often you interact. Like some semester, we may meet once a week, and some semesters, just depending on the coursework or what’s required, we might meet twice a week. It just all depends.

But the collaboration that you will form with your team members is instrumental in moving you and yourself forward. There is one face-to-face meeting that you will have, and that is at the orientation. That’s when you meet your team members. That is the only required face-to-face meeting that you will have.

But at that meeting, you will be able to meet the team members, find out each other’s backgrounds, find out what each other’s strengths and weaknesses are, which will be helpful as you move forward through the program.

The collaboration that you have, it can be a face-to-face, online, face-to-face meeting. It can be a conference call, however you and your team decide to set it up.

I will say that the collaboration is very instrumental, and knowing who is strong in which areas, who likes certain activities, or who likes certain tasks, because as you move forward through the program, that will be instrumental for you as well as the team in moving forward.

Jon Waterhouse: 18:36
Now, Dr. Ducksworth, you were talking earlier about one of the projects that you were working on as you were undergoing your WebMBA through Georgia College, and that was an entrepreneurial class and you were putting together a business plan, and you were collaborating with your fellow students. Did you see the diversity of backgrounds? Did that benefit that particular project?

Dr. Ducksworth: 19:02
Of course. The diverse backgrounds, because as I mentioned earlier, as one that’s coming from a math and science background, you have a tendency to look at things in black and white, and we know how we’ve honed our craft over the years. When we go to medical school, dental school, we’re taught how to hone in on your craft, but the business side is all the things that we don’t get.

So having a cohort, or a cohort as well as a team of students that had diverse backgrounds, they were able to implement and have questions about things that maybe I would not have thought about in writing the business plan on my own, initially.

Jon Waterhouse: 19:39
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA program.

Now, in addition to collaborating with other students, you also had the opportunity to receive support from the Georgia College WebMBA staff. Can you talk about the support they provided along the way? And what sort of access you had to folks in that capacity?

Dr. Ducksworth: 20:11
So the staff at Georgia College is excellent, in my opinion. From the beginning, from my initial inquiry about obtaining the WebMBA, Ms. Hansen and Ms. Moseley were great. Throughout the program, they were always accessible. As far as if I had an inquiry or about any situation that came up, they were always on top of it.

Most responses are instant. If not instant, certainly with within a 24-hour time period they’re going to get solutions to your inquiry, if there is any.

But as far as the staff goes, the staff was excellent, in my opinion.

Jon Waterhouse: 20:48
And so you participated in the classes in your own time? How does that work?

Dr. Ducksworth: 20:53
Great. So, yes. You will participate in the classes on your own, but you will also participate in the classes as part of your group. There will be individual projects that you will pursue and have to complete, and there will be group projects that you will have to pursue and complete as well.

Jon Waterhouse: 21:09
You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week on the program, we’ve been talking with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth. He’s a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA program, and managed to obtain that degree while working full-time as an oral surgeon, and managing his own practice in South Forsyth.

His practice is The Oral, Facial and Implant Surgery Center.

Now, Dr. Ducksworth, let’s talk a little bit about physicians who run their own practices. Would you suggest that all physicians who run their own practices go back and get an MBA to help enhance their business?

Dr. Ducksworth: 21:50
I certainly would suggest it to all physicians who have their own practice. Being that, when we’re in medical school, we’re in dental school, or professional school, we do not get the business side of running a practice. We get the input of how to hone in on your craft, how to perform your procedures at the top level.

But the business side, we do not get that. We probably get probably one business class, on average, amongst different schools, about running your own business, but nothing like what is offered through the WebMBA.

So, in that regards I would certainly suggest it. You cannot go wrong with it. It certainly changes your way of analyzing and evaluating situations on a daily basis as far as running your business.

Jon Waterhouse: 22:39
And, as far as that day-to-day of running your business, since graduation, can you give us some other ways, some of the practical ways that you’ve used your WebMBA training since graduation?

Dr. Ducksworth: 22:51
Some other practical ways that I’ve used my WebMBA in my daily practice. As I mentioned earlier, my marketing, for example. I have a different outlook as far as my marketing goals, and I can have a different conversation with my marketing coordinator about different things that I maybe would not have thought about if I would not have obtained a MBA.

As far as my accounting goes, the accounting, I … things that I understood before, I just have a further understanding, and a more in-depth knowledge about those things right now, as well.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:25
And I’m sure you have a greater appreciation for folks who do those jobs on a daily basis.

Dr. Ducksworth: 23:30
Of course, of course. Definitely. Even thinking about my IT person, thing is, before, I would just say, “I just want it to work.” Now I understand a little bit more about what I want to work, instead of just, “I want it to work.”

So, yes, I do have a further appreciation and understanding for those people that do it on a daily basis.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:49
And I imagine, having a better understanding of what other people are doing within your practice also would help you manage the practice better, logistically. Just understanding the timeframes, and how long it would take someone to undertake a specific project.

Dr. Ducksworth: 24:04
Yes, definitely. The WebMBA provides you the opportunity to learn and become more aware of things that are essential in running a business, things that are essential, and the logistics, as you mentioned of a daily … No matter if it’s a small practice, or a small business such as mine, or a corporation, being that the lifelike examples that we are exposed to in the program, we are exposed to examples of small businesses as well as running a large Corporation. That is a great thing about the WebMBA.

Jon Waterhouse: 24:37
Now you were talking about approaching things from the viewpoint of a physician. Do you feel like being a physician lends itself to adapting to the business mindset? Or is that something that you had to really work hard towards?

Dr. Ducksworth: 24:52
I think it depends on your mindset. I think that most physicians, when we first come out of our training, it probably is a little bit harder for us to adapt because we’ve been trained to think black or white. It’s either right or wrong. Either the procedure’s completed, or it’s not. You’re doing right or wrong.

And so I think, as you become a little more seasoned in your business, the mindset does open up, and you start to look at, hey, is there a different way that I maybe should be looking at business, versus the surgical procedures or the medical procedures that I’m performing on a daily basis? So, certainly, I think that an instrumental.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:31
You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s. J Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse.

This week, we’re talking with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA program.

Now, Dr. Ducksworth, since obtaining your WebMBA, has this changed the way that you approach your day-to-day?

Dr. Ducksworth: 25:53
I would say so. From, for example, running the practice on a daily, day-to-day basis, I think differently in the aspect of it’s a business and surgery versus previously, I just thought surgery, and let everyone else deal with business. You have your office manager, have you marketing person.

But now I see it as a business and surgical practice versus a surgical practice, that’s what I always would say, “It’s a surgical practice.” So now I see it as being a business-minded practice as well.

Jon Waterhouse: 26:25
You’re listening to Lenz on Business, and this week we’re chatting with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth, that’s talking all about his experience graduating from Georgia College’s WebMBA program. And don’t forget, folks, marketing matters, and Lenz knows marketing.

From brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing, public relations. Think smart. Think creative. Think Lenz.

Learn more at lenzmarketing.com. This is Jon Waterhouse here on Lenz on Business, WSB. Stick around for more.

Richard Lenz: 27:02
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:33
You’re locked into Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse.

And this week, we’ve been talking with Dr. Joseph Ducksworth. He’s a private practice oral surgeon at The Oral, Facial and Implant Surgery Center in South Forsyth, and in 2018, he graduated from the Georgia College WebMBA program, something he’s using to enhance his business.

Now Dr. Ducksworth, let’s talk a little bit about any advice you might give to someone who is interested in going back to school, specifically obtaining the Georgia College WebMBA. You talked a little bit about it earlier. If you can expand on that, that would be great.

Dr. Ducksworth: 28:19
For someone that’s considering going back to school, and have a busy lifestyle, a busy work schedule, I would say, look at your schedule and determine a time management system that’s going to work for you.

For example, you would have to look at just, make out a schedule, look at the things that you could and could not rearrange in your daily lifestyle, or in your daily schedule. There are things that will come up throughout the course of the program that you will not be able to adjust, but you will find yourself adjusting. I don’t know if that makes sense, but what I’m saying is, you will have to … things will come up throughout the program that you will say, “I have to … I can’t adjust work, but I need to adjust something else in my daily routine, or my daily schedule, daily life that’s going on.”

Jon Waterhouse: 29:15
Right. Life happens.

Dr. Ducksworth: 29:16
Life happens. There we go. Yeah, life happens.

For example, someone in your group might be a pregnant, they might be going to having the baby. Those things, those type of life things happen. When that person has to go out for maternity leave, those kinds of things are part of that life happenings.

So you have to … reason why I’m saying that time management becomes so important, because you need to have something where you can stay ahead. So, when that life event happens, you will be already ahead. The instructors are usually pretty understanding with those things, and if you’re already ahead, they’re okay with opening up exams. They’re okay with opening up coursework and things like that, if you are ahead. So that’s why that time management becomes so important for you.

If you’re a person that’s isolated and staying alone, and then life happens, it becomes more of a difficult situation to adjust accordingly.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:10
Now, I understand you’re married, you’re a parent, and life certainly happens in fatherhood. Can you talk a little bit about how you juggled the parental lifestyle with your Georgia College WebMBA Studies?

Dr. Ducksworth: 30:22
Right. Well, so, what I think is the best thing for someone who is married and has kids, is to get everyone onboard, or get everyone involved with what you’re doing.

For example, I have a 16-year-old son who plays travel basketball. I have a 13-year-old boy and girl twins. One of them plays travel soccer, the other one does competitive gymnastics. What I’m saying is, we all supported each other, and they knew that I was doing my WebMBA program, and so they were just as much a part of it as I was.

They were looking forward to my graduation, they were looking forward to seeing me complete the program. I would say, just get everyone involved and on the same page.

Jon Waterhouse: 31:02
Well, Dr. Ducksworth, thank you so much for joining us today and talking all about the Georgia College WebMBA program.

Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com.

And Bentley Media, North Georgia’s fastest-growing film and video production company. Learn more at weonlyfilmeverything.com.

And make sure and check out our website for our library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s lenzonbusiness.com.

Lenz on Businesses is presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, filling in for Richard Lenz. Come see us next week.

Richard Lenz: 31:56
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Sarah Rose Harrill, graduate of the WebMBA program at Georgia College

This week’s special guest saw value in getting an MBA and decided go back to school in the midst of her career. However, as we all know, life happens. While juggling a job and Georgia College’s WebMBA program, Sarah learned her husband was diagnosed with cancer. Despite the challenges, she made it work. Sarah Rose shares her personal and WebMBA experiences with guest host Jon Waterhouse.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Exploring Atlanta’s business leaders’ inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success. (singing)

Jon Waterhouse: 00:26
It’s time for Business Talk on WSB. Welcome to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, filling in for Richard Lenz. Our special guest this week saw great value in getting an MBA and decided to go back to school in the midst of her career, but as we all know life happens and while juggling a job and an online degree, her husband was diagnosed with cancer. Despite the challenges, she made it work. Please welcome, Sarah Rose, to Lenz on Business this week. Hey, Sarah, how are you doing?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 01:05
I’m doing great, Jon. Thank you so much for having me today.

Jon Waterhouse: 01:08
Well, thanks so much for coming in. In 2018, she completed her master’s degree in Business Administration through the WebMBA Program at Georgia College. Sarah Rose has used this degree to advance her career as a healthcare administrator at Emory Healthcare. Also, in 2018, Sarah Rose began Emory’s management development program. This three to five-year program shapes future leaders of Emory Healthcare by providing mentorship, exposure, hands-on project experience, management, and leadership opportunities, and a strong professional network.

Well, Sarah Rose, great to see you today. Thank you again for coming into the WSB studios. First, tell us a little bit about what made you want to go back to school and what impact did you see in getting an MBA would have on your career?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 02:02
Yeah. Absolutely. I finished my bachelor’s degree in 2014. I actually studied exercise science and kinesiology. I knew I wanted to be in the healthcare space, but I wasn’t sure in exactly what capacity as most 22-year-olds are still figuring it out at that point in time. I started working at Emory and I determined that I really had a passion and a drive for the healthcare administration side of the business as opposed to the clinical side so was looking at what I could do to bolster my bachelor’s degree, which was obviously much more leaning in the clinical direction than the administration direction.

I determined that I wanted to look for a master’s program, either an MHA or an MBA, ended up deciding that the MBA was the better fit for me personally. I’m married to an entrepreneur, so it was kind of a, “Hey, this can work for my career but also work for my family.” I was looking at different MBA programs, found the Georgia WebMBA Program, which is accelerated, something you can do while you’re working full time. Academically rigorous because that was important to me.

Then, what to eyes did appear, but Georgia College was one of the universities that participated in this program, and after getting my bachelor’s degree there, I felt a connection to that university, in particular, and it just felt like the natural next step for me. The Georgia College team has … I just can’t say enough good things about the support they provide to the students and to the families.

I called Lynn Hanson one afternoon, I think at 5:30 and fully expected to get a call back maybe the next week, but she called me back 10 minutes later and already knew, “Hey, I saw you went here for undergrad. Let’s talk about that. How can I help you? What can we do to make this an easy experience?” It all fell together perfectly.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:11
Georgia College has great national rankings. In fact, collegechoice.net ranks it as the number two best online college in Georgia. Was that one of the reasons that you chose-

Sarah Rose Harrill: 04:24
Absolutely. Yes.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:24
… Georgia College for your WebMBA?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 04:26
Of course. When I looked at the WebMBA Program, I looked at the six different schools that participate and what their rankings were, but then also what their requirements were for … what GPA you would have to maintain, what type of scores you needed to get in, etcetera, and Georgia College was really at the top of the list as far as needing a higher GPA to graduate, having a higher standard for the students that they would be admitting.

It was an obvious choice to me. One of the other things that I really like about the WebMBA Program that I’ll just touch on shortly is that it’s team-based. I worked on a team with … there were six of us total. Five other individuals who actually were doing the same WebMBA Program with me, but were going to different universities. I worked with students that were going to Valdosta State. I worked with students that were going to Kennesaw State. It was interesting to see their perspective on a lot of the things that we were doing, but then also it highlighted that Georgia College gave me access to a lot of resources that other universities didn’t provide that were going through the same system.

Jon Waterhouse: 05:39
Got you. Well, you’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, master of logistics and supply chain management, and master of management information systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

This week we’re talking with Sarah Rose, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA Program. Now, Sarah, let’s talk a little bit about the affordability of Georgia College’s WebMBA Program. I know they’ve received some rankings as one of the most affordable programs out there. Did that play into your choosing?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 06:27
Absolutely. My husband and I are in our mid-20s and we’re both relatively new in our career paths. When I started talking about going back for a graduate degree, the tuition cost was obviously a big factor in that decision. The Georgia WebMBA Program was extremely affordable, and it was a realistic thing to fit into our budget. So realistic, in fact, that my husband also decided to go back for his graduate degree at the same time.

Jon Waterhouse: 07:06
Really?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 07:07
Yes. He did. When I was about halfway through my WebMBA Program, he started his graduate degree in design. It goes to show that we were able to balance both of those degrees while still being really very young in our careers.

Jon Waterhouse: 07:26
As you mentioned earlier, you went to Georgia College as an undergrad and lived on campus. Can you compare and contrast the campus experience versus working remote and online?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 07:37
Yeah, absolutely. I’m glad you asked that. When I went to Georgia College for my undergraduate degree, I actually transferred in from Appalachian State University. I was coming in my sophomore year, new kid on the block, kind of missed out on a lot of that orientation stuff that you get your freshman year. But I looked at it as an opportunity to just jump in both feet and immerse myself in the college and the student life.

I was extremely involved on campus and did things like student government and the leadership programs and sorority and all of that. I loved being that busy. I really lived by the motto of “the more you do the more you can do.” I was extremely involved on campus and just loved everything about it. My husband and my friends will tease me and say I actually got my bachelor’s degree in Georgia College, not kinesiology.

That was one thing that I was a little anxious about going into the online master’s program. I had taken some online courses as an undergrad, but just maybe two or three and didn’t have a negative experience with them, but was just worried that I wouldn’t have that same connection to this school and wouldn’t really feel like a student being so far away. I will give all the credit to the administrative support at Georgia College, but then also to the professors in the program.

They have done everything they can to make sure that you’re so engaged no matter where you are. The classes that I took, I was taught by instructors from these six different university system schools. One semester I could have a professor from Valdosta State and another professor from Georgia College. The next semester it would shuffle. All of the professors in the program did a fantastic job and there are so many resources available now that with online classes, you can have live video streaming, you can have a more interactive experience with your professor than you could in the past.

Jon Waterhouse: 09:54
I definitely want to talk more about the support later on in the show, but I know when it comes to going back to school, folks who have been out of the university system, out of college for some time often become intimidated by the fact that they have to take any sort of placement exams such as the GRE and I understand that Georgia College’s WebMBA offers a GRE waiver. Did you opt for one?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 10:21
I actually did not need to opt for one because I had taken the GRE within … I think it’s within the last three years they will take it.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:21
Got you. Okay.

Sarah Rose Harrill: 10:29
I took it when I was still working on my bachelor’s degree, knew that I was interested in maybe doing a graduate program, wasn’t sure exactly what so I just wanted to take the GRE once to see what I was getting myself into more than anything else and thankfully, did well enough on that and it was recent enough that they would still take it. The one thing that I did take advantage of is they actually have short courses that you can take if you didn’t already have the prerequisite courses.

For example, I got my bachelor’s degree in kinesiology. I didn’t take a whole lot of finance courses in my undergrad, and as a result, I was a little bit anxious going into this program with the finance and the accounting classes and I was able to take … I think it was an eight-week like quick course before I started the WebMBA Program through Georgia College that allowed me to be up to speed and ready to go.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:27
Sounds fantastic. Well you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. This week we’re talking with Sarah Rose, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA Program. We’re going to be learning more about Sarah Rose’s experiences through her participation in the Georgia College WebMBA Program in just a few moments. We’ll be back after the break. (singing)

Richard Lenz: 11:56
Hi. This is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business. (singing)

Jon Waterhouse: 12:27
Welcome back. We’ve got more for you on this week’s episode of Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re talking with Sarah Rose. In 2018, she completed her master’s degree in Business Administration through the WebMBA Program at Georgia College. Sarah Rose has used this degree to advance her career as a healthcare administrator at Emory Healthcare.

Also, in 2018, Sarah Rose began Emory’s management development program. This three to five-year program shapes future leaders of Emory Healthcare by providing mentorship, exposure, hands-on project experience, management and leadership opportunities, and a strong professional network. Now, Sarah Rose, let’s talk a little bit about the pros and cons of participating in an online degree. I know there are some skepticism out there. Well, let’s share your own experience and your own thoughts.

Sarah Rose Harrill: 13:29
Yeah, absolutely. I’m a big pro and con list girl.

Jon Waterhouse: 13:33
Yeah?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 13:35
It’s part of a lot of my decision making.

Jon Waterhouse: 13:38
You’ve got the spreadsheet going.

Sarah Rose Harrill: 13:39
I’ve got spreadsheets. It’s color-coded. It’s beautiful. I definitely made a pro and a con list when looking for master’s programs. I would encourage everyone to take a step back and think about what’s realistic for your lifestyle. I looked at mine and I work in healthcare and taking care of patients does not work on an 8:00 to 5:00 schedule necessarily. Life happens and I need to be available when those things happen.

For me, the time was a big component of this decision. One of the big pros of an online program is that you do have a little bit more time built-in naturally because you’re doing this at your convenience for the most part, in your home, at work, listening to lectures while you’re driving and sitting in Atlanta traffic, all of that. The fact that I could do it on my own time, for the most part, was very important to me.

Another aspect of the WebMBA Program, in particular, is that a lot of it was asynchronous. I worked on a team of six people, but I could do my piece when it fit into my schedule, and then my teammates would do the same thing. We didn’t necessarily have to all call in at the same time for this class every single week. It was more you get the schedule at the start of the semester and you plan accordingly.

One of the other things that could be a pro or a con, depending on who you are, is it requires a lot of self-discipline. I’m a scheduler by nature, so I built time into my schedule to be able to do everything that I needed to do, and I was always happy when we were able to turn things in early. That isn’t necessarily the same for all folks so depending on who you are that could be a pro or a con.

One of the other things that I was really anxious about before starting this program was whether or not I would still have that same support with Georgia College, the administration, the WebMBA staff. Thankfully, I really had a wonderful experience and felt they were with me every step of the way, so that turned out to not be a con for me either.

Jon Waterhouse: 16:02
After the break, we’re going to learn more about that support provided by Georgia College’s WebMBA staff. You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. This week we’re talking with Sarah Rose, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA Program. Stick around for more. (singing)

Richard Lenz: 16:29
Hi. This is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business. (singing)

Jon Waterhouse: 16:54
Welcome back to Lenz on Business. We’ve got more business talk for you here on WSB. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, master of logistics and supply chain management, and master of management information systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

This week we’re talking with Sarah Rose, and in 2018, she completed her master’s degree in Business Administration through the WebMBA Program at Georgia College. Sarah Rose has used this degree to advance her career as a healthcare administrator at Emory Healthcare here in Atlanta. Sarah Rose, let’s talk a little bit about the support that you received at Georgia College through the WebMBA Program. I can imagine that that would be a concern for some people.

Sarah Rose Harrill: 17:55
Absolutely.

Jon Waterhouse: 17:55
Working remotely, working online, are you going to have that interaction with the support staff, with the professors? Can you kind of give your personal experience and thoughts regarding that?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 18:06
Of course. Now, when we talk about support, we really need to give credit to a lot of different folks, at least, in my personal journey. The Georgia College staff was spectacular. I reached out on more than one occasion over the 18 months with questions or concerns or needing clarification and I always got a response extremely fast and thorough responses at that. I truly can’t say enough about how wonderful the team at Georgia College is.

Next, moving onto the WebMBA staff, that support staff is equally fantastic. But I really want to focus on the professors because I don’t think they get enough of the glory. The professors in the WebMBA Program are extremely responsive. These are busy people that are often teaching in-person classes, doing their own research, all of these other things going on, much like the students working full time, doing other things at … family, all of that.

All of the professors that I had through this program were responsive, receptive. We had a unique situation wherein halfway through my degree, my husband was actually diagnosed with a rare form of cancer and kicked us in the gut as it would anybody. I looked at him and said, “Do you want me to put this on hold? Should we … what’s going to be the right decision for our family?”

We talked about it and based off the support that I had from Georgia College and from the professors, and also from my teammates, I was able to complete my degree, continuing to go full time, continue to work full time and also being a caregiver for my husband. I can’t thank those people enough for everything they did for my family to support us during that time. My teammates, in particular, are fantastic.

One of the great things about this WebMBA Program is that with it being team-based, you’re going through a lot of these experiences together. One of the things that I really loved about my team is that of the six of us, we were all in very different phases of our lives. We were in different industries, we were across the country in different geographic places, and they were fantastic. I was able to bring my own unique skill set to the table and I was able to learn from their skill sets.

The support of having different people going through the program with you at the same time and taking the same classes with the same professors, and dealing with the same life events, just can’t emphasize how important that is.

Jon Waterhouse: 20:54
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Sarah Rose, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA Program.

Now, Sarah Rose, let’s talk a little bit about the stresses that you faced, not only balancing a career, but as you said your husband’s cancer diagnosis while working on your master’s degree, and let’s talk a little bit about how that all works and how that came to play with Georgia College’s WebMBA Program?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 21:33
Yeah, absolutely. We got the diagnosis when I was in the middle of my fourth of the five semesters. I was about halfway through the program and I was very honest with the team at Georgia College and they were not one of the first calls, but they definitely got a call the week that we got our diagnosis. I just wanted them to know, “Hey, this is something that’s going on. We have zero control over it so it may impact my ability to do what I needed to do for classes. It may not, it may be totally fine, but I just want to make sure that you all are aware of this.”

The support that they provided was amazing. I was also very straightforward with my professors because I wanted them to know I’m going to do my best to work ahead and stay ahead of all of this, but we could be going along our day and get a call and we have to be at the hospital. There’s so much that you have no control over and being a bit of a control freak myself, that was a valuable lesson to learn.

The timing maybe could have been better but … Life happens and that’s one of the things that we talked about when we went to orientation for the WebMBA is there are going to be life events over these next 18 months. You hope they’re really good ones. You hope people have babies and exciting promotions happen. We had those too within our group. But there are also some not so great ones that happen, and it just shows the resilience and it’s … I look at it as a character-building opportunity.

It was more about how can I prioritize my time and the things in my life so that I’m able to exert the appropriate amount of energy as a wife, as a professional, as a student, and working down that line every day. Some days worked really well, some days did not go according to plan at all. Having the ability to give yourself grace and give everyone in your environment grace was also key to get through that experience.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:48
What sort of advice would you give a 30 something aged professional who’s considering a graduate degree?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 23:55
I would definitely encourage people to look at what their priorities are in their life, what their lifestyle is like, what types of things are deal breakers for them when looking at programs. For me, weekend classes or night classes was a deal-breaker. I just didn’t have that type of ability to walk away from work and truly be done and not know that I would have to get … not get a call and have to come back in.

I knew that weekend classes weren’t something that I was able to do, and also I didn’t really want to do. I wanted to do my schoolwork in my pajamas, on my couch on the weekends instead of going into class. I would also encourage folks to understand that this is a commitment to yourself and to your teammates and your professors and your family. Understanding and building in the time into your schedule each week. Ideally, building that time in at the start of the week so that when everything goes not according to plan, you have more days in the week to finish whatever you need to do.

Then, finally, to use your resources. Look at the different schools, look at the different programs, determine which schools are going to provide the support that you need for your life and jump in. Just go for it.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:29
You’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Sarah Rose, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA Program. Now, Sarah Rose, can you tell us a little bit about how your WebMBA has had an impact on your job?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 25:52
Absolutely. No. I would love to talk about that because I’ve been very blessed. I’ve been with Emory Healthcare for four and a half years now and decided that I wanted to get a master’s degree. One of the influencing factors on that decision was the desire to do Emory’s management development program. The three to five-year program, the requirement being that you get exposure to a lot of different things about the healthcare industry and ideally shaping you to be one of the next leaders of the organization.

I actually did this degree partially in order to do that program. Thankfully, I was able to work within our Employer Health Solutions Department. Emory has relationships with over 150 different companies and we have everything from onsite clinics at those organizations to managing the healthcare of their employees.

Also, our executive health program, which was established in 1995. It’s different from normal primary care. It’s more efficient care, coordinated, holistic and comprehensive than traditional medicine. We really pride ourselves on the work that we do and we’re ranked in the top 1% of patient satisfaction according to Press Ganey scores.

All of the work that I did in my MBA program, I am able to apply to my work now, which is great. You learn it in the classroom, you do projects where you apply it, but then getting to actually apply those skills in your real life is so much cooler. Being able to take skills that I learned from different professors and apply them to the healthcare industry, healthcare is a business so we do have to keep that in mind in everything we do and the clientele that I get to work with, in particular, gives me a lot more opportunity to do that.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:52
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB and marketing matters, Lenz knows marketing. From brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing, to public relations. Think smart. Think creative. Think Lenz. Learn more at lenzmarketing.com. This is guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re talking with Sarah Rose, a graduate of the Georgia College WebMBA Program. Stick around. We’ve got more of Sarah Rose after the break. (singing)

Richard Lenz: 28:30
Hi. This is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business. (singing)

Jon Waterhouse: 28:59
Welcome back to Lenz on Business here on WSB. We’ve got some business talk for you presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’ve been talking with Sarah Rose. In 2018, she completed her master’s degree in Business Administration through the WebMBA Program at Georgia College. She’s used this degree to advance her career as a healthcare administrator at Emory healthcare.

Now, Sarah Rose, we were talking earlier about time management when you’re completing your WebMBA. Let’s talk about competing priorities. You’ve mentioned competing priorities, how do you handle that in the midst of an MBA program like this?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 29:45
Hopefully with tact. I think one thing that really … when you’re looking at graduate programs, you think, “Okay, I’m going to do this. It’s going to exist in this bubble. It’s going to be great. I’m going to steady 15 hours a week and get a 4.0. It’s going to be awesome.” Then, life happens and, hopefully, you’re still able to make the time, but sometimes that just doesn’t happen. I think that having your priorities in check and understanding what’s important in your life and what you are and are not willing to make sacrifices on going into the program is extremely important.

If Sunday night dinners are something that are a thing in your family and you’re not willing to sacrifice having to do classwork, that’s totally fine. Keep your Sunday night dinners, but then plan other pieces of your week that you are willing to sacrifice in order to do the work that you need to do. The other thing I would say is be as candid as you can with your professors, with the support team and also with your team members.

My team had six individuals from very different walks of lives and doing different things and different industries. My priorities looked very different from some of my peers and having an understanding of where they fell on that spectrum and what they were and weren’t willing to give on is … was really vital for us. The other thing that’s somewhat related, especially with the teamwork is, knowing the personalities of the folks on your team and everyone’s strengths and weaknesses and being honest about that.

Going into this, I knew what my priorities were. I thought I had a pretty good grip on what my strengths and weaknesses were, but being open and able to learn things from other folks outside of just the professors and to absorb as much as I could and give it back as much as I could as well on that team.

Jon Waterhouse: 32:05
Did you have any personal time management techniques of prioritizing time that really worked for you?

Sarah Rose Harrill: 32:11
Yeah. For me, lists are important. I start most days trying to make a list of what I need to do that day. Then, I had a boss at one point tell me to use the rock, pebble, sand method. The rocks are like the really big things that have to happen, the pebbles fall somewhere in the middle, and the sand is something you can do in the future. If it becomes a next week thing that is totally fine. I think just making your list, prioritizing things and doing the best you can.

Jon Waterhouse: 32:45
Obviously, something that we can apply to everyday business life. Well, thanks so much to Georgia College WebMBA graduate, Sarah Rose, for joining us today. Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com. Also, Bentley Media, North Georgia’s fastest-growing film and video production company. Learn more at weonlyfilmeverything.com and make sure and check out our website for our library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s L-E-N-Z onbusiness.com. This is Jon Waterhouse for Lenz on Business. We’ll see you next week. (singing)

Richard Lenz: 33:39
Hi. This is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Dr. Karl Manrodt, Professor of LSCM, Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business

As consumers in today’s world, we want our products yesterday. We often forget it takes logistics to store and deliver goods and services for the public. And there’s so much more to it than that. Dr. Manrodt, an expert in the field, sheds light on this specialty and what the future holds for logistics as we trek further into the 21st century.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: (00:02)
It’s time for Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz, on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leaders, inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: (00:27)
As consumers in today’s world. We want our products yesterday. Amazon Prime, UPS, FedEx, and others continue to spoil us, and businesses are feeling that pressure. Goods and services require storage space and need to be delivered efficiently and steadily to customers. That’s the concept of logistics in a nutshell, but there’s much more to it than that.

Jon Waterhouse: (00:51)
Welcome to Lenz on Business, business talk here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’ll be learning about logistics and why Georgia is a logistics and transportation state. Here to share his logistics savvy is Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online master’s program for working professionals.

Jon Waterhouse: (01:31)
Dr. Manrodt has more than 25 years in logistics, transportation and supply chain research. Some of these projects have been funded by the likes of Oracle, FedEx, Ernst & Young, and the U.S. Department of State. He is the co-author of seven books and has given more than 150 presentations across the globe. Learn more about Georgia Colleges online Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program at makeyournextmove.org. Dr. Manrodt, welcome to the show.

Karl Manrodt: (02:03)
Thank you very much, Jon. I need to congratulate you. You pronounced my name correctly.

Jon Waterhouse: (02:10)
Thanks to your voicemail message. I had it all wrong, and at the last minute I listened to the voicemail message. Boom, I got it.

Karl Manrodt: (02:17)
Very good.

Jon Waterhouse: (02:19)
I gave a brief description of logistics earlier, but what exactly is logistics? Can you give us your expert definition but in layman’s terms?

Karl Manrodt: (02:28)
Well, I’ll do what I do to the students. How’s that?

Jon Waterhouse: (02:30)
Okay, yeah.

Karl Manrodt: (02:30)
So that will be the intro version of what logistics is all about.

Jon Waterhouse: (02:34)
Great.

Karl Manrodt: (02:35)
If you think about logistics, it’s everything involved with moving and storing of goods. That’s kind of like the older definition, but it really is around planning, implementing, and controlling all of those processes. So if you think about getting bottled water into the station, how do we actually do that is really a logistical issue. So I need to think about moving from an origin all the way through to a destination to get that product in. So that’s logistics in the broader term. Within an organization, that’s what they focus in on. How do I do my part of it?

Karl Manrodt: (03:06)
Now there’s another term that you kind of talked about a little bit, it was this idea about supply chains, right?

Jon Waterhouse: (03:12)
Right.

Karl Manrodt: (03:12)
Supply chains are a lot broader than just logistics. So logistics would be what one or two companies are working on together to manage those processes. A supply chain would be everybody involved in it, right? So if I bring in a product in from Asia as an example, right? I’m going to have multiple parties involved with it. The ocean, transportation companies, trucking, ocean, air, I’ve got customs, right? It lands in the Port of Savannah, how do we get it out of the port, and then moving all the way through that process to get it in. So all that process would really be involved with the supply chain.

Jon Waterhouse: (03:49)
And it’s huge. What a chain.

Karl Manrodt: (03:51)
It is very large and it’s getting more complicated as we go along. So when you even talked about getting things yesterday, that’s really where the movement is, not just getting it as soon as possible, but even made as soon as possible and then deliver it to my home. But we’ll talk about that in a little bit.

Jon Waterhouse: (04:09)
I’m looking forward to that because that involves me. That’s a very selfish reason.

Karl Manrodt: (04:14)
We’ll talk about you all day long. That’s fine.

Jon Waterhouse: (04:17)
So Karl, you have a PhD in Logistics and Transportation from the University of Tennessee. What drew you to this concentration? Obviously, a lot of interesting layers in the whole topic of logistics.

Karl Manrodt: (04:30)
That’s an interesting question. I think only by the grace of God, I actually listened to my wife for the first time. We had been married about five years and she goes, “You really ought to think about getting a degree,” and move up in what I was doing. I ended up with a master’s degree in logistics at Wright State University. But then I interned with a company in Corby, England. Now you got to go back to 1987. The Internet wasn’t really that big a deal.

Jon Waterhouse: (04:57)
I had a mullet.

Karl Manrodt: (05:00)
I don’t know if I can get that out of my head right now.

Karl Manrodt: (05:03)
That’s a scary thought, you know? I had a beard.

Jon Waterhouse: (05:07)
All right.

Karl Manrodt: (05:07)
So that’s also a scary thought. But I got a call back in ’87 and at five o’clock in the morning it said, “Hey, do you want to come to Corby and intern?” I interned with this great company, got a great experience, wrote an article about that with another faculty member, and she encouraged me to get a PhD. So long story short, it’s really a series of listening to people in your life to say, “Well, this is a really cool area. You ought to get into it,” and haven’t looked back since.

Jon Waterhouse: (05:32)
Logistics of course looking forward, logistics can make or break a business. So explain why logistics really matters.

Karl Manrodt: (05:41)
Well, I think it goes back to your opening comment. We want everything yesterday, right? So as that desire from a consumer increases and that demand to get things today within two hours, logistics will become much more critical to the organization to deliver that as quickly and effectively as possible. So firms that can do that are going to go ahead and win. Firms that cannot do that and get stuck in their path in saying, “This is how we deliver products, services as well,” are going to go ahead and fail. It’s just a matter of time.

Jon Waterhouse: (06:14)
You’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems, online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Dr Karl Manrodt, a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

Jon Waterhouse: (06:51)
Now let’s talk about logistics right here in the great state of Georgia, Karl. What’s the climate like these days?

Karl Manrodt: (06:57)
The climate is really good and we have a lot of structure to be thankful for, but also leadership. So if you were to take, for instance, the Port of Savannah, it’s the fourth largest container port in the United States. It’s the largest on the East Coast, and we’ve been blessed by two things. One is very good and consistent leadership at the port. I arrived back into Georgia in 2000 and Doug Marchand was the director at that point. Curtis took over after that, and now Lynch is in charge. All three have really followed a very strong, sustainable path for growth. And so they’ve had that vision and they’ve managed that vision very well.

Karl Manrodt: (07:40)
Let me give you a number behind that. When I got here the first year in 2000, they have a State of the Port Address in Savannah and we hit around 900,000 TEUs. Now a TEU is a box. So when you’re on the highway and you see the boxes on a semi, that’s a container. And a TEU is a 20-foot equivalent unit, all right? So we moved in the state of Georgia back in 2000 about 930,000 of those.

Karl Manrodt: (08:09)
Now let’s fast forward to this last September. We did 4.6 million TEUs.

Jon Waterhouse: (08:16)
Wow.

Karl Manrodt: (08:16)
In just that amount of time. So, great leadership on the side of the port for bringing in those shippers that we need, but also great infrastructure as well. If you think about it, there’s a lot of people that live in the Southeast. I know you’re going to find this hard to believe, but people are leaving Detroit and New York and they’re coming farther South. Well, when they come South, they need to go ahead and shop. That means all the goods that they used to buy in those high tax states, I didn’t really say that did I, but they all left. They’re coming down here. They need those goods and services. By default, all those goods are going to go ahead and follow as well. So great infrastructure, great location, great leadership has really led to really superior growth, and that growth is just going to continue in the years to come.

Jon Waterhouse: (09:03)
It really gives businesses a competitive advantage due to the logistics climate here in Georgia. Can you kind of explain and piggyback on that a little bit?

Karl Manrodt: (09:11)
Sure, exactly. Well, to go along with that, one that goes along with the climate side is that the port is very instrumental in getting something that has not been done in a lot of other ports. We have two what are referred to as class one railroads, Norfolk Southern and CSX, operating out of the port. We’re the only port that has literally the lines on the port property, and they’re building a longer track, which enables them to build bigger trains to go to farther cities. So where we have a train that may come up to Atlanta once a day, we’re now able to compete and serve as far away as Kansas.

Karl Manrodt: (09:50)
If you think about that freight coming in, our ability to impact a wider range of the U.S. now becomes much more feasible and much more practical and much more cost effective for merchandisers. So they can build their facilities in there, get great turnaround times at the port, great service out of the port, and then get their products obviously faster to you and I, because like you said, it’s all about you.

Jon Waterhouse: (10:18)
Let’s talk about roads and highways in Georgia. Let’s move from railroads to roads and highways. Of course, they’re also essential to business logistics, but I was checking out one of your presentations and it cites a 2013 report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers. They gave Georgia’s bridges and roads a C minus, right? And I’ve hit a couple of potholes so I know what they’re talking about, not too impressive. How are Georgia’s roads impacting logistics?

Karl Manrodt: (10:47)
Well, it’s kind of like everything else. The minute that you hit a a barrier or any construction, you’re going to go ahead and slow down, and that congestion is definitely going to go and slow down product significantly. So now I have to worry about, or if I’m on the logistic side to think through, what’s the best route to take the product? The good news is that we’re actually starting to construct and work on our roads to get them a little bit more effective and improve them. But you’re right, when you start looking at the overall, I need to frame that, you need to understand even though we’re doing really bad, so is the rest of the country. So we just can’t point to Georgia and say, “You really are terrible at it.” Overall, as a nation, we’re really bad when it comes to our transportation infrastructure right now and it really needs to be improved pretty significantly.

Jon Waterhouse: (11:34)
Got you. Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (11:59)
Stick around for more on Lenz on Business here on WSB. This week we’re talking with Dr. Karl Manrodt, a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. We got more for you after the break.

Richard Lenz: (12:17)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (12:45)
This week’s Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business is on the move, literally. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and we’re talking about the business of logistics with quite an expert. That’s Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online masters program for working professionals. You can visit makeyournextmove.org to learn more. Dr. Manrodt has done an exhaustive amount of logistics research, co-authored seven books, and has given more than 150 presentations across the globe.

Jon Waterhouse: (13:35)
Now, Karl, I noticed that four of your books are about procurement. Let’s talk about that.

Karl Manrodt: (13:41)
Well, Jon, you just opened up a can of worms.

Jon Waterhouse: (13:42)
Uh-oh.

Karl Manrodt: (13:43)
Because when you start thinking about how much transportation or logistics has changed over the last 30 years since I’ve been in the industry, you could mirror that over in procurement as well. Here’s what’s really happening. So let’s go back and level-set maybe 30, 40 years ago. Do you remember being on an airplane, and since we’re in Atlanta we have to talk about Delta, right?

Jon Waterhouse: (14:04)
Yes.

Karl Manrodt: (14:04)
So you open it up and there will be an ad about how to negotiate, right? And it’s all about when you look at that in the underlying process, it’s really about power. How do I use my power to get the best deal possible? How do I leverage that to make it work? Well, let’s think about that for a little bit. If I go into a store or anything like that and I try to use my power, and I’ll put that in quotes, to get the best deal, that supplier, that store really doesn’t like me a whole lot because I’m not really friendly about it. I just want to go ahead and beat him up and get the best price possible. Longterm, that really doesn’t develop a strong relationship that makes things work well. Millennials and a lot of us just don’t like the way that works anyway.

Karl Manrodt: (14:50)
So firms are really rethinking how they actually procure goods and services. So one of them, we got involved with this back in the Air Force about 15 years ago, looking at how Air Force and industry in the private sector actually does procurement well, how do they manage relationships? What we’re finding is that there’s different models that firms can use or employ to actually get the best benefits.

Karl Manrodt: (15:17)
So, let’s go back to our own lives because we like to talk about ourselves, so I can start thinking about a transactional relationship, right? I go to Starbucks, it’s kind of a transaction. I put in my app what I want. I don’t even have to talk to anybody, right? And they just give me the product that I want and I can walk out. But we also have places where we buy things that are much more relational in focus. If you think about our doctors, right? I kid with my students that I’ve got like six of them keeping me alive today, you know? And that all changed after I hit 50. So my relationship with them is very different. It’s a give and take. Companies are doing the same thing because they’re looking at their suppliers to say, “How can you give me the best benefit possible? How can you bring me innovation into the organization?”

Karl Manrodt: (16:04)
You know, McDonald’s is a great leader in this whole side. Do you know how many pages their contracts are with their key suppliers?

Jon Waterhouse: (16:11)
I have no idea.

Karl Manrodt: (16:12)
I’m sorry, they don’t have one. It’s zero. So think about a multi-billion dollar organization not having a contract, but a handshake and a relationship that manages that process. That’s kind of cool, and we really studied a lot of those relationships and see how those work.

Jon Waterhouse: (16:31)
We’re going to hear from more from Dr. Karl Manrodt in just a few moments. You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and just complete the form to get started. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Don’t go anyplace. We’ll be back just right after the break.

Richard Lenz: (17:04)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (17:29)
Welcome back to Lenz on Business here on WSB. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (17:54)
Now, I don’t know about you, but on this week’s Lenz on Business, I’m getting a crash course in logistics because the logistics doctor is in the house. I’m talking about Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online master’s program for working professionals. You can visit makeyournextmove.org to learn more. Dr. Manrodt has done an exhaustive amount of logistics research, co-authored seven books, and has given more than 150 presentations across the globe.

Jon Waterhouse: (18:38)
Dr. Manrodt, interesting stuff here today. I’m learning all kinds of new things about logistics. Actually, I knew very little, but I do know something that is kind of freaking me out, and that has to do with automated transportation and how that might be changing and affecting logistics. There’s a super creepy FedEx commercial where a robot comes to the door, replacing the FedEx delivery person. My daughter, she freaked when she saw it. She said, “That is weird.” So let’s talk about that, Karl. What do you think about our future as far as robots and automation and logistics?

Karl Manrodt: (19:14)
You’re going to get really freaked out.

Jon Waterhouse: (19:16)
Okay, let’s hear it.

Karl Manrodt: (19:18)
If you start looking at the reasons for automation, a lot of them deal with safety, but also one of the structural problems we have is that there’s not a lot of drivers. We have a driver shortage that we’ve experienced for probably 30 years now. Not enough people want to become a truck driver. I get it. With all the stereotypes and everything that goes with it, people don’t appreciate the professionalism that it takes to actually move our goods along the interstates safely. They always get kind of the bad apple in the bunch, and that’s what they focus in on. It’s very unfair, but that’s life.

Karl Manrodt: (19:52)
So automation can really help me reduce our costs fairly significantly. There’s technology today that all allow trucks to platoon together. So basically truck one and truck two are going to be synced, kind of like by Bluetooth, and the driver in the first truck will automatically drive the second truck as well.

Jon Waterhouse: (20:12)
My goodness.

Karl Manrodt: (20:13)
And the third or the fourth and the fifth. I’ll still have drivers in there, but I can get greater fuel efficiency by allowing them to be a little bit closer together going down the highway. So what’s driving it? It’s going to be cost. That’s going to be the number one driver.

Karl Manrodt: (20:28)
Number two driver is this whole idea about convenience. You said you want everything yesterday. How do I go ahead and do that? Let me give you a really good example about what I think is going to happen in the future. Companies like, well, let’s talk about Kroger. They have Clicklist. I don’t know if you use it. My wife uses it all the time.

Jon Waterhouse: (20:45)
We do.

Karl Manrodt: (20:45)
Matter of fact, I picked up the order yesterday and I’m standing there, and our person is putting it in the truck and I said, “My wife sure bought a lot of stuff today.” She goes, “Yeah, this is a big order for her.” They knew who she was, you know?

Karl Manrodt: (20:59)
But now if I’m Kroger, that isn’t the end point. The end point is really how do I deliver goods to your home? Why do you have to come to Kroger to pick that up? Or why don’t I have an autonomous vehicle that will pull up to your home, unload your groceries, you come out, you can go ahead and swipe a card, and a basket will open up with all your goods in it, freezer and refrigerated and dry goods. You pull your things out and then you go, “You know what? I really forgot bananas.” So you can go ahead and log in, and they can go ahead and sell you bananas as well.

Karl Manrodt: (21:34)
Why isn’t that going to happen? It will happen, right? It’s just a matter of time. Autonomous vehicles are going to hit the roads. Now it’s a big debate on how quickly it will hit the road, but it’s going to go ahead and happen. Companies that you just mentioned are exploring and finding new ways to do things.

Karl Manrodt: (21:51)
Another example, Amazon, Audi, and DHL formed a partnership in Europe. Now any ideas why they would form a partnership?

Jon Waterhouse: (22:03)
No idea.

Karl Manrodt: (22:04)
Well, you ordered something on Amazon and your big fear is, you know what, it could get stolen. So I don’t want it delivered to my house. So, buy an Audi, because then when you place your order, DHL will see that you got the order, they’ll pick it up. Instead of delivering it to your home, they’ll ping your car, find out where you’re located, drive up to your car, have a onetime code, open up your trunk, and then put the goods in your trunk and then drive away. You’ll get notified the goods are in your car, okay? So another way to use autonomy, right, and automation to be a lot more effective and efficient.

Karl Manrodt: (22:43)
Now when I shared this story to a bunch of friends who were sitting around at dinner, and they’re all kind of in our age group, and I said, “Well, what do you think?” They said, “That’s great. That’s a wonderful idea. I really love that.” Because you can see through how much time that’s going to save. What do you think the reaction was from my students?

Jon Waterhouse: (23:01)
I don’t know. What do you think?

Karl Manrodt: (23:02)
They hated it. They were like, “I don’t want to let anybody into my trunk of my car.” And I’m like, “Well, what do you have in your trunk?” That kind of scared me a little bit. So I don’t know.

Jon Waterhouse: (23:11)
Just get rid of the bodies first and everything will be okay.

Karl Manrodt: (23:15)
But look at Amazon. Now they’re going to the automated process where they can actually get into your house and then deliver the goods, not on your porch, but in inside in your hallway, right? So autonomy is moving in a direction where we haven’t figured it all out, but it’s coming.

Karl Manrodt: (23:33)
Two more examples. You talked about getting everything yesterday. How about on Amazon, there’s a great opportunity for a company that can actually design and knit a dress for our spouse in 26 minutes, okay? Now think about that. If I’m Amazon, and Amazon actually has a patent on this idea, what they’re going to do is, your wife orders a dress. She goes, “This is what I want with the type of fabric or the knit that I want.” Amazon’s going to have that on a truck and it will start driving to your home. It will knit the dress as it drives and when it gets there, it’ll be done. The driver puts it into a box or puts it into a bag and delivers it to your home. 26 minutes.

Karl Manrodt: (24:23)
So, they’re talking about not just on knitting dresses, that’s a different company in New York, but I can do that with 3D printing, right? So I’ll print your product and then have it delivered to your home. I’ll put 3D printers on my trucks and then deliver that out, okay?

Karl Manrodt: (24:39)
Again, is it that far away? I don’t know. I don’t think it’s quite as far as we think it is. I think technology is really advancing pretty rapidly that will enable those types of things to occur.

Jon Waterhouse: (24:53)
That’s George Jetson stuff, for real. I’m still waiting for the flying cars, by the way.

Karl Manrodt: (24:58)
I hope they don’t come. I’ve seen some people drive in Georgia and Tennessee and some other places, and it’s not a pretty sight.

Jon Waterhouse: (25:05)
Folks, you’re locked into Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Dr Karl Manrodt, a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

Jon Waterhouse: (25:39)
Dr. Manrodt, you’re an original researcher in the concept of Vested, which is also known as Vested outsourcing. That’s a specific type of hybrid business model. Can you give me an example that might be familiar to me and our listeners?

Karl Manrodt: (25:54)
Sure. We talked a little bit about McDonald’s just a minute ago, and that was probably one of the most fascinating set of case study interviews that we really did. Think about a process where a buyer and supplier work together to determine the best way to deliver a service or product to their customers and where you allow the customer or the supplier to bring innovation into your organization. Most people really don’t like that because they think, “I’ve got to invent it or I have to own everything.” So they close themselves in and not open to a lot of different things.

Karl Manrodt: (26:29)
When H.A. Lafley took over at Proctor and Gamble, he changed the culture. He said, “50% of our innovation really needs to come from external suppliers.” So how do I do that? Well, I’ve got to go ahead and create a process where a system that allows that to occur. Vested is all about that system. How do I make it effective and efficient to develop a relationship between people? So I focus on outcomes. I don’t focus in on individual tasks. What’s our outcome? We want market share, we want to introduce new products, whatever that outcome is. I want to focus on what I want to get accomplished, not how to do it.

Karl Manrodt: (27:10)
If you were to have somebody come over and say, “You know what? I want to have my house cleaned,” I don’t tell them how to clean the house, I don’t say they have to use these types of cleaners to clean the house. I just say I want the house cleaned, right? And I’m going to allow them to do the best job possible, right? So I have to focus in on the things that are really critical. The measurements that I use and put in place have to be directly aligned to those outcomes.

Karl Manrodt: (27:35)
Then the final part where two pieces is that instead of just a single price, I’m going to have a pricing model. So I’m going to go ahead and look at pricing very differently that could be variable based on our success. Then I really have to manage the relationship, and most companies don’t manage relationship. They just sign the contract and they expect it to get done. The reality is relationships just don’t work that way.

Karl Manrodt: (28:00)
It’s kind of like the joke about the old farmer. He goes home after they get married and his wife says, “You don’t tell me you love me anymore.” And he says, “Well, I still do, and when I change my mind, I’ll let you know.” Right? You can’t do that, right? So you have to manage relationships. Vested really is about developing trusting relationships that allow both firms to achieve the desired outcomes that they’re trying to get. It’s been going barnstorms as far as across Canada and especially in Europe as far as on the adoption of those techniques.

Jon Waterhouse: (28:35)
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget marketing matters, and Lenz knows marketing, from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations. Thanks smart, thank creative, think Lenz. Learn more at lenzmarketing.com.

Jon Waterhouse: (29:00)
We’ve got more for you just after the break with Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a logistics guru from Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, sharing his logistics savvy here on Lenz on Business. We got more. Stick around. Don’t go no place.

Richard Lenz: (29:22)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (29:49)
Yes, you’re tuned into Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, warming that chair for Richard Lenz, and this week we’ve been talking with logistics expert, Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He is also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online masters program for working professionals. Visit makeyournextmove.org to learn more.

Jon Waterhouse: (30:30)
Now Karl, how is higher education changing these days? What are some of the current trends and issues at the forefront facing you?

Karl Manrodt: (30:39)
Well, how much time do we have? There’s a lot of issues. Probably the biggest one that we start looking at, a couple, is going to be on resources, right, having the appropriate level of resources to do the job. I think no matter what university professor you’re ever going to talk to, they’re going to say we need more, right?

Jon Waterhouse: (30:58)
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Karl Manrodt: (30:59)
We need to be a good steward of what we use as well to make sure that it’s effective for the students. So resources are always going to be a big issue. But how we deliver education is also under hundred radical change. You even talked about in the introduction. We do an online master’s program, and so now you’re starting to see more education moving towards online environments, right? I can just sit at home and get my groceries. I can sit at home and get my education, right? That’s an interesting trend and maybe not necessarily a very good one. If you think about it, if you’re 18, 19 years old, I know this is going to be hard for them to hear or listen to, they really don’t know that much. And to cater to that group is kind of scary, right? Because we’re going to say we’re going to go ahead and build our environment, our society, around an 18-year-old. I’m not disagreeing that we shouldn’t cater to them somewhat, but we also have to think about what’s best for them longterm, right?

Karl Manrodt: (32:00)
So how do I deliver content is easy. I can do that online. I can do that in person. But is that really what higher education ought to be about? Is it about content or is it about character? Am I trying to go ahead and instill in them how to live, think, and really be a productive member of society? If I think about why I got into this or why I stay in education, it’s really about developing those relationships with my students.

Karl Manrodt: (32:28)
We talked just a moment ago about sourcing and how Vested is changing how we think about relational management and how that’s changing relationships between buyers and suppliers. Kind of in the same way, I think higher ed, or at least faculty, ought to rethink why they got into this business. There’s a lot of stuff that you could do to make money. That’s not a problem. But what are you doing to change society in a positive manner? How are you investing your life back into those students that are in front of you every day? I can do that in person. I can do that by taking students out to lunch. So every single student in my class had to sit through a lunch with me. Yeah, I feel sorry for them, you know, because that’s a bad thing.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:10)
Unless you bought it.

Karl Manrodt: (33:10)
I did buy.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:11)
Good.

Karl Manrodt: (33:12)
So they probably liked it, you know? But the goal is to go ahead and you share your life with them, to get them to be better and to think not just about logistics but about their life to be more effective in what they do.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:23)
Thanks so much to Dr. Karl Manrodt of Georgia College for joining us this week. Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com. And make sure and check out our website for our library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s L-E-N-Z onbusiness.com.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:49)
The whole shebang was presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. You can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and just complete the form to get started. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. We’ll see you next time on Lenz on Business right here on WSB.

Richard Lenz: (34:20)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz here. You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Georgiana Simmons, Avanos Medical, graduate of Georgia College’s online Master of LSCM

When it comes to going back to school and getting that business-related masters degree, fear can be a deterrent. Finding time amidst a busy life can be a daunting proposition. And this week’s guest did it despite being a single mother and working two jobs at the time. Georgiana Simmons, a project manager in supply chain operations at Avanos Medical, explains how she did it and the ways she applies her degree in her career.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz on Business, with Richard Lenz, on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leader’s inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon W: 00:23
When it comes to going back to school to get that business related master’s degree, fear can be a deterrent. Finding the time amidst a busy life in the real world can be a daunting proposition, but this week’s guest did it despite being a single mother and working two jobs at the same time. Welcome to Lenz on Business Business Talk on WSB presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and please welcome to the WSB studio Georgiana Simmons. She’s a project manager in supply chain operations at Avanos Medical. Now Avanos Medical Inc is a medical technology company focusing on delivering clinical medical device solutions. Georgiana received her Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program and you can learn more about that program at makeyournextmove.org. Georgiana welcome to the show.

Georgiana: 01:26
Thank you for having me, Jon.

Jon W: 01:28
Thank you so much for coming. It’s great to see you. What do you think about Atlanta traffic? I know you had quite a distance to come.

Georgiana: 01:35
Well I did, but thank God it’s summer. School’s out. So it was a little easier today, but yes, it still took me an hour.

Jon W: 01:44
Oh my goodness. Atlanta traffic. Well speaking of your undergraduate degree, we were talking about your graduate degree, but let’s talk about your undergraduate degree. You got that in 2007 and almost a decade later you decided to go back to school. And many students opt for a master’s just a handful of years after their undergraduate experience. Any reason for the wait?

Georgiana: 02:10
Yes. So being the sole income breadwinner for a household of four, finances actually was in the back of my brain. How was I going to be able to afford to go back to school while also paying off the education loans that I inquired for my bachelor’s degrees? So yes, and also life happened where I was working two jobs and I was raising two teenagers in the household. So they needed me. But it was always my desire to go back to school and get my master’s degree. And in 2007 when I got my bachelor’s degree, I was working in the mortgage industry and we all know what happened in 2007 in the mortgage industry. And I was determined not to go back. So I started in a new industry. I got the opportunity to work for a molecular biology lab in Buford, Georgia. And my sole role was to source materials for product that was in development. And so that’s what introduced me to supply chain management at that time. And that became my passion.

Georgiana: 03:32
So I started looking for other supply chain management roles, and I was very fortunate to begin a career with Kimberly Clark Corporation, which is off of Roswell Road, which is, Avanos is also formerly known as Kimberly Clark Health Care, and started in distribution for Kimberly Clark. So I went from sourcing to distribution and I was like, wow, there’s so many more elements and facets to supply chain management and I just want to learn more. So I worked my way up in Kimberly Clark into Kimberly Clark Health Care and pursued certification in supply chain management and was introduced to APICS, it’s the leader or organization in certification and supply chain management and they referred me to Georgia College to get my master’s degree.

Georgiana: 04:35
I think I was just ready. I was paying for certification online through organizations like APICS and was doing a search. APICS offers publications and they offer information that’s recent to the industry and there happened to be an advertisement on the top 10 schools in the country for supply chain management and of course the worry about how I was going to finance that of course was the overall concern for me. But as I was looking at the top 10 schools, the one that stood out was Georgia College. It wasn’t just that it was the oldest supply chain management school in Georgia, but it was also a liberal arts school that was affordable. And I did more research, I actually reached out to Georgia College and asked them how much the program was and I was very shocked by the low price or inexpensive cost of the program, and that it was considered one of the top 10 schools even though. So that is what drove me to get my degree.

Jon W: 05:59
Folks you’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

Jon W: 06:26
I am guest host Jon Waterhouse and this week we’re talking with Georgiana Simmons. She is a graduate of Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business. She received her Masters in Supply Chain Management, actually Logistics and Supply Chain Management. She currently works at Avanos Medical in supply chain operations.

Jon W: 06:50
Now Georgiana you were talking about choosing Georgia College for your master’s degree and its online program. Now, did you have any preconceived notions of online learning?

Georgiana: 07:05
I did. I did things a little backwards in life. I’ve also been blessed with many opportunities. I had my first child at the age of 19 and I was still insisting on getting an education. So I got accepted to the University of Georgia and I was taking classes the traditional way, but I was also taking care of an infant and it became apparent that it was going to be harder than I thought it was.

Georgiana: 07:45
Life happened, so I had to drop school at that time and pursue being a mother and also I needed to work. I needed to bring an income to the family. So I turned 30 years old and realized I still had not received my bachelor’s degree, but realized that online learning had become very popular. It was gaining more, like I said, it was becoming more popular. So I pursued an online learning degree at that time and three years later I had a bachelor’s degree in business and learned very quickly what it was going to take to be in an online environment. It’s not easy, but it affords you the flexibility to be able to work, care for your children, and pursue your dream of a degree.

Jon W: 08:52
Let’s talk about the pros and cons of online learning and what you took away from that at your Georgia College experience.

Georgiana: 09:02
I’m going to speak more to the pros than the cons. Their pros was that I was able to work it into my schedule. We still had deadlines, we still had assignments to do, we still had quizzes, we still had tests, but I was able to go to work, my nine to five job, still be able to take care of my kids, and set aside that time every day to study. And also I learned how to use my resources at the college as well as my professors, I was able to communicate with them either by phone or through a Skype meeting. So those were definitely the pros.

Georgiana: 09:55
Do I feel like I got the same value of education? Absolutely. I know what the in-class environment is like, and I know what the online environment is like. And I’m going to say that it’s not different at all.

Jon W: 10:11
And let’s talk about some of the technology that they have in place that you’re able to utilize during your studies.

Georgiana: 10:18
So each school is different. They each have their own technology as far as classroom time online. So some use Skype or some use their own technology or software that they built so that you can actually interact face-to-face with your professors and also with your classmates. So they would set aside some time or you could schedule time with your professor. The technology also included their library that was virtual. There was resources that each class would provide to you to make you successful in your learning and in your courses.

Jon W: 11:03
Folks, if you’re just tuning in to Lenz on Business, we’re chatting with Georgiana Simmons, she’s a graduate of Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business.

Jon W: 11:13
Now Georgiana we have less than a minute left in this segment, but I want to talk about how you applied your degree, how you apply your degree currently at Avanos Medical. Can you kind of start that and then we’ll finish it up in the next segment?

Georgiana: 11:27
Absolutely. Supply chain management, there are a lot of pieces to supply chain management that I have learned and I am still learning today. And what interests me about supply chain management, when I was in sourcing, I was sourcing raw materials. My interest is how do we now transform those raw materials into finished goods that customers actually want.

Jon W: 11:56
Well, we’re going to learn more about how you apply your knowledge that you learned at Georgia College in your current position at Avanos Medical.

Jon W: 12:03
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. We’ll be back with more Lenz on Business in just a few moments.
Richard L:
12:31
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon W: 13:09
We’re back at you with more business talk here on WSB with Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and our special guest this week is Georgiana Simmons. She’s a project manager in supply chain operations at Avanos Medical. Georgiana received her Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program. And you can learn more about that program at makeyournextmove.org.

Jon W: 13:32
Now Georgiana could you give us the lay person’s definition of supply chain operations, supply chain management?

Georgiana: 13:41
Okay, so supply chain management, the actual definition is the flow of goods and services to the consumer. What supply chain management means to me and my role is getting the right product to the right place at the right time to the right person. That is what supply chain management is.

Jon W: 14:07
And as I mentioned earlier, you received your Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program. And we were talking just before the break, how do you apply what you learned at the program, through the program, in your current job?

Georgiana: 14:25
Absolutely. So first let’s talk about the courses of supply chain management at Georgia College. It divides each section or the logistics of supply chain management and gives you a very in-depth look of strategies as well as principles of each section of supply chain management. So from project management to procurement with Dr. Monroe, who is the president of the program, to distribution strategies as well as warehousing and location strategies.

Georgiana: 15:16
So how I apply all of that learning to my position is I try to find those bottlenecks or I try to assist with increasing our ability to flow goods faster, and bring to customers what they want quicker. So that’s how I apply my learnings to supply chain management in my role.

Jon W: 15:47
Any particular course that really stood out to you that you feel like you draw upon the most?

Georgiana: 15:54
There’s actually two that come to mind. The first one is the procurement or raw material section that we had with Carl Monroe, and it was how to work with your suppliers, with raw materials, and your relationships with your suppliers, how to make it a win-win situation for you as the consumer and the supplier, as well as a distribution course that gave us an understanding of inventory and the strategies of inventory.

Jon W: 16:36
Interesting stuff here on Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. Don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and complete that form to get started.

Jon W: 16:58
I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and this week we’re chatting with Georgiana Simmons. She’s a graduate of Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business online program. We’re going to be hearing more from Georgiana and more Lenz on Business after news, weather and traffic right here on WSB.
Richard L:
17:20
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon W: 17:45
Welcome back to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse with more business talk for you. Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. You can learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

Jon W: 18:11
And if you’re just tuning in to the program this week we’re chatting with Georgiana Simmons. She’s a project manager in supply chain operations at Avanos Medical. The company Avanos Medical is a medical technology business focusing on delivering clinical medical device solutions. Georgiana received her master of logistics and supply chain management via Georgia College’s online program and you can learn more about that program at makeyournextmove.org.

Jon W: 18:41
Now Georgiana earlier in the program we were talking about the reason that you went back to school, the reason you went after your master’s degree and partial reason, it had to do with finances. You were a single parent and at the time in which you were attaining your master’s via Georgia College, you were working two jobs, experiencing a 70-hour work week, you told me this off the air, and you were able to fit in a graduate programs somehow.

Georgiana: 19:17
And that is the flexibility of online learning. That’s what it was able to afford me, was the ability to work it in. I definitely got less sleep during the 24-month program. However, it was that drive, it was wanting that master’s degree that drove me to successfully getting a 4.0 in my master’s program.

Jon W: 19:48
Congratulations.

Georgiana: 19:49
Yeah, thank you. Even with a 70-hour work week. I was fortunate, however, that my weekend job was a role where I was able to have my computer on the side and work on school while I was working. So I was working while I was working basically. But I do have to say that you have to discipline yourself. A robust discipline. You have to put yourself on a schedule. The way that the classes are structured is, you have reading that you have to do each week and there’s a lot of reading, there’s a lot of writing that you have to do for each week, there are quizzes and there are tests scheduled throughout, and there is also discussion posts. So that is the time that you go online and you discuss with other students the topics or that week’s readings, and there is a minimum set of requirements that you are to go on on there and not just post any discussion but something that is worthy of a grade.

Georgiana: 21:09
And so I had to set aside a schedule for myself at the beginning of each semester and say, okay, at this hour, at 5:00 in the morning I was going to get up and I was going to spend 30 minutes on discussion boards, and then I was gonna get ready and go to work, and then after work I was going to spend another hour on the reading. There were times where I would bring my lunch to work and so I could eat lunch at my desk as well as go online and again add more content to the discussion posts as well as study for quizzes.

Georgiana: 21:50
So I would say that Monday through Friday I was spending anywhere from two to two and a half hours of online work and then about-

Jon W: 22:03
Per day?

Georgiana: 22:04
Per day. And then on Saturday probably another four to five hours, and then Sunday I would take off.

Jon W: 22:10
Okay.

Georgiana: 22:11
Yep.

Jon W: 22:11
So you did have that day off, which is important to have our rest.

Georgiana: 22:13
I did have that day off, yeah.

Georgiana: 22:16
Absolutely. I was still working my second job on Sundays, but at least I was not looking at schoolwork on Sunday cause I did have to have some reprieve from that. But yes, I had to create a schedule for myself and stick to it or it was not going to work.

Jon W: 22:33
Wow. That’s impressive Georgiana.

Georgiana: 22:35
Thank you.

Jon W: 22:36
Folks you are listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and complete the form to get started.

Jon W: 22:58
I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. This week we’re chatting with Georgiana Simmons. She’s a graduate of Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business online program.

Jon W: 23:09
Now Georgiana, you were talking about the flexibility of online learning, and that helped you a lot in attaining this degree, but you had a 70-hour work week, which is really intense, and I can’t see how you did it. You explained how you did it. I don’t see how you did it. But on top of that, you’re a parent, a parent of four, and as a parent, I can’t imagine being a single parent, which you were at the time and doing all of this, working 70 hours a week, going back to school. Being a parent is a full time job, so basically you had three full time jobs.

Georgiana: 23:50
Yes.

Jon W: 23:51
So let’s talk about how you balanced parenting amidst this.

Georgiana: 23:56
Okay. So just I want to clarify. I actually have three children [crosstalk 00:24:02] in the household, four people in the house.

Jon W: 24:04
Oh four people in the household?

Georgiana: 24:06
Yes.

Jon W: 24:07
Okay, Gotcha, Gotcha.

Georgiana: 24:07
So I was fortunate that at the time that I decided to go back to school, my kids were teenagers and they were self sufficient. They were in high school and they were entering into college themselves. So it became a competition between my son and myself, who was going to graduate first. And fortunately he made it to the finish line before me. He got his Bachelor’s Degree in Information Technology, and then I graduated a year later. So it made it very easy for me to pursue my master’s degree at that time cause it was just the right timing.

Jon W: 24:48
Oh, that’s nice.

Georgiana: 24:48
Yeah, absolutely. But yes, still trying to hold down a job and help him pay for college and help myself pay for college as well as maintain a household of four people, keep the bills paid. And also my role requires about 40% travel and most of that being out of the country. Yes, it was definitely hard, but like I said, I disciplined myself, put myself on a schedule to make sure that I obtained the dream of getting a master’s degree.

Georgiana: 25:24
And I think the most important thing I’ve not revealed here is I wanted to be relevant in my industry. I found a passion for an industry that I wanted to stay in. I want to retire in supply chain management regardless of what portion, whether it was in raw material purchasing, manufacturing, or if it’s in distribution, I wanted to stay relevant in that industry, and so getting an APICS certification wasn’t enough for me, pursuing a master’s degree was more important. So that is the drive regardless of the 70 hours a week, and raising children in the home, that was the drive.

Jon W: 26:05
Where does that passion come from, supply chain management?

Georgiana: 26:10
I think it was being given the opportunity to source raw materials for a very important device that was being developed in a molecular biology lab that I was working in. I found out I loved the industry, but I also found out that I loved the work. Pursuing my dream to help in the healthcare industry one way or another, whether it was supply chain management, it was satisfaction for me. And now at Avanos Medical, I’m doing the same thing. I am assisting Avanos Medical to develop and to manufacture medical devices for patients that need closed-suction catheters in respiratory care, or they need MIC, which is a household name in digestive care, it’s a feeding tube, or for pain management, acute and chronic care, our household names are ON-Q Cue, I’m sorry, and COOLIEF. So that’s what keeps me in this industry and also keeps me in supply chain management, is bringing to patients the products that they need on time.

Jon W: 27:28
That’s a noble cause.

Georgiana: 27:29
Yep.

Jon W: 27:30
Folks, if you’re just tuning in to Lenz on Business, we’re chatting with Georgiana Simmons. She’s a graduate of Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business online program, and she currently works for Avanos Medical. She’s a project manager in supply chain operations.

Jon W: 27:47
And we were talking earlier about balancing parenting amidst working, amidst going back to school, et cetera, and you said one of your children was actually in college at the time?

Georgiana: 28:00
Yes.

Jon W: 28:00
Or started college, kind of started simultaneously almost?

Georgiana: 28:04
Yes.

Jon W: 28:04
And that had to bring some camaraderie between the two of you. I know you said there were some friendly competition, but I imagine that you said this all kind of happened at the right time. This was the right time for you to go back to school. I think a byproduct of that, it may have brought you two closer together, did it?

Georgiana: 28:21
Oh yeah, absolutely. Financially it may not have been the right time, but yeah, as far as my ability to now have a little more time for myself, this was the right time. And my son going to school, I was going through some of the same pains that he was going through. That first two years of your bachelor’s degree, you just don’t understand why you’re there and what the path is going to be. But yes, it was a blessing.

Jon W: 28:51
That’s great stuff. We are talking with Georgiana Simmons, a graduate of Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, and we’re going to be learning more from her just after the break. Don’t forget folks marketing matters and Lenz knows marketing, from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations. Think smart. Think creative. Think Lenz. Learn more at lenzmarketing.com. And you’re listening to the Lenz on Business here on WSB. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. We’ll be back in just a few moments.
Richard L:
29:30
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon W: 29:58
We’re back with more business talk here on WSB. You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by the J Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse and today we’ve been chatting with Georgiana Simmons. She’s a project manager in supply chain operations at Avanos Medical, and the company Avanos Medical is a medical technology company focusing on delivering clinical medical device solutions. Georgiana received her Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program. Learn more about that program at makeyournextmove.org.

Jon W: 30:39
Now Georgiana, let’s talk about the experience at Georgia College. You were talking about some of the courses earlier. Are there any stand out instructors or mentors that you met along the way?

Georgiana: 30:54
Professor Monroe, definitely, I think I’m saying his name wrong, Monroe, he is definitely memorable in the fact that he’s very passionate about supply chain management, and in particular he’s passionate about your relationships with your suppliers and how that does affect your ability to meet your customer’s expectations while putting strategies in place to make money.

Georgiana: 31:24
But if there was one supportive professor at Georgia College, it would have to be Peter Moore. Peter Moore had a couple of courses that he actually taught in supply chain management, but it was the project management course that I use today in my role. But he was a mentor and he’s been a champion since I have graduated. And I still look to him for advice. He offered the tools, he offered the knowledge and the principles behind project management in supply chain management, that is, I believe, will make me very successful.

Jon W: 32:10
So you have the ability to reach out to him when you have questions?

Georgiana: 32:14
Absolutely. All of them, they are all available. I can’t think of one that I wouldn’t be able to reach out to, to maybe run a question by or get their thoughts.

Jon W: 32:26
And the fellow students, the fellow graduates that you experienced this program with in your cohort, any relationships there that have continued post-graduation?

Georgiana: 32:36
Yup. So thank God for social media, because we’re all connected on LinkedIn. I think each cohort stays very close. They reach out whenever something new is happening in life, whether somebody’s got a new job or there’s a new job opening, they’re going to offer it to their comrades first, which is very nice. But yes, I do speak to a few of the students on a regular basis cause I just want to know how they’re doing in the industry and if I can ever offer any help or assistance in finding a role that they really want to be in.

Jon W: 33:16
Well Georgiana thank you so much for coming on the show this week. As I mentioned earlier, she is a project manager in supply chain operations at Avanos Medical. Thank you Georgiana again.

Georgiana: 33:28
Thank you Jon.

Jon W: 33:30
Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com. And make sure and check out our website for our library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s lenzonbusiness.com. And the whole shebang is sponsored by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. You can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org. I’m Jon Waterhouse, we’ll catch you next time on Lenz on Business.

Richard L:
34:18
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Alan Johnson and Dale Doss, graduates of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business

So you really want that masters degree in business, but you think it might be too late. It’s never too late to go back to school, and this week’s guests are living proof. Both Johnson and Doss decided to go after a masters degree in their mid-to-late 50s. Despite some trepidation, they not only graduated, but both rocked 4.0 grade point averages. They join guest host Jon Waterhouse and talk about what it was like jumping head first into Georgia College’s Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management online program and how it’s enhancing their careers.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for a Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz. On News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leaders’ inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: 00:26
You’ve always dreamed of getting a master’s degree to enhance your business career, but for one reason or another something kept getting in your way. Now, after all these years, the time is right, but you wonder if it’s too late to go back to school.

Welcome to Lenz On Business business talk on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting, College of Business. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’ll be hearing from two executives who decided to go back to school in their mid to late 50s. Despite some trepidation, they dove in and, not only graduated, but they both rocked 4.0 grade point averages and it changed their lives.

Here to share their stories, please welcome
Dale Doss. He’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson. He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm. Both
Alan and
Dale earned their master of logistics and supply chain management via Georgia College’s online program and they worked in the same cohort.

They’ll be talking about their experiences right here with us today. You can learn more about Georgia College’s graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Alan,
Dale, welcome to the show.

Alan Johnson: 01:51
Thank you. Glad to be here.

Dale Doss: 01:52
Good to be here.

Jon Waterhouse: 01:53
I think the most fascinating thing about both of your continuing business education stories is you each went back to school in your 50s. Most students go back for their master’s in their late 20s or early 30s. The theme of this week’s show is, it’s never too late to go back to school and do something to enhance your career. Let’s talk a little bit about that continuing education and the importance of it.

What do you guys think?

Dale Doss: 02:19
Yeah.
Jon, it’d been 30 years since I graduated with my undergraduate degree. It’s something that I had a hunger to do for a long, long time, but life had gotten in the way. There were things that happened.

On two occasion, I started to start an EMBA program and things happened and I think, well, most people will identify with stories, business situations happen, situations happened with families, but about 30 years later, I’d looked at it and said, “The time is now.”

In my case, it was sort of like that now-or-never type situation and I made the decision and it just so happens too that the Georgia College program came about about the right time for me and it aligned really well with my personal history and my goals and I was able to enroll and get started there.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:16

Alan, what about you? What led you to go to graduate school in your 50s?

Alan Johnson : 03:19
Well, for me, my wife is a retired school teacher. She has every degree known to man, I think, but it seemed like every time I got ready to go back, it was time for her to go back and get another degree. Then, after we got finished with that line, then the kids went to college. There was somebody always in school or in higher education in my family for quite some time.

Then, when all that got settled, I figured, “It’s my turn.” Then, like
Dale, I found the GCSU program that was attractive to me for … It could fit into my schedule and I had wanted to go back to graduate school for 25 years probably and finish an MBA and this program and the time commitments and everything lined up pretty good with where I was at in my career.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:11
Did either of you guys have any concern about going back to school more than 25 years after you first graduated? I mean, as executives, you both were working hard, you had families, but now it’s back to homework and projects on top of an already busy schedule.

Dale Doss: 04:27
Yeah. There were concerns. I’m not going to speak for
Alan, but I can tell you that the summer before I started the program, I had already pre-enrolled. I decided to go ahead and do a small sort of sampler class related to quantitative analysis. I think I ended up making a 70 on that first one, and I’m thinking to myself, “Do I really, really want to go back and do this?” I mean-

Alan Johnson : 04:51
And did … I’m sorry.

Dale Doss: 04:53
You go ahead, but the-

Alan Johnson : 04:54
Then the first class they throw at you, that Dr. Monroe and the team down there throw at you, is quantitative analysis. And so, that whole-

Jon Waterhouse: 05:01
That just makes my head hurt-

Alan Johnson : 05:02
Yeah, I was like, ”
Dale, I-

Jon Waterhouse: 05:04
… listening to you say the word.

Alan Johnson : 05:04
It had been 30 years since I had had anything, I used a little bit of quantitative analysis, statistical measures and things like that at work, but it had been years since I had played with that and that’s the very first class they throw at you. It took quite a bit of time to absorb all of that back into my brain and get it back going.

Dale Doss: 05:25
Yeah. I would suggest you’re a lot like me, but halfway through that first semester I was thinking to myself-

Alan Johnson : 05:31
What have I done? What have I done, yeah.

Dale Doss: 05:32
… “Really? Really? Can I really make it through this?” There were some doubts, but once you get started in something like that, you set a goal and you start setting the disciplines and you set the time aside, it starts playing upon itself and you start building some momentum, but the first part of it was difficult.

Jon Waterhouse: 05:51

Dale, just to go back a little bit about how you found out about the program, we want to give a little shout out to WSB, because I believe it was because of a commercial?

Dale Doss: 05:59
Yeah. I was on my way. I was in the commute like everybody else here in Atlanta and the traffic … It was around 6:30 AM or something like that in the early morning. I was on my way to my job and heard the commercial and I was already thinking about, whether it was going to be doing an EMBA program or something of that nature.

Then the commercial came on, and I’m thinking, “That sounds like it’s perfect for me.” Then, “There’s some research to be done on the backside of it,” but the more and more I researched, the more and more I found out that it was the right thing. But, yes, it started with a commercial I heard on WSB.

Alan Johnson: 06:34
I, as well, heard it on WSB. That’s how I got mine. Then, like
Dale, I went back and I researched it through the internet and things like that and decided, “This is the program for me.”

Jon Waterhouse: 06:43
Right now you’re on and everyone is listening to WSB, Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and this week we’re chatting with a pair of graduates of Georgia College’s online graduate business program,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson.

Now, guys, you both register for graduate school and your classes are online. When you were originally in college, the internet didn’t even exist as it does today. Did you have some concern about online learning?

Alan Johnson : 07:29
No, I didn’t. Not really. I had some misconceptions about online learning. I thought, “Well, it’s online, so it’s going to be easier.” Nothing could be further from the truth.

Dale Doss: 07:39
No.

Alan Johnson : 07:39
The online learning to me is, for me personally, it was more in-depth. I had to do more work, more research, more independent work to find out answers to questions rather than going to a class or calling Dr. Monroe, Dr. Wiggins, and finding out, “How do I do this?” It was far more challenging from a work-time perspective than I thought it would be, but in the flip side of that, as far as time management, it was a little bit easier to manage my time, because I didn’t have to be somewhere at any certain time of the day.

Dale Doss: 08:15
Yeah. I didn’t have any idea how the program would actually play out from a standpoint of online, but when we went down to the orientation in Milledgeville, I was able to see for the first time, how things were going to play out. We’re immersed in the same technologies all the time. We’re using this stuff on the job all the time, whether it’s mobile or internet-based, or a lot of email traffic and things of that nature.

It’s not like it’s cutting-edge technology to us, because we’re using it every day in our jobs. To do it in an education standpoint was unique to me and was something that was new. Coming from where we came from, when I graduated in ’85 and back further than that, education was, oftentimes, more of where you sat down in there sort of, but download from an instructor, you absorb everything you can, you retain what you can and you test on it.

In this particular case, on the online program, there was a great deal more investment of myself personally into the process. I’m not going to say it was self-taught, because that’s not the case at all. I mean, we had a lot of collaborative effort, a lot of team effort, a lot of interaction with our teachers and professors who were, by the way, located around the globe in some places like Hawaii and south Georgia and different places.

Jon Waterhouse: 09:42
Wow.

Dale Doss: 09:42
But, it’s a different type of learning environment for someone that didn’t come up that way. You’re correct in assuming that it would be different, but it was one that … actually I’ve become a great deal more comfortable with, because it required your own personal investment into it. No one was sitting there downloading into you and investing into you. You’re investing into yourself and, personally, I think the learning experience, the retention rates and things that I saw coming out of it were a great deal better.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:15
I was going to ask you that, because you were talking about, it required you to dig deeper and really invest yourself.

Alan Johnson : 10:22
One thing to me that’s unique about the online learning experience, and I make this comment, Dr. Monroe has asked me to come back a couple times and speak to new cohorts coming in, and one thing I tell them is, “Your objective and how you will get through these problems a lot better is you learn more from the other people in your cohort than you ever do from Dr. Monroe, Dr. Williams and the different professors in the program.”

That’s the thing where you can learn so much more from each other. I learned so much from
Dale, because his expertise in the field of logistics is different from mine and I learned far more than I want to know about international transportation from
Dale, and he probably learned more about domestic transportation from me than he ever wanted to learn, but the key is learning from each other.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:10
Let’s talk about time management. You did say that that was something that you really saw as advantageous to online learning. How did you manage your time and shuffle about around a little bit?

Dale Doss: 11:21
It takes some discipline, because in the same way I said you’re investing, instead of someone downloading with you in a classroom environment where you know you have to be at a classroom at 8:30, 7:30, whatever the case may be, you have to discipline yourself. In my particular case, I’m not going to speak for
Alan, but I was home every evening between 6:30 and seven o’clock. My family knew that my time was sort of off limits. I basically went to my office at home and spent time there from seven till 10 o’clock every evening. Pretty much Monday through Friday.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:55

Alan, when we come back, I want to hear about your time management techniques.

You’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse, and we’re chatting with
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson, graduates of Georgia College’s online business program. Speaking of Georgia College, it’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. We’ll be back with more Lenz on Business in just a moment.
Richard Lenz: 12:32
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business. Presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 13:02
On this week’s Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, we’re learning a valuable lesson about continuing business education, it’s never too late. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and we’re chatting with
Dale Doss. He’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson.

He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm. Both
Alan and
Dale earned their Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program. They actually worked in the same cohort, and you can learn more about Georgia College’s graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now,
Alan, tell me a little bit more about your time management techniques when it came to your online studies.

Alan Johnson : 13:56
They tell you when you come into the program that it’s not hard, but it’s rigorous. That is a very, very, I think, accurate description of the program. It does require a good amount of time, but it is manageable if you budget your time. I tried, personally, to get as much done as I could throughout the week. Lunch times, I would come in early for work, matter of fact,
Dale and I did a lot of stuff early in the morning. We would talk 5:30, six o’clock in the morning a lot of times and-

Jon Waterhouse: 14:27
Wow.

Dale Doss: 14:27
A lot of cell phone calls while we were driving.

Alan Johnson : 14:29
Cell phone calls in the car and that sort of stuff, as well as some other people in the cohort, but I tried to get as much work done throughout the week as I could. That meant sometimes working till midnight or later, writing papers, reading articles, reading our textbooks or whatever, and tried my best to have my weekends as free as possible to give to my family. I think
Dale worked more weekends than I did.

Dale Doss: 14:58
Yeah. I worked a pretty good bid on Saturday and Sunday. I mean, I found the investment of time, once again, once you get into the program, the investment was driven by the attainment in the learnings in the objectives and the syllabuses that are set out for you for each one of the courses. Investment had to be steady every evening.

I can’t think of too many nights I took off and then I worked a lot on weekends and a lot of it was driven by, was the project due? Why did you have to do, how much collaboration did you need, and we got it done. It was a significant investment of time. Those that are to think about going into the program, need to at least understand that you do need some self-discipline and you do need to schedule some time.

Alan Johnson : 15:44
I would say, plan that ahead, plan that ahead before you go into the program. As far as when you’re going to spend your time investing into this program.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:54
You both earned your Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
Dale, I understand you have a great love for supply chain. Why is that?

Dale Doss: 16:02
I started off in late 80s, excuse me. In the 90s I worked for almost nine years with Walmart, growing up in that organization in the supply chain area and had a chance to get involved in global activities in China back in, that was back in 1994 …

Jon Waterhouse: 16:24
Wow.

Dale Doss: 16:25
… with Walmart. To me, it’s just a field that allows you to experience a lot of cultural things that you just flat out can’t experience in other business positions, so that’s one of the things I love about it.

Jon Waterhouse: 16:40
Fascinating. Fascinating. You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and complete the form to get started.

I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re talking with a pair of graduates of Georgia College’s online graduate business program,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson. We’ll be back for more Lenz on Business after news, weather and traffic right here on WSB.
Richard Lenz: 17:20
Hi. This is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 17:47
Welcome back to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business, and it’s never too late to go back to school and this week’s guests are living proof.

These two executives decided to go back to school in their mid to late 50s and, despite some trepidation, they dove in and, not only graduated, but both rocked 4.0 grade point averages. We’re talking with
Dale Doss, he’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson. He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm.

Both
Alan and
Dale earned their Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program and they worked in the same cohort. We’re going to be talking about their experiences for the rest of the program. You can learn more about Georgia College’s graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now, fellas, at the executive level, I imagine it feels like you know quite a lot already. Did you guys feel like, “Hey, what could I possibly learn at this point in my career”?

Dale Doss: 19:12
I mean, there’s a part of me that thought that I’m going to sign up for this program, I’m going to sign my name and I’m going to get a piece of paper. I mean, because you’ve been in a field for a long time, you’re going back to get a master’s degree in the field after you’ve served or worked in that field for 20-plus years, and you’re thinking to yourself, “Yeah, they’re going to teach me a lot. Really?”

Then you get into it and the more you peel it back, the more that you find out that there are a lot of things you know, there’s a lot of textbook stuff that you could repeat, that you could teach, maybe, even to a certain point, but what you find out is, is that old Covey term of sharpening the saw. It’s that seventh habit where you go back and you just keep drilling on things.

I mean, it’s really good to take it in over almost two years and to go back and revisit everything that you’re doing because, what you do in business oftentimes is you keep doing more and more about less and less, so you become an expert at certain things. You refine and you hone those skills, but then you get into a situation in this course where you see things from a much broader perspective.

It’s just a fantastic learning environment to go back and revisit. One of the things that you cannot underestimate is the amount of impact it will make on how you view, all of a sudden, your work life again and how you change your view on how you see the problems that you’re working through in the office as well.

Jon Waterhouse: 20:49

Alan, did you feel the same?

Alan Johnson : 20:50
Yeah. Like I had mentioned before, not that I didn’t learn a lot from Dr. Monroe in the faculty there, I did, and I’m still continuing to learn from Dr. Monroe as I mentioned earlier, I think, to you
Jon privately, but working on some projects now with Dr. Monroe, so I continue to learn from him, but I learned as much or more from
Dale and the other members of the cohort as I did from, as
Dale said, the textbook sharpening the saw.

The basic classes, the logistics supply chain stuff, I do that. I’ve been doing it, it’s like drinking water for me, but when we got into the more analytical part of different business cases and things like that, then it became challenging and that’s some of the areas where I really learned a lot is when we would work together as a group on different business cases and some of them were quite challenging. The Penguin Publishing one was interesting.

Jon Waterhouse: 21:52
Now, let’s talk about Dr. Carl Monroe. We had him on the program a little while back. He’s a Georgia College professor and also the Director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program. Off the air, both of you referred to him as a legend in the industry.

Dale Doss: 22:10
His involvement in the program, to me, once I heard the commercial on WSB and I’ve started researching the program, his involvement in the program legitimized the program from my standpoint and gave me confidence that I was going to be participating in a program that would be a professional enhancement to me.

Alan Johnson : 22:29
Yeah. I will rehash what
Dale said, but one thing about Carl to me, or Dr. Monroe, to me that’s impressive is, you see a lot of guys in the academic world, but a lot of the guys in the academic world cannot relate to private business and to industry and what’s going on. Carl has a unique sense of what’s going on in the economic environment of the country.

Globally, how the stuff that he teaches applies every day. I’ll say this about Dr. Monroe, a lot of the guys that I see in that, they take it as a job. Carl takes it as a passion, and he genuinely cares about his students and he genuinely cares about whether they learned something or not. It was a fantastic experience under him and I couldn’t have asked for anything any better to learn under him.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:20
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and this week we’re chatting with a pair of graduates of Georgia College’s online graduate business program,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson.

Now, guys, you are also talking about the cohort and the kind of educational osmosis, if you will, that you were experiencing learning from each other in the group. You guys became, not only friends, but comrades in the program, working together, phone calls early in the morning talking and now, from what I’ve understood off the air when you were explaining that you guys often draw upon each other now after graduation, post-program, asking questions, business advice, et cetera.

Can you explain the cohort and the importance of that in this program?

Alan Johnson : 24:24
Going as a cohort, I looked around and
Dale and I were, obviously by far, the oldest people in the cohort. That had a natural attraction. He and I becoming, not only partners in this venture, but also we’re friends outside of that and have remained friends, but I looked around the cohort and all these young people and I was like, the surprising thing to me is like, “What can I learn from this young female in a cohort?”

Man, I was blown away. I mean, these kids are sharp. They are really sharp and I learned a lot from the cohort, the younger people in the cohort, as much as I did from
Dale. It was a great experience in working in the different teams, working with different people from different industries, age groups, different backgrounds, a real learning experience. It was great.

Dale Doss: 25:12
I was impressed with the younger classmates, a lot of them were dealing with family conflicts and scheduling and young families and things that I had used as excuses to put off mine, going back to school.

Alan Johnson : 25:25
I think we had three babies born in our cohort, in the two years in the cohort.

Dale Doss: 25:30
I think you’re right. I put my education off for a while and here we were surrounded by people who were plowing right through and they were dealing with the distractions of life and going forward with it. That was impressive to me. I felt an obligation, as someone who was older within the cohort, to make sure too that we were sharing our experiences and, like you said, we learned a lot from people of all ages in the cohort.

I think it was that virtual classroom. The one thing you asked earlier about the difference of what we expected with the technology and learning environment. That was one of the things that did surprise me quite a bit as the class unfolded was, there was a lot more collaboration versus independent learning.

Jon Waterhouse: 26:21
Let’s talk about how this experience has enhanced your careers going forward.

Alan Johnson : 26:27
Well, I have always had a goal of teaching in college. I didn’t want to teach high school, and I’ve had that opportunity. I haven’t reacted to it or done it yet. I’ve had the opportunity to teach a couple of classes, I just haven’t done it yet, but also wanting to do some business consulting.

In the consulting world and the industry that we’re in, a master’s degree is pretty much required and it is, obviously, required to teach on the college level. That was my two main focuses or my two main reasons for going into the program and it’s allowed me to do some things today that I’d never would’ve been able to do. I would have been doing the same thing I had been doing for years, and that was managing logistics and supply chain organizations.

Dale Doss: 27:17
I would go back to the point on my involvement was, it was a personal goal of mine and not that I just checked off one of my goals, but it was something that I hungered to do and wanted to do very badly and was able to get it done. But from an experience standpoint, it definitely enhanced the way I approach my work. It gave me a great deal more …

It allowed me to think differently as I approached the business on a daily basis. It allowed me to sort of step back and see the business in a much more strategic way. Once again, we’re so often dealing with details and details and details on our daily basis, in our work. It allowed me to step back and see things a lot more strategic.

Alan Johnson : 28:01
For me, it allowed me to think more outside the box. You do the same thing every day and you don’t get a different perspective of how things can work, but being in a cohort, going through the master’s program, it has taught me now to rely on other resources for information as I come into a project and things like that. The value to me also has been this bank of resources that I have, and a different way that I think about things.

Jon Waterhouse: 28:27
You were mentioning earlier, and I brought it back up, about the connections that you made and how you can apply those connections in the business world today.

Alan Johnson : 28:36
Right. We were talking about earlier,
Dale is a expert in international logistics. I’ve done it before, but he knows 10 times more than I do, so if I’ve got something that comes up in my world about international logistics, I pick up the phone and I call
Dale.

Dale Doss: 28:53
Yeah. I recently had a situation where I needed some advice related to transportation and transportation tracking and I went out to
Alan, texted him, and said, “Hey, let’s talk.” You learn that there’s people within the program that you can call on and that you can get advice and use as a screening tool.

Jon Waterhouse: 29:15
We are going to be getting some more advice from
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson. It’s never too late to go back to school and enhance your business career.

You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s, J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget Marketing Matters and Lenz Knows Marketing from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations. Think smart. Think creative. Think Lenz. Learn more L-E-N-Zmarketing.com. This is
Jon Waterhouse. You’re listening to Lenz on Business, we’ll be back in just a moment.
Richard Lenz: 29:53
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business Presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:20
You’re locked in the Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and this week we’ve been talking with
Dale Doss. He’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson. He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm. Both
Alan and
Dale, they earned their Master of Logistics and Supply chain management via Georgia College’s online program.

They worked in the same cohort and we’ve been talking about their experiences in the graduate school program, the online program, and you can learn more about Georgia Colleges’ graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now, guys, now that it’s done and you’re taking that application, you’re using it in your careers, was the online graduate business program at Georgia College worth it? Was it worth the blood, the sweat, the tears, the time?

Dale Doss: 31:21
It was worth it. It wasn’t an investment that I felt had to be made on my part. It was a hunger that I had to finish, but in the end I got so much more out of it than I expected than just crossing off a to-do list item.

Alan Johnson : 31:37
Yeah. Same with me. I got far more out of it than I thought. We ask about the program and another thing that was very attractive to me was the affordability of it. When you compared it to other programs, and the fact that it’s got Dr. Monroe’s name on it, it’s extremely affordable and I think that it was a good investment of my time, energies and resources to get it done.

Jon Waterhouse: 32:03
You guys have been in the industry for many years, 25-plus years, I believe. Now you’ve taken the course, you’ve gotten your masters, how have you seen logistics and supply chain change through the years?

Alan Johnson : 32:15
Yeah. One of the things that’s always been a thing that I’ve seen in theme and many years in supply chain, and I came out of Auburn University with a degree in industrial management, there was no logistics degree and migrated into the logistics field. The logistics field forever has been dominated by 50-something-year-old white men like
Dale and I. I’ve always wanted the industry to be …

I always thought that the industry needed to be more diverse, with more women, more minorities, that sort of stuff into the field and into the industry. And I’m seeing it change, I really am. I’m seeing it change and it’s very refreshing to see these women in supply chain. I think
Dale had a young woman he hired at another company that was extremely sharp, and some of the women that were in the program. My encouragement to people, young women and … we need that in this industry. We need that in the industry, with different ideas and different focuses.

Dale Doss: 33:16
The industry’s changing like a lot of industries. One thing that you have to keep your eyes on is technology. Just like we talked about technology related to the school, in this particular program, technology within the industry, especially information sharing, blockchain, there’s so many things that are out there on the horizon. It’s become a technology-driven field. It’s not just the matter of people moving products physically, it’s a matter of moving information along with products and the whole industry has progressed and changed along with technology.

Jon Waterhouse: 33:48
Great perspective from our special guest today. Thanks so much to Georgia College business grads,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson, for hanging out with us this week. Lens on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Like Chris and his team help build your financial future, visit dynamicmoney.com, and don’t forget to check out our website for our library of past shows lenzonbusiness.com.

That’s L-E-N-Zonbusiness.com. Of course, the whole shebang brought to you by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. You can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and fill out the form to get started. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse. We will see you next week on Lenz on Business.
Richard Lenz: 34:47
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.

Jared Powell, Center for Disease Control, graduate of the online MMIS program at Georgia College

What happens when you’re in the midst of earning your masters degree in business and the on-campus program changes into an online program? This happened to Georgia College graduate Jared Powell. Powell, who earned his Master of Management Information Systems degree, talks to guest host Jon Waterhouse about the differences between on-campus and online learning, how online studies enhanced his communication skills, and how his degree prepared him for his current work in the office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz On Business with Richard Lenz on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leaders, inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: 00:24
What happens when you’re in the midst of earning your master’s degree in business and the on campus program changes midstream into an online program? It might mean you’re in store for some educational culture shock, but it may also mean you’ll be experiencing higher learning in ways you couldn’t imagine. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and welcome to another edition of Lenz On Business here on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. Here to tell us about his online business master’s degree experience is Jared Powell. Jared received his bachelor’s degree in Rhetoric from Georgia College and for graduate school, he returned to Georgia College and entered what would become the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business online program. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree, and today he works in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Welcome, Jared. How you doing?

Jared Powell: 01:30
I’m doing well. How are you doing, Jon?

Jon Waterhouse: 01:31
Doing great. Now this is of course a business show, and we’re going to talk about your business master’s degree experience in just a bit, which actually you got through Georgia College, but you also went to Georgia College for undergrad. Why Georgia College?

Jared Powell: 01:47
Well, Milledgeville is my hometown. They call it being a local or a mocal in Milledgeville, and I honestly loved the campus. It was beautiful there. I knew a lot of people that worked there and it just had that smaller setting that I liked, and just had a great opportunity to interact with professors and learn a lot through those interactions. So I figured, you know what, I’ll stick around here.

Jon Waterhouse: 02:15
And you got your undergrad at Georgia College. What sort of need did you feel to go back to school to get your masters?

Jared Powell: 02:23
After having a little bit of struggle looking for … or in the, I guess the major workforce after graduating from undergrad, I decided that I needed to expand my skill set some more, other than just having a Rhetoric degree, which most people don’t know what that is. So, I-

Jon Waterhouse: 02:39
What is a Rhetoric degree?

Jared Powell: 02:40
So Rhetoric is speech writing, communication, primarily those, and people who get that major for undergrad end up going towards law, theology. So it … For me, it really didn’t work out that way, and that was fine, and it ended up being a good compliment to my master’s degree, which we’re going to get into it.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:01
And again, why did you want your master’s degree? I know you have a tech mind.

Jared Powell: 03:06
Right, I do. I’ve always been into technology, whether it be through early on video production in my undergrad, and then even earlier than that in high school and middle school. I’ve always had just a passion for learning new things, playing with new technology. And so I figured, “Hey, why don’t I make a career out of that?”.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:24
And you chose the concentration of master in Management Information Systems. Now
Jared, I have to be honest, I have a general idea of what that means. Technology, programming, and how businesses use information to improve the company’s operations, but can you explain the full scope of that field of study?

Jared Powell: 03:44
Well, yeah, I can do the best that I can. It’s hilarious to me because management, or Masters of Management Information Systems is such a mouthful anyways, so trying to get it out is crazy to me, but it’s such a large scope. I mean, primarily from what my hands on with it was, was learning the basics to learning organizational communication, learning about SQL, which is Structured Query Language, learning about enterprise management systems, which I mean, that’s a big portion of what MMIS is, is learning how to use those skills in an organizational setting and that’s what they give us the tools to do.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:24
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online, and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org, and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re talking with Jared Powell, an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now
Jared, so you start earning your Master’s in Business at Georgia College and they’re in the middle of the program, it switches from classroom study to an online program. Let’s talk about that transition of going from face-to-face to online learning. Was that jarring at all?

Jared Powell: 05:21
For me it was a little different, because I felt like I learned better in a classroom setting, and just having that interaction, the physical interaction, which I think a lot of people would agree with. But it was interesting to transition because we had a couple of classes that would meet one week face-to-face, and then one week online. So it was kind of testing the waters, and I got used to it, because we had to post in forums, that sort of thing, to really communicate with the class. But once we went fully online, it was just like jumping in the deep end and you just kind of had to run with it. But it was fun, because it was something totally new. We got to play with all kinds of newer technology for like labs, and that sort of thing, to really get interactive in the classroom.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:01
Can you talk about some ways that you adapted to that new format of online learning?

Jared Powell: 06:05
Oh sure. I feel like I’m better at vocalizing myself face-to-face, or just like having a conversation with someone, and I really had to, I guess, teach myself how to take that and type it into a small blank and really explain concepts, or things that we were talking about in the classroom, and then have to comment on other people’s thoughts and posts in our online discussion panels. So that was unique, because for me, I’m like, “Okay, I only have like one or two things to say if I type it, but if I’m talking, I could talk all day.”.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:40
And do you think that made you a stronger communicator?

Jared Powell: 06:43
I believe so. I think it helped me to be more direct and to just also be able to, I guess, give constructive criticism to my classmates and not be, I guess, too direct.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:58
So you were talking a little bit about the differences between online and classroom learning. Can you kind of expand on that a little bit? Any other differences that you noticed?

Jared Powell: 07:09
Well, we just had to learn how to be in an online classroom where we would meet in … I believe it was WebEx was the program we used, and that’s like an online classroom where you can come in and you can see the video and audio feed from your professor. So you actually get to see them. It’s not like you’re just staring into the void and listening to someone ramble on, but you … so that was interesting, because you’d see your classmates. Sometimes somebody wouldn’t mute the mic, and they might be eating a little dinner or something, so that. Those were like … some of the growing pains we had to learn through in the process. But other than that it was, it was pretty fun and a pretty smooth transition. I don’t know if any other of my classmates had any issues. I’d never really heard anybody complain about it, so …

Jon Waterhouse: 07:51
So what are some of the biggest misconceptions of online learning, maybe some that you had that were dispelled once you started experiencing it?

Jared Powell: 07:59
I think some of the main ones are, “Well if it’s online, I’m going to be isolated,” or, “If it’s online, I’m going to not really be able to have a relationship with my professor, and really get to know this person” and I don’t think that was necessarily true. And in my case, and in the case of my fellow students in the program, we had plenty of opportunities to talk to our professors and to … he invited … he and she invited us to meet with them in their office if we wanted to come to campus to meet up with them, which lucky for me, I worked on campus, so I could just go right upstairs. But, they had an open door policy, even in the online space. They say, “Any time you want to call, anytime you want to come by,” they were willing to do that.

And that really made it special, because I liked that aspect about Georgia College in my undergrad and it felt like it just carried right on over into the Master’s program of open door policy, please come by and chat. And I think also having relationship with students of being able to connect with your peers to study, to grow, and to learn, and maybe even collaborate on projects together. We were required to do that. We had many a project where we would have to do those sort of things. So, they almost reinforced it a little bit to … so you don’t feel so isolated, and it’s not just a solo gig.

Jon Waterhouse: 09:15
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Jared Powell an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now Jared, you were talking about communicating with fellow students and that comradery. In what ways there in the online program were you able to communicate, outside of just traditional email? What ways did you all get creative as far as collaborating during studies?

Jared Powell: 09:52
Well, we definitely had to use Skype sessions, or also use WebEx sessions. They opened up lobbies for us, so we could have those interactions with students if we wanted to enter a space like that.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:04
What are lobbies?

Jared Powell: 10:05
A lobby is just essentially a room online where you can log in and basically use the same setting that you would use for the classroom, but use it for collaborating with students, and the professor may or may not be there. We also had breakout sessions in the classroom too where the professor would open up multiple lobbies and we’d be able to chat together, the same way you would chat pretty much via like Skype or a video conferencing, maybe FaceTime, whatever you’re familiar with. And we had to use that a good many times, because some of our classmates weren’t in the same city as us or maybe not even in the same state. So that was pretty interesting to kind of experience that and have to work around not being able to meet up face-to-face all the time with our fellow classmates.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:48
So you never ever really felt you were on an island?

Jared Powell: 10:50
I never did, no. I mean I’m a pretty social butterfly, but I know a lot of my classmates are … there’s a few in there that were maybe a little bit more introverted, and even then we had … I would just engage with them and make sure like, “Hey, we’re here,” and I think that would be the encouragement I would say to anyone out there who’s maybe hesitant about getting into the master’s program, or online program, just give it a shot and put yourself out there to really interact with your fellow students.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:17
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business right here on WSB. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including the MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. You can learn more at gcsu.edu/business, and we’re going to be learning more about the program from one of the program’s graduates,
Jared Powell an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program at Georgia College. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse. You’re locked into Lenz On Business on WSB. We’ll be back with more in just a few moments. (singing).

Richard Lenz: 12:08
Hi, this is Richard Lens, and you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 12:35
If you want business talk, we’ve got it here on Lenz On Business, on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Jared Powell. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree online from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, and today he works in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Now Jared, let’s talk about time management, when it comes to online studies and how did you use time management to your advantage during your experience studying online at Georgia College?

Jared Powell: 13:17
Okay, well I was a part-time employee for the school, but I also did a lot in the afternoons, so time management was crucial, trying to figure out … I was very busy in my master’s program, but really I would have to schedule time with my friends that were in the program with me to meet up in the … like I said earlier, in those online sessions, and really just have to team up together and find the time to work on some of these projects, because honestly some of the stuff was a little difficult coming into it, not really knowing how to do certain aspects of the class. These guys that were in the program with me came into it from the undergrad, and they had already done this.

Jon Waterhouse: 14:02
You had a bit of a flexible schedule, but you also had like two part time jobs.

Jared Powell: 14:06
Yeah, my schedule was pretty flexible, but the two part time jobs really kind of made that time limited. So trying to figure out the time of the afternoon or the evenings to really go into the program and start to maybe do the online sessions, to meet up with classmates, or to comment on other people’s posts in our online environment, that was tough, because sometimes it would feel like, “Okay, if I don’t get this done tonight, it’s going to be overwhelming tomorrow,” you know? So that was a little tough to navigate at first, but once I got the hang of it, it started to become a little bit easier, and I had a little method to the madness.

Jon Waterhouse: 14:46
So if someone were to say to you that they wouldn’t have time to tackle an online degree, what would you say? Is it for everyone?

Jared Powell: 14:53
I would say it’s for everyone. If you can build a schedule for yourself and just say, “All right, I’m going to do this much tonight, and I’ll do this much tomorrow, and then go off of that,” I think you can start having the building blocks to really have good time management. I mean, I’m having to learn that right now with my little puppy of having that schedule again, you know? So I think, really you can do anything you set your mind to, and this program isn’t overwhelmingly difficult to … I mean, I understand that people that are coming into this are full time employees, maybe parents, maybe someone who is very busy, but they make it doable is what I’m trying to say.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:32
Does it take a great deal of discipline?

Jared Powell: 15:34
I would say, yeah. Learning takes a great deal of discipline in any environment. So I think if you can really set your mind to it, and really put yourself to the test and say, “You know what? I’m going to do this,” and be determined, I think you can really achieve it.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:49
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started, I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse. This week we’re chatting with Jared Powell, an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. He’s giving us a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to study business online, and we’ll be back for more after news, weather and traffic here on WSB.

Richard Lenz: 16:41
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business. (singing).

Jon Waterhouse: 17:07
Welcome back to Lenz On Business here on WSB. I’m your guest host, Jon Waterhouse, Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs including the MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. And this week we’re chatting with
Jared Powell. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree online from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, and today he’s putting it to use by working in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Now
Jared, we were talking about your experience, your online learning experience at Georgia College. Let’s talk about some of the projects you experienced during your Master in Management Information Systems program. What sort of real world scenarios did they drop you all into?

Jared Powell: 18:10
So they dropped us into a couple of cool ones. Primarily one I’m thinking of in particular, was a class where we had to build an app around local business, or something that could be used for everyday use. Ours was for a local business that was a fabric company for quilts, and it was based out of Milledgeville. So, It was to help them in the order process to show off any of their product. And so, we built this app together as a team, and we had to go through this whole, I guess, project management side of things together, which gave us a cool piece of that puzzle of Management Information Systems. And it was interesting. I mean, I never had to build an app before, and really tag teaming with … I think we had about five or six people on our team, and really kind of learning how to use the software to build the application, and to also make sure it wasn’t terrible. It was a pretty fun process. I mean, it’s really cool to see really what’s behind that, that building process.

Jon Waterhouse: 19:12
And everyone on the team had a different responsibility?

Jared Powell: 19:15
Oh yeah, everyone on the team had a different responsibility. We used this tool called Scrum, and it’s a newer project management tool that is pretty popular right now, and we got to use that tool and also apply it to the application building process. So it was pretty interesting to take what we were learning from that, and also learn how to build an application together. So we’re kind of doing a tag team of learning together.

Jon Waterhouse: 19:42
So that was a great example of how you collaborated with other students. I understand online learning often attracts a diverse group of students. You were, I believe 25, 26 when you were studying. What about the rest of your classmates? What sort of melting pot did you have there?

Jared Powell: 19:58
Oh man. We had all kinds of people come into the program. We had older folks, who are maybe parents, who have been in the industry for a long time, but are looking to maybe advance themselves a little bit more. We had people who were pregnant. We had people who were international students. We … I mean you name it, we had it. It was amazing, I … and it honestly prepared me when I came to the CDC, because the CDC is so diverse, and there’s people from all kinds of backgrounds there, and I didn’t realize that when I came into … and not … it was awesome just to be like, “Okay, cool. This is just like my Master’s program.”

Jon Waterhouse: 20:40
And what did you learn from some of the older students in the program? What sort of perspectives did they share with you that kind of enlightened you in the field?

Jared Powell: 20:48
It was interesting, because they brought in experiences from their workplace and just showed us like real world examples in the classroom, something that we may not necessarily get in a undergrad degree. In a Master’s program, you get people who come in and say, “Well, this is how we did it in our office, but I see how we can do it differently, and how we can bring change into a work environment.” And it was cool to see them apply the things that we were learning in the classroom, and then come back and say, “This worked. This didn’t work.” So to see the real world application of it was something I don’t think I would get anywhere else.

Jon Waterhouse: 21:24
And to hear these real world experiences from folks who are out there in the field, did that help reinforce you that, hey, I made the right choice to study this field?

Jared Powell: 21:34
Oh, absolutely. I think that just really drove it home for me, because I’m like, “Okay, these people are working in the industry and really seen change from the things that they’re learning,” so it was awesome.

Jon Waterhouse: 21:48
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business right here on WSB. It’s presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university, and don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse. This week, we’re talking with Jared Powell. He’s actually an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now Jared, off the air, you explained to me that the program didn’t end when it was over. Can you kind of elaborate on that?

Jared Powell: 22:35
It was awesome to have that experience, like I said earlier about really having that open door policy, and it wasn’t closed after we graduated. Dr. Getty, who is my advisor for the program, she’s also the head of the department for that Master’s in Management Information Systems, and she really helped refine my resume and help kind of guide me into, “Hey, maybe you should apply to jobs here. Maybe you should look here,” because at the time I was unemployed after I graduated. And so, she was really great about trying to help me figure out where I wanted to go next, like, “What was the next step? Where do you want to go, and what do you want to do with this degree?” I didn’t know. And so, she really helped narrow that down for me. It was really special.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:23
And what about other students? Have you kept in contact with some of the classmates from the program, and have they given you any additional advice along the way now that you’re at the CDC?

Jared Powell: 23:32
I would say, yeah. I’ve kept up with them, we’ve touched base, but really I’ve seen their careers kind of take off, and they’re going in crazy directions, and it’s interesting just to see the guys who were the same age as me that were going through the program, end up getting married, and having families together, and really just going off into this field that is so huge, and continuously growing. I wouldn’t … I don’t know if they necessarily have given me any feedback, but it’s just cool to … for me as a student and a graduate from this program to see it take off and go into some impressive directions.

Jon Waterhouse: 24:12
And you, yourself, moved into an impressive direction. You have a job in the Chief Information Security Office of the CDC. Can you talk about some of the practical applications that you’ve been able to use your degree in your job at the CDC?

Jared Powell: 24:26
Absolutely. I would say that a lot of what I’ve learned from this program and brought into the CDC was organizational communication, really learning what it takes to chat one-on-one with people who have a larger skill set than me, or people who know more than me, or people who are higher up in the organizational chain. And really just because we had so much software and technology coming at us, we had to be quick to learn what, what was being thrown at us in the program, and going into the CDC, some of the tools I had not necessarily seen before. So it was cool to say, “You know what? I learned this so quickly in this program. I got this.” It equipped me to be able to tackle some of the challenges that I experienced when I came in, and I felt like I have only been better for it because of this program.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:22
So in Management Information Systems, you’ve got to be able to stay on top of the latest tech?

Jared Powell: 25:27
Absolutely, absolutely.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:28
In what ways do you do that?

Jared Powell: 25:30
Really, staying up to date with what’s going on in the news, I feel like I have to constantly check out what’s going … like, what’s coming out, what … maybe what Google is doing, what is the latest software security out there? And firewalls, it just depends on … I mean, because it goes in so many different directions, but staying on top of it, staying up to date with the latest updates and patches that come from Microsoft, it’s crazy, man. It is insane.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:58
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business here on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And we’re talking with
Jared Powell. He’s an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now I understand
Jared, that you work in the Chief Information Security Officer Office at the CDC. What can you tell us about your job? It obviously is in securities.

Jared Powell: 26:31
So my job is interesting. I primarily work with end user support, so people who are using their machines day to day, but I do a lot of things. I wear a lot of hats, so I’m constantly having to shift gears. I do a lot of patch management, which means I help maintain security within the office, and make sure everybody’s stuff is up to date, and that there’s no vulnerabilities on these machines. I build a lot of servers. I’ve built … I mean, you name it, I do it, it’s a lot. I feel like I’m constantly just taking a hat off and putting a new one on.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:10
So that’s got to be some pressure. I mean, what kind of personality does it take to succeed in the management information systems field?

Jared Powell: 27:17
I feel like you could have really any personality. But really, if you can just have a good attitude about it, because sometimes it can be difficult and sometimes it can be hard, and you can see that weight on some other people. But I think, if you can be the light in the office, or be the person who’s trying to be a little bit more peppy like me, it really lightens that load a little bit.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:40
And what do you enjoy most about your job?

Jared Powell: 27:42
Honestly, I enjoy the interaction with other people. I’m a big people person, but I enjoy that in tandem with getting to play with new technology every day, that is so fun to me.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:54
What’s your most exciting new tech that you’re working with right now?

Jared Powell: 27:56
Right now we’re primarily working with Splunk and that is a way to look through logs and query through logs to find all kinds of information, it is massive.

Jon Waterhouse: 28:08
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget marketing matters and Lenz knows marketing from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations, think smart, think creative, think Lenz. Learn more at lenzmarketing.com. We’ll be back with more. We’re talking to Jared Powell, an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program, from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. It’s all happening right here on Lenz on Business, on WSB. (singing).

Richard Lenz: 28:55
Hi this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz On Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business. (singing).

Jon Waterhouse: 29:12
You’re listening to Lenz On Business, right here on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’ve been talking with Jared Powell. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree online from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. And today he’s putting it to use in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Now
Jared, looking back on the program, how has it changed your career, and was it worth it?

Jared Powell: 29:59
I can say this, Jon, I don’t think I would have this career without this program. I don’t think I would be at the CDC without it. It gave me the tools to be, I guess … to compete against others in the application process, but it also gave me the tools to really stick with it in the program and learn even more so on the job, and gave me a desire to learn more. In undergrad, I was just kind of making it through and just, “I’m making it.” I’m wanted to make the grade just so I could graduate, but when I went back for my master’s degree, I really had a desire to learn, and that was nurtured not only there but onward into my career.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:36
And did you feel that next level push by studying?

Jared Powell: 30:40
Oh yeah, absolutely. I definitely felt that next level push to learn more, and to acquire more knowledge, because there’s so much out there. And I mean, this program really did give me the tools to succeed in the career that I have today.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:56
And so if someone who is interested in management information systems came to you and said, “Hey, what should I do?” Would you be … would you endorse this program as something to do?

Jared Powell: 31:03
Oh, absolutely. I would definitely do that. I’ve actually had people do that, and I have recommended it highly. People that I went to high school with, who started the program right when I did and they were a little unsure, I was … I told them, “This program is great. It’s maybe difficult at first, and it feels weird. There’s that learning curve of being online, but once you just let yourself get past it, let yourself be uncomfortable, push through, it’s great, and it’s worth the whole process. So just go with it.”

Jon Waterhouse: 31:32
So did they come back to you and thank you, or did they say, “Hey, what were you thinking?”.

Jared Powell: 31:37
I would say they came back and thanked me, and maybe there was a little bit of animosity there, but I think that they were really appreciative because I saw them ended up graduating, I want to say it was last year, and it was just cool to be like, “Hey, you know what? Like, we talked about this, and you actually finished the program.” So it was cool to see maybe a little bit of my … hopefully maybe my advice, but go into play and he graduated, and I think he’s doing great now, so …

Jon Waterhouse: 32:03
Awesome. Well folks, we’ve been talking with Jared Powell, a graduate of the Master of Management Information Systems program at J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. He did it online and so can you. Thank you so much,
Jared, for joining me today. And Lenz On Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future, visit dynamicmoney.com. And the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university, is our presenting sponsor. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online, and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org, and simply complete the form they get started. And make sure and check out our website for our library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com that’s lenzonbusiness.com. This is Jon Waterhouse, and we will see you next week, right here on WSB with more Lenz On Business, (singing).

Richard Lenz: 33:20
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Hannah Zander, graduate of the online MMIS program at Georgia College

We hear it all the time. After snagging an undergraduate degree, many business professionals opt to go after a Masters Degree in the not-so-distant future. But why? What are the reasons behind it, and what kind of concessions will need to be made in the midst of adulting? And what about online learning? Zander, a recent Georgia College online grad, joins guest host Jon Waterhouse and answers these questions and a whole lot more.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leaders, inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: 00:27
We hear it all the time, after snagging a business-related undergrad degree, many young professionals decide to go after a master’s degree in the not too distant future. But why? What are the reasons behind it and what sort of concessions will have to be made in the midst of adulting? Hey, life happens no matter what. And what about online learning? This week’s guest will be answering those questions and a whole lot more. Welcome to Lenz on Business, business talk on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and this week we’ll be talking to a very recent graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program at Georgia College. Please welcome Hannah Zander. Hannah took that virtual graduation walk back in May and before that, she earned her Bachelor of Science and Hotel and Restaurant Management in 2013 at Auburn University. She’s currently Manager of Communications and Logistics at Kennesaw State University. Previously, she served as events and communications coordinator at that school.

Hannah continues putting her Master of Management Information Systems to work at her career and you can learn more about Georgia College’s online graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org. Welcome, Hannah.

Hannah Zander: 01:56
Thank you. Thank you for that introduction.

Jon Waterhouse: 01:59
Absolutely. So, Hannah, you’re fresh off of your online master’s degree program. How does it feel? Is there a weight off your shoulders right now?

Hannah Zander: 02:06
Yes, definitely. First and foremost, it feels great. I definitely feel accomplished. I’m really proud of myself for going and getting my master’s and it feels great to have that degree up on the wall in my office. But you’re right, any program, including an online one, definitely is a time commitment as well as is hard work. The classes were challenging. It took time, it took mental capacity. So it is a slight relief to know that it’s all wrapped up in a bow and totally done.

Jon Waterhouse: 02:35
So when you wrapped it up with that bow, was there a celebration involved?

Hannah Zander: 02:39
Yes, yes, definitely. Had to go out to dinner, celebrate the exciting news that I am now a master’s degree holder.

Jon Waterhouse: 02:48
And you’re also an undergrad holder, obviously. You went to Auburn University. What was that experience like? You majored in hotel and restaurant management. Why hospitality?

Hannah Zander: 03:00
Well, hospitality has always been kind of near and dear to me in the sense that traveling has always been a love of mine as well as it runs in my family. My grandpa, he actually is in the Guinness World Book of Records for going to every single county in the United States.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:17
How many years did that take? We’ve got to stop here and talk about this for a second. How many years did it take to go to every county in the United States of America?

Hannah Zander: 03:25
Oh, many years. I don’t know the exact number because he finished when I was one, so I just came in at the tail end of it. But traveling runs in my blood as well as I love to try new restaurants, as well. When people go out to eat, like you said, for a graduation, they’re often celebrating something. So being a part of that was what drove me to hospitality. I think it’s a really cool experience to be able to help someone plan their wedding, throw a party, just celebrate, and provide good food, a good atmosphere, all of that.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:57
So you got to take a look behind the counter, so to speak, at the hotel and restaurant business. Did you have a favorite course while you were studying that concentration at Auburn? Maybe a favorite professor?

Hannah Zander: 04:09
Yes, absolutely. One thing that was really cool at Auburn was they selected some students, and I was lucky enough to be chosen, to go to the Chinchero Wine Estates in California, that’s in Napa Valley. It was part of the beverage appreciation course.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:27
Wow.

Hannah Zander: 04:27
Which is not just a wine drinking course, although it did involve some wine, and there I earned my Certified Specialist of Wine Certification. So that was just really cool to get an in-depth look in the wine industry in this country, and again, see how it can be incorporated into my career as further knowledge.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:47
Speaking of beverage education, I did not go to Auburn University but I have some friends who did, so I made lots of weekend trips and did a lot of beverage education at Auburn University out of class, and I must say I think I left a few brain cells at Auburn.

Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. And don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and complete the form to get started.

I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and right now we’re chatting with Hannah Zander, a very recent graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program through Georgia College. Now, Hannah, let’s talk about the decision that you made to go back to school and get your degree. You received that undergrad, as I said, back in 2013, what was on your mind? What led you to go online and study and get your Master’s through Georgia College?

Hannah Zander: 05:57
Well, I actually lived in Birmingham before I lived in the Atlanta area, and in Birmingham, I worked in the hospitality industry, so I did get that hands-on experience for my undergrad. But then in 2016, my husband and I moved to the Atlanta area again, and that’s when I decided I wanted to transition my career a little bit. I wanted to kind of take the detail-oriented project management analytical skills that I had gained in my time in the industry as an event planner and kind of refocus it into the technology space, which is something I also had an interest for, as well as both of my parents have computer science degrees, so it kind of felt like a natural fit if I’m wanting to kind of transition careers of what to look at.

Luckily, I did get a position at Kennesaw State University, and one of the great benefits of working for the university system of Georgia is that they do offer free tuition for programs within the university system.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:57
Oh, that’s awesome.

Hannah Zander: 06:57
Yes, it’s definitely a great benefit of working for an employer like that. So having that benefit, I knew I wanted to take advantage and get into a great program, and that’s when I started doing my research and found Georgia College’s program.

Jon Waterhouse: 07:12
So do you think younger professionals need that edge of a master’s degree in today’s workplace? Is that one of the reasons that you went back to school?

Hannah Zander: 07:21
It definitely is one of the reasons for me. I think education is extremely important, so being able to have the chance to continue it was definitely a great benefit for me. I do think it will give me an edge to my career. I have already used some of the skills that I learned in the program, in my current role. So I do feel like having the master’s degree has definitely put me on a better career trajectory than had I not. But of course, everyone has to make that decision for themselves.

Jon Waterhouse: 07:47
Folks, if you’re just tuning in to this week’s Lenz on Business on WSB, we’re chatting with Hannah Zander. She’s a very recent graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program at Georgia College. So Hannah, why Master’s of Management Information Systems? What led you to go in that direction?

Hannah Zander: 08:08
Well, Master’s in Management Information Systems, even though it’s a mouthful, it’s definitely a great degree.

Jon Waterhouse: 08:15
It is.

Hannah Zander: 08:15
It’s a great industry as a whole. I think it’s so interesting because there are so many different career paths you can take after receiving this degree. You can go into technical writing, you can go onto project management, database management, managing computer networks or enterprise systems, so there’s so many different varieties of paths you can take. So that’s one thing that attracted me to it, especially because I did get a rather specific bachelor’s degree. I wanted a broader master’s program as well as it allowed me to take the business knowledge that I already had and apply it to some new technical skills and still incorporate those two pieces of how my brain works.

Jon Waterhouse: 09:00
And lots of great schools have online programs. I mean, in fact, it can be kind of overwhelming when you look online and you’re like, “Oh my gosh, I want to go back to school, but where in the heck do I go?” Because it’s like a big buffet and there are all these different dishes with different flavorings and such. Which one do you choose? Which one do you indulge in? And why Georgia College? Why did you make that choice?

Hannah Zander: 09:24
Well, I agree. I definitely did a lot of research, but Georgia College definitely stood out. First off, I knew that I wanted a completely online program. The flexibility of an online program is what I knew would work with my personal and work life. So I definitely knew that that’s what I wanted. I also was really drawn to Georgia College’s smaller class sizes. It’s a little bit of a smaller school, so I felt like the small class sizes would give me more personalized attention. And I was correct, that is the case. So that was definitely a draw as well as within the curriculum for this program you have the chance to choose four electives. So I thought that was really neat because I could focus on the topics that I found most interesting. So that gave me a little more flexibility to tailor my learning to what I wanted to learn and get out of this program.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:15
So what were your four electives?

Hannah Zander: 10:18
Let me see if I remember them off the top of my head. The first one I took was a coding class. I believe it was called program development. So I learned some PHP and HTML in there. And then I took one on microcomputer applications, so that focused on Access and Excel. And then I took one on business intelligence, which I find extremely interesting. That was focusing on learning how to analyze data, collect data using systems like SAP and Tableau for visualization. That was a great one to expose me to a lot of different systems that I hadn’t previously seen in my workplace.

And then the final one that I took was a computer security class. And that one was really cool because that was, again, something that I hadn’t been exposed to previously through my work or my other schooling. That one was a really neat class because it actually allowed us to do a security audit on a place that was specific to us. So I was able to go and I actually chose my home parish and was able to go in and analyze their cybersecurity and offer recommendations. And that was a project within the course was to be able to do that.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:35
So cool. Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business right here on WSB. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College is J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. Don’t go anywhere. This week we’re talking with Hannah Zander, a very recent graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program at Georgia College. She’s taking us behind the curtain. We’ll be back in just a few moments right here on WSB.

Richard Lenz: 12:20
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 12:49
You are locked into Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. This week we’re learning all about the decisions and realities behind getting an online master’s degree in a business concentration. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and we’re chatting with Hannah Zander. Hannah recently earned her online Master of Management Information Systems degree from Georgia College. She continues putting her Master of Management Information Systems degree to use in her career. You can learn more about Georgia College’s online graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now Hannah, let’s talk about the process of online learning. I have never taken an online course outside of some things at work, some training things, but had you ever taken an online course prior to Georgia College?

Hannah Zander: 13:48
Actually, no. Georgia College was my first exposure to online learning and it’s just a completely different experience than when you’re in an undergrad atmosphere. When I was an undergrad, I was a full-time student, so I was completely focused on school and extracurricular activities.

But now, I was a part-time student because I have a full-time job, I’m married, so I have those obligations, as well. So I needed it to be a different experience and that’s why I’m glad Georgia College’s program was all online because being in an online program, it just gave me so much more flexibility to work around my own schedule. One thing that did happen in my second semester in their program was I actually got a promotion at my job, which was great, but also meant more responsibility as well as more staying after hours for various events. So being in an online program allowed me to schedule my school work around my full-time work.

Jon Waterhouse: 14:53
Got you. So did you have any concerns though, walking in the door, walking in the virtual door? Did you have any idea of like, “Oh my gosh, I’m really kind of worried about this. What is this going to be like? I’ve never done this before.” Any anxiety?

Hannah Zander: 15:08
A little bit, yes. I was concerned that I wouldn’t get the same sort of professor or peer-to-peer interaction that you would have in a face-to-face course. But I think Georgia College actually does a really good job of mitigating that issue. First off, the professors are really responsive, so if you have any questions, they email you quickly or they’ll be willing to set up virtual office hours with you, as well as for a lot of the classes they use a system called Webex, which is essentially kind of like Skype where you can see another person’s visual, you can see their audios, as well as they can share their screen and you can share their screen. So we were still able to do class presentations, get some public speaking experience in there, as well as learn from our peers in that way as well.

Jon Waterhouse: 16:00
That’s so wild. I mean holograms are next, right? That’s what’s going to happen. Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. And like Hannah, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org. And all you’ve got to do is complete the form to get started.

I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and yes, we are talking with Hannah Zander this week on Lenz on Business, a very recent graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program at Georgia College. We’ve got more with Hannah in just a few moments. We’ll be back on Lenz on Business here on WSB after news, weather, and traffic.

Richard Lenz: 16:54
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 17:21
Welcome back to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse here on WSB. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. You can learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

If you just tuned into this week’s episode of Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College, this week we’re learning all about the decisions and realities behind getting an online master’s degree in a business concentration. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, as I said, and we’re talking with Hannah Zander. Hannah recently earned her online Master of Management Information Systems degree from Georgia College. Before that she earned her Bachelor of Science in Hotel and Restaurant Management in 2013 at Auburn University. She’s currently Manager of Communications and Logistics at Kennesaw State University, and previously she served as Events and Communications Coordinator at that school. Did you throw some parties?

Hannah Zander: 18:36
A little bit, yeah.

Jon Waterhouse: 18:38
Bet it was fun.

Hannah Zander: 18:39
For the students.

Jon Waterhouse: 18:40
Yeah. Wow. Student parties, got to have an element of good time in there. Hannah continues putting her Master of Management Information Systems degree to use in her career. And you can learn more about Georgia College’s online graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

So Hannah, tell me about the whole process of this program, of this specific concentration that you were involved with. What was the day-to-day process like as far as the study of Master of Management Information Systems online through Georgia College?

Hannah Zander: 19:18
Of course. Well, and of course, with any degree program, time management is going to be a key skill.

Jon Waterhouse: 19:25
I’m terrible at that, by the way. It’s a work in progress. “Progress not perfection,” they say.

Hannah Zander: 19:31
Right, right. Exactly. So time management is key. So I do work full-time, so normally 8:00 to 5:00, Monday through Friday. Luckily, if you heard previously when they would do the Webex sessions, which are kind of online virtual sessions with the professor and peers, those would typically be one day a week from about 5:30 to 8:30. So it definitely gave you quality time with your professors learning the subject material without being too much of a burden on the rest of your life, the rest of your work schedule. And then there were, of course, assignments that you were responsible for doing on your own. For me, what I like to do, I would at least like to review the assignments before the weekend, so if I had questions that would give me time to reach out to the professors. But then, I’d normally set aside time on my weekends to complete those assignments.

Jon Waterhouse: 20:27
Let’s talk about these classes and what were they all about? You mentioned some earlier, some of the elective classes that you took.

Hannah Zander: 20:34
Yes, absolutely. The classes that this program offers, they really offer a solid foundation and a variety of skills, which I really enjoyed because it allowed me to see a multitude of ways that information systems can be applied to the business environment. Some of the courses that I particularly enjoyed, one was database management. In that, we reviewed using SQL Server, Microsoft Access, database design, all things that are particularly useful because data is such a valuable resource in today’s business environment. Learning how to really properly collect, store, manage that data, that was a crucial skill we learned in that class. Similarly, the topics in business intelligence class, I mentioned previously, that one kind of built on that class by adding in the analytics piece, and through that class I learned, and which I actually continue to use this skill in my current role, in how to use Tableau, which if you’re not familiar with Tableau, it’s kind of a data management visualization tool. And what I focused on, both in my class and current role, is the visualization piece.

And one thing that’s actually really interesting is one of my professors from Georgia College and I actually belonged to the same Tableau associated professional group. It’s called the Atlanta Tableau User Group. It’s essentially where professionals across the Atlanta area can come together and review best practices for using Tableau, learn new skills, see what they’re offering as new products, all of that. And he will actually be presenting at the June meeting, so I’m excited to continue to learn from him even after graduation.

Jon Waterhouse: 22:20
That’s super cool. Could you explain in layman’s terms, to this laymen across the table from you, what is Tableau exactly? You kind of gave us the nugget definition. Can you expand?

Hannah Zander: 22:31
Yes, absolutely. So what I use it for personally, it has a multitude of uses because it’s a great product, but what I use it for is I take data, so usually in Excel format, upload it, and then that allows me to create online interactive visualizations. So where you can hover, you can click on a bubble and it’ll transform into more data, and all of that.

Jon Waterhouse: 22:53
Oh, wow.

Hannah Zander: 22:55
Just a way to really bring your data to life.

Jon Waterhouse: 22:57
So a lot of graphic elements in this program?

Hannah Zander: 22:59
Yes, absolutely.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:00
Okay. And so let’s talk about your professor. What did he teach you about Tableau that you use the most in your current job?

Hannah Zander: 23:08
His main thing was focusing on proper design. Because without having a proper design to the data you’re trying to represent, it’s just going to be a jumbled picture. It’s not going to convey the message you’re trying to convey. So his real focus was on using the visualization software to tell a story with your data.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:30
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business and our guest this week is telling her story. The whole shebang is presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. And don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and just fill out that form and get started.

I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and we are chatting with Hannah Zander. She did just that. She’s a recent graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program at Georgia College.

Hannah, earlier you were talking about that specialty being such a mouthful, and I have to say it every week on Lenz on Business, every week that I’m behind this microphone, and it is indeed a skill that I have to kind of like learn and hone every week here, just saying Master of Management Information Systems. When you were digging into this specialty, what were some of the things that you learned that were the most surprising?

Hannah Zander: 24:32
I think that some of the things that were most surprising to me was, I guess, how much technical knowledge the professors were able to impart without me having a technical computer background.

Jon Waterhouse: 24:48
Really? You didn’t have much of one?

Hannah Zander: 24:48
No. Like we discussed earlier, my bachelor’s is in hotel and restaurant management, which you’re not doing a lot of coding when you’re serving food.

Jon Waterhouse: 24:55
Your hands are full.

Hannah Zander: 24:58
Right, exactly. No time for that. So I was very pleasantly surprised in how the professors, as well as the coursework structure as a whole, was able to take someone like me with a very, very limited entry-level knowledge and transform me into someone who I feel like now has marketable technological skills that I can use. So that was a really cool thing. One of the classes that I took specifically was on learning how to code PHP, learning cybersecurity skills, and then the program also offered through two of the courses I took actual certifications in cybersecurity and computer networking. Things I had never really been exposed to previously, that now I feel like I have a solid foundation because of this program.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:46
And cybersecurity, of course, all over the news. We’re not going to get political, but in your course of study, did your learning and studying of cybersecurity kind of enlighten you as to some of the things that are going on in the world? Did it kind of give you a different perspective?

Hannah Zander: 26:05
Oh, absolutely. It’s like you said, it’s so crucial nowadays to protect data, and especially with all the new innovations that are coming out, which are awesome, such as everything with smartphones and smart devices, and people are having smart homes, but how do we keep them secure? How do we make sure no one’s listening to you over the line while you’re talking, trying to get the radio on in your house? Those kinds of things. So it did open my eyes to that and teach me the foundational knowledge to be able to work in a place like that if I so choose.

Jon Waterhouse: 26:37
If you’re just tuning in the Lenz on Business here on WSB, we’re talking with Hannah Zander. She’s a very graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program at Georgia College. She actually completed that program in May, fresh out of the gate, brand spanking new degree.

Now Hannah, let’s talk about your time management during that whole experience, which you did talk about earlier on in the program, but let’s kind of go a little bit deeper, if you don’t mind. You were working full-time, as you said, while you were studying, so how did you manage and juggle that schedule? You alluded a little bit to that, but kind of give us some of your tips and tricks.

Hannah Zander: 27:18
Well for me personally, I’ve always been an agenda person, so I would always have every week what I needed to accomplish, both for work and school, in my agenda, and just making sure those things were prioritized when I needed them to.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:35
Okay. Stop right there. I am not a great agenda person. All I really use is a Word Doc and maybe a calendar, a digital calendar. What sort of tools do you use? What should I be using?

Hannah Zander: 27:47
Well, besides writing things down, I guess the online system that Georgia College uses, the Brightspace Desire2Learn, which is where all the course content is, that system also sends you reminders as well. So that was also really helpful. You’re logging in on Sunday and are like, “Oh, I just got a reminder for a quiz I need to take. I better go do that.” So, definitely a helpful tool.

Jon Waterhouse: 28:13
My goodness, that’s really cool, man. Making it happen at Georgia College. Folks, you are listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse and we are talking to Hannah Zander. She’s a very recent graduate of the online Master of Management Information Systems Program at Georgia College. We’re going to be learning more from Hannah during our final segment of the hour, so you don’t want to go anywhere. And don’t forget that marketing matters and Lenz knows marketing, from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations. Think smart. Think creative. Think Lenz. Learn more at lenzmarketing.com.

This is Jon Waterhouse with Lenz on Business on WSB. We’ll be back in just a few moments.

Richard Lenz: 29:14
Hi. This is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 29:41
You are listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB. It’s presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. And this week we’ve been having a blast learning more about Georgia College’s online business programs. We’ve been talking with Hannah Zander. She recently earned her online Master of Management Information Systems degree from Georgia College. She continues putting her master degree to work in her career. You can learn more about Georgia College’s graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now Hannah, one thing that I always say when I talk to some of the students from Georgia College, and we’ve had a few on the program, is no matter what, no matter how you prepare yourself, life happens. Right?

Hannah Zander: 30:33
Absolutely.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:33
And something really big happened to you in the midst of your studies and amidst of your online studies at Georgia College. What happened to you Hannah?

Hannah Zander: 30:44
Well, a few months ago, my husband and I were excited to find out that I became pregnant. So we are very excited about that. But it did fall, like you said, in the midst of my final semester at GCSU. So it was like, “Okay before we start this next adventure of having a baby, I need to finish my current adventure of finishing my master’s.” And that’s, again, where the flexibility of the online program really worked in my favor, especially because I had doctors’ appointments, fatigue, all of the things that come with being pregnant. So I was excited that I was able to complete my studies before we have our child.

Jon Waterhouse: 31:25
And we were talking with our board op here, Shane. Shane, wave to us, please. He’s waving. I’m telling you, you can believe me. Shane was talking about that, about the fact of rolling with the punches like that. And so many people, when a life event happens, may put it on hold, they may step away. You could have easily done that and no one would have criticized you, but you went for it and you stuck with it. And that’s very admirable.

Hannah Zander: 31:51
Thank you.

Jon Waterhouse: 31:51
And speaking of your degree and what you learned and what you’ve used, how are you applying what you learned at your current job at KSU?

Hannah Zander: 32:02
Well, my current role is not an IT role, so it’s not a traditional information systems follow-up career, but I found so many ways to incorporate what I’ve learned into that role. I currently work with events and marketing, but I have found ways to take things, especially like the data management class, the business intelligence class, to incorporate those things to make better decisions for events and marketing. So I’ve used the skills such as Access and Tableau, like we talked about before, to take our event data, analyze it, and make sure we’re reaching the student populations we want to reach, make sure our marketing is effective. And so I think that’s just a really awesome application of how information systems can span all industries.

Jon Waterhouse: 32:50
That’s super cool. Making it work. Do you use any of these tools at home now, as well?

Hannah Zander: 32:55
I do. I use the Tableau. I know I’ve said it 800 times now.

Jon Waterhouse: 33:01
I’m not going to forget it.

Hannah Zander: 33:03
Right. But I do use that one at home, as well. They do put out some Makeover Monday practice visualization, so it’s something I can do at home to continue honing my skills just because it interests me and I like the creative aspect of creating visualizations and all of that. So I do use that one essentially for practice at home.

Jon Waterhouse: 33:27
Well, Hannah, thank you so much for joining us today. I really appreciate it. It’s been very interesting. She’s a Georgia College online grad. And best of luck with your future and best of luck with that baby on the way.

Hannah Zander: 33:39
Thank you.

Jon Waterhouse: 33:40
Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com. And check out our website for our past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s lenzonbusiness.com. And the whole shebang is brought to you by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online, just like Hannah. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete that form to get started.

I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. Come see us next week, right here on WSB for more Lenz on Business.

Richard Lenz: 34:34
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Dr. Wendy Lenz, a Graduate of Georgia College’s Web MBA

They say a way to test a romantic relationship is by successfully surviving an IKEA shopping trip. What about interviewing your spouse on a radio show? This week Richard takes a stab at the latter. Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s online MBA program, spent more than 10 years as chief operating officer for the largest cancer practice in the Southeast. Richard and Dr. Lenz examine topics including her interest and experience in both medicine and business, merging the two, and how she ran a company while getting her MBA.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz on 95.5 WSB Atlanta’s News & Talk. Presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Exploring Atlanta’s business leaders and inspiring stories, lessons learned and tips for growth and success.

Richard Lenz: 00:24
Welcome to Lenz on Business. Business talk on WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m host, Richard Lenz. Today, we have a very interesting and special show. I can’t tell you the amount of trouble I’ve gone to, to get this guest in the studio.

Richard Lenz: 00:44
Today, we are with Dr. Wendy Lenz. Dr. Lenz is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

Richard Lenz : 00:53
She also received her her MBA at Georgia College. Dr. Lenz has an extensive resume in the business world and she’s co-founded several businesses and nonprofit entities along with working as Chief Operating Officer for more than 10 years for the largest cancer practice in the Southeast. She also happens to be married to me and so our listeners will be very sympathetic as this unwinds I guess. Honey, thanks for coming in.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 01:26
Hi, honey. It only took a piece of jewelry and you making me dinner one night and here I am.

Richard Lenz: 01:32
Well, maybe the price wasn’t too bad, I guess. Well, I thought you would actually be a great guest not just because we are married, but all the conversations we have about business, I think you’re one of the brightest people I’ve ever met and talented. And of course, I’m biased, we got married.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 01:50
No, keep going.

Richard Lenz: 01:51
Whenever I have a business issue, I come to you and you’re always so wise and part of it is hard-earned, because you’ve grown so many different businesses, you’ve been on so many different boards, you’ve run nonprofits. It’s a string of success that’s pretty amazing. It’s not like you were born with a silver spoon in your mouth either.

Richard Lenz: 02:17
So I just have so much respect and admiration for you, and I’m laying it on thick here, but not really, it’s actually how I really feel. And also, in this mix was you decided to get an MBA from Georgia College, which obviously is the sponsor of this show. And I thought you could speak to that as well, and you got that online while you were actually running one of the largest cancer practices in the country.

Richard Lenz: 02:42
So if someone’s able to do that, I think that’s an interesting story for people out there who are maybe thinking about getting that MBA. And of course, Georgia College is a great opportunity to do that, but you can do it online. So, a lot to talk about here. And maybe where I’d like to start is tell me about your upbringing, where are you from and how did you end up in medicine?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 03:03
Well, I can’t let that introduction go by without saying thank you. There’s nothing that is more rewarding or touching than having the person that you love say those kinds of things. So thank you, honey for that.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 03:19
I think that mutual respect in a relationship is really important. And that’s one of my principles from the aspect of business is just respect everyone. Respect your employees, respect your customers. It’s a relationship. So that being said, Thank you.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 03:36
To answer the question that you asked, my business beginnings really started at very early age because I grew up in a farm in Delaware. And although my father was not formally educated in business, nor was my mother, they worked as a team to create this corporate enterprise, if you will, family enterprise that a true mom and pop farm and that’s where I was raised.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 04:02
My four sisters and I were the labor force. And I saw my dad have to work long hours in order to provide income for the family. He worried about the different elements that would come in, the disruptive forces. In the case of farming, it’s pricing, it’s pests, it’s weather. So sometimes different than what we see in other kinds of corporate entities, but he had to deal with all of that. And I remember him working long days and then at night, sitting down with a tablet and a pencil and working the numbers.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 04:40
So that’s really my first foray into business. I don’t think I really understood that until I went on to being in business, but then found so many similarities between my dad a simple hard-working farmer, and what I do and my work as a physician and then moving into a more administrative business role.

Richard Lenz: 05:10
It’s interesting that the role of farming, of course in our economy used to be we were very agriculturally based, and many of us grew up on farms. My folks going back to my grandparents were farmers in Iowa. And today, I think it’s less than 1% of Americans are involved in farming. So think about the productivity of those farmers in this country, it’s amazing. We’re feeding the world with 1%.

Richard Lenz: 05:39
But the other thing I’ve experienced is as I’m out and about and I’m meeting some great business people, so many of them grew up on a farm, and they actually learned so many different lessons of business. And of course, one of them is hard work. Your father, of course, was very hard worker. He actually worked two jobs.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 05:59
That’s right.

Richard Lenz: 06:00
I don’t know how someone can like do a farm, and then also work the midnight shift somewhere. It was really something else.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 06:07
Well, that’s an excellent segue into the other part of your question, which was how did I run a practice and then get an MBA. I had a great role model in my dad, and of course, my mom was right there with him. Although she didn’t work, she took care of all of us and handled the livestock and the garden and all of those other elements that are required to grow up and get your sustenance from the ground.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 06:31
From the standpoint of moving into an MBA and working a full-time job, and my job was very full time at the peak of where we were at the practice where I worked. We had over 500 employees, 60 physicians, multiple other levels of healthcare providers, and we had offices in three states. So it was busy and I was head of operations. As you have often said to me, my superpower is getting things done. So that was my job was to get things done in multiple locations.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 07:09
But in addition to that, I really felt that coming from a background of medicine, I understood medicine, I understood patient care. And from that, I really understood customer service, because I believe that the two are tied together. Your patients are your customers. And if you don’t understand what they’re going through and their whole experience and adapt to that, then you’re not really helping them as much as you can.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 07:39
I also felt that from the financial aspect and just nuts and bolts, human resources, healthcare insurance for own employees, logistics, supply chain management, all of those things are not things that one learns in medical school, and I felt I could help the business more if I had a foundational understanding of what business was truly about.

Richard Lenz: 08:04
It’s interesting in the world of healthcare and physician practices, you need to be more than just a good physician at diagnosing and applying the right treatment, etc, etc. There’s actually a business backbone to it that is very onerous and hard. Regulations, getting paid in all the different ways. How do you bill? How do you collect? How do you attract patients?

Richard Lenz: 08:35
There’s so much to it that doctors I know out there, they’re like pulling their hair out to have a full day of treating patients but then have to go and handle all these aspects. I don’t know how they find time to sleep. It’s so stressful just to be trying to care for people and their outcomes, their health outcomes, but then there’s this whole business side.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 08:57
And I just interrupted you, which I always do.

Richard Lenz: 09:01
Now honey, Come on.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 09:02
One of the fallacies or myths that I think physicians have is I just want to be a physician. I don’t want to deal with any of the business aspects of it. Let somebody else deal with that. But what you’ve just related is so true. You can’t get away from the business components of the business of medicine.

Richard Lenz: 09:19
Right. I think any business that’s out there, whatever its mission is, it will deliver on that mission way better if it’s a healthy business. So how do you have a healthy business and that leads to Lenz, and we market people to give them a better chance at having an even healthier business so they can do more of the things that they need to do to get to their goals.

Richard Lenz: 09:39
You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

Richard Lenz: 09:59
I’m host, Richard Lenz. This week, we’re talking with Dr. Wendy lands, a graduate of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Online Masters Program.

Richard Lenz: 10:09
So you were running this practice. You had pursued becoming a doctor and eventually running operations of this huge oncology practice and they decided to go after getting an MBA, because you just felt like maybe there’s some gaps in your knowledge maybe or you just kind of polish it off.

Richard Lenz: 10:30
You’ve had all this great business experience, but maybe getting an MBA would help you even more. And so you probably searched around, like where to go for that. So tell me a little bit about the process and why you selected Georgia College.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 10:40
You do have different speaks, so to speak. There’s med-speak and there’s business-speak. And as the company grew, what I realized is that I was sitting at the table with the business-speak people, and I needed to be able to convert the med-speak into business-speak. And I had a lot of experience in that, but I wanted to really solidify the foundation and that’s why I want to search for something that would help me to do that. And an MBA seemed to be the best vehicle for that.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 11:22
Obviously, I was not going to be able to take off work to go to a brick and mortar school. I needed to find something online that I could do in my time, so I searched. I wanted an accredited program. I wanted a program that I did not have to take GMATs for, had already had enough of testing through medical school. And I wanted to have a program that would be able to provide me the access to the foundational courses that I needed and Georgia College did all that for me.

Richard Lenz: 11:53
You’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m host Richard Lenz. Brought to you by Georgia college’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Stay tuned.

Richard Lenz: 12:02
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 12:31
We’re back with Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney College of Business. I’m host, Richard Lenz. This week we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Online Masters Program.

Richard Lenz: 12:46
Now Wendy, you happen to be my wife and maybe some people are hearing that in this show today. And I wouldn’t have invited you in if you didn’t have business lessons to give and also a great experience with Georgia College, the web MBA program.

Richard Lenz: 13:02
I wonder if you can address that some more. So you were out there looking for which program to do, and you wanted one that was convenient, and wasn’t super expensive, I guess. I mean compared to some that are out there, and where you didn’t have to quit your job. Tell us what your decision process was when you decided to go with Georgia College’s program.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 13:24
The most important decision was that I wanted an accredited college. I’ve got a certain resume of going to Georgetown University, University of North Carolina, and I wanted to be able to complete that set, if you will, of great educational institutions by choosing a program that had an MBA that was fully accredited and had excellent standing.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 13:52
And as I was doing my research of online programs, which I felt was important. At that time, we had kids that were still at home, and obviously marriage and then the business. There were a lot of balls in the air. So I definitely wanted an online program. As I began searching, Georgia College kept coming up of where they ranked and that they truly were accredited. Many of these programs that are online are not.

Richard Lenz: 14:19
Right. They’re number two best online college ranking, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 14:24
Right.

Richard Lenz: 14:24
It is very attractive.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 14:26
Right. Frankly, the affordability didn’t matter as much to me, but I was, of course, very pleasantly surprised that it was very affordable and it wasn’t a huge commitment, an outlay of cash in order to be able to get this degree. So those were the first criteria that I used in looking at choosing Georgia College.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 14:52
Then I looked at some of the other criteria and how it would affect me. So I had mentioned the GMATs, and taking the graduate aptitude test, which I did not particularly want to do. I knew I would have to study for that, which were more hours and then take this test. Georgia College exempts mid level management and senior executives from taking the GMAT.

Richard Lenz: 15:18
So you can get a waiver, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 15:19
You can get a waiver through an application process.

Richard Lenz: 15:22
Right. Well, if you have this experience, now you have to go take the GMAT and wait for that to happen and then you pay that money and then see your scores? But if you have this great experience, they’ll give you a waiver.

Richard Lenz: 15:32
Well, you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget, you can get your MBA Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

Richard Lenz: 15:54
I’m host Richard Lenz and we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz who’s a graduate of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Online Masters Program. Stay tuned and we’ll come back for more about the program and get some business wisdom from Dr. Wendy Lenz.

Richard Lenz: 16:15
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 16:42
Welcome back to Lenz on Business. I’m host, Richard Lenz. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Masters of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 17:04
This week, we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s, J. Whitney Bunting College of Business Online Masters Program. What a coincidence.

Richard Lenz: 17:14
Dr. Lenz is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She also received her MBA at Georgia College. Dr. Lenz has an extensive resume in the business world co-founding several businesses and nonprofit entities along with working as Chief Operating Officer for over 10 years for the largest cancer practice in the Southeast.

Richard Lenz: 17:39
She also happens to be married to me and I didn’t think that would disqualify her. I’ve been twisting her arm for years to get her to come in and talk about, if nothing else, her business experience and then with this coincidence of the title sponsor, and then also she got her degree from there. That kind of made sense too. So I thought this would be a good at least twofer. So Wendy, you …

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 18:08
The twisting of the arm was virtual.

Richard Lenz: 18:10
Yeah, it was not …

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 18:11
Just want to make that clear.

Richard Lenz: 18:12
Spousal abuse doesn’t have to be physical, right? I just think you have an incredible American story. You’re one of five daughters worked on a farm and then found your way from the small town, going to the University of Delaware, then getting accepted into Georgetown which is not easy. And then eventually, University of North Carolina to become a doctor. That was your dream to become a doctor.

Richard Lenz: 18:46
Tell me why that was your dream and then tell me at what moment and why did you decide actually business might be more attractive because you got into the business side of things and in healthcare.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 19:01
Well growing up in a farm, my role models at that time and this was … Now, I’m going to date myself, which is okay because that’s part of where wisdom comes from, right? Many experiences over a period of time. But I was growing up on a farm in the 60s, and there were not a lot of job opportunities, if you will, for women that were not what were considered traditional at the time.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 19:27
So women were going to college, my parents very much believed in education. Neither one of them were educated beyond high school. And they always felt that in some way, as part of the American dream that education was the keystone that prevented them from moving forward and having better jobs and being able to earn a better living.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 19:49
So they were adamant that their five daughters were going to receive a college education and they worked very hard to make that dream come true for all of us. My sisters are all in education, which is interesting given that emphasis on it.

Richard Lenz: 20:08
Well, it’s a calling, right? Education.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 20:08
It really is.

Richard Lenz: 20:09
So is medicine.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 20:11
I was kind of marked at an early age from medicine aspect. My sister, one of them, became very, very ill and was actually having seizures. We’re living out on a farm. We’re miles from town. And my mother put a call into our doctor and it was a very traditional family doctor who you call and his wife answers at their home, because his office is in the front porch of his home, and she gets the doctor.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 20:43
And it was late at night and he gets into his car and drives out the miles in the middle of the night. There are no streetlights out in the country and comes in. My mother, who normally was pretty collected and my dad who was always collected we’re very frantic with my sister being unresponsive.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 21:05
He came in, I’m not sure what he did. I’m not sure what tools he even had to be able to do that at that point. But what happened as the result of that visit is that my parents were calm. My sister ultimately got better. He came out and visited. And in my mind, that person created an environment that was healing. And that’s what I wanted to do.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 21:31
I wanted to be able to help people to heal in their stress, in their pain, in their distress. And from that moment, I said that I wanted to be a doctor and I was laughed at. I was kind of ridiculed about it, because that’s not what little girls did in the 60s. They didn’t want to be a doctor. And I had people that helped me to achieve that goal along the way.

Richard Lenz: 22:00
Well, pursuing an MD then, of course, is a very stressful path of study and education. And it takes many, many years, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 22:11
It does take a lot of years, although pain has no memory. And as I recall it, yes, it was stressful and it was difficult, but it was something that I really wanted to do. I love doing it. I loved learning about medicine. The body is such an amazing organism. It’s a miracle. And to be able to learn about that miracle and understand how it worked was fascinating and very rewarding for me.

Richard Lenz: 22:40
You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget, you can get your MBA Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

Richard Lenz: 23:02
I’m host Richard Lenz, and we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz who’s a graduate of the program we were just discussing. We’re talking about her background. So you decide to become a physician and you become one, but at some point you started also developing an interest in business. Is there a moment where you had an epiphany that, “Hey, I might pursue the business side of things.” How did your goals changed, your mission change? Had your story changed?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 23:32
I can’t say that I had an epiphany so much as I had cumulative experiences. And as you know, honey, I’m very directive and I like being in charge, and I like being in control.

Richard Lenz: 23:45
True story.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 23:47
What I found is that I was increasingly frustrating taking care of patients. At this point, I was able to see maybe 10 people a day in my private practice and I saw so many opportunities that could be changed, where the things that I saw, how we worked, how patients came in the office, that could be improved. So that the patient experience could be improved. But that I couldn’t do that, because I was seeing 15 patients a day.

Richard Lenz: 24:21
Right. I sort of call that the multiplier effect. So you start putting yourself in a position to actually do more than that actual hands-on piece, which is sometimes the most satisfying.

Richard Lenz: 24:31
I look at my own career. I have a journalism degree, and then I was writing the stories and doing other things in journalism. And then I realized, well, actually the people that own those communication channels were making a lot of decisions.

Richard Lenz: 24:45
And actually, if I could be in a better position over communication channels, then I could be doing more than just writing that one story. Not that, that isn’t also super important, but there would be a multiplier effect of sort of positive communication to help communities, people, organizations, etc. So I also pivoted into business to have like a bigger impact. And it sounds like that’s what was sort of appealing to you.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 25:10
It absolutely was. And it did evolve over time through various jobs. I had an interest in hospice and palliative care and a segment of our population that we tend not to want to talk about and ignore those people that are suffering from incurable diseases and dying.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 25:31
And whether it was my farm background where life and death were very much linked and normal to a certain degree, or whether it was really the very compassionate training that I had at Georgetown that valued every life.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 25:50
I felt a calling to go into hospice, and that was one of the first businesses that I help to co-found. There, we had to do everything, so I became quality control. I had to write the rules. I had to help staff from a nursing standpoint.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 26:11
If the supply manager couldn’t bring out a wheelchair or a bed, I had one in my car and I was seeing patients at home. Ultimately, through that experience, I was tapped if you will to develop a lot of those programs in hospice and palliative care with this large cancer practice and to bring those there.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 26:35
And then that naturally evolved here. We had many offices and we had differences in the way that our patients were being taken care of in one office to the other. The way to standardize that was through applying basic business principles of customer service, of logistics, of supply chain management, all of that with this overlay of the art of medicine.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 27:01
So it grew from there, and I just started to have that same passion and love for what business could do as a tool to be able to help our patients get better care, standardized care, whether they were in South Georgia, or they were in the hills of North Carolina.

Richard Lenz: 27:20
Well, Frank Lloyd Wright, the architect wrote that there’s actually no better education and experience. And I think that’s kind of true. But also, isn’t it great to go to school and kind of fill in the gaps in that experience and there’s a value? And so you decided to pursue that web MBA at Georgia College?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 27:41
I absolutely did. And I probably didn’t even really understand how helpful it was until we were sitting down across the table negotiating the sale of this practice, and the “business people” that were non-medical started talking about valuation techniques. And I understood what they were talking about. I understood the language. I understood the methodology that they were using because of my MBA.

Richard Lenz: 28:10
Yeah. That’s why the bean counters they have their bean counter language, right? And if you know the bean counter language, then they kind of go, “Maybe her opinions have some value.”

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 28:22
But what it does is it truly gave me a seat at the table.

Richard Lenz: 28:27
You’ve been listening to Lenz on Business with guest, Dr. Wendy Lenz. Stay tuned for more. Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 29:06
You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m host, Richard Lenz. Today’s show, we’ve been talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s. J. Whitney Bunting College of Business Online Masters Program, also happens to be my lovely wife. And I had to twist her arm to come in here. Well actually, it’s more emotional twist your arm, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 29:34
Right.

Richard Lenz: 29:35
Okay. Anyway, I think maybe it would be good to give our listeners a taste of what was it actually like being in the program. How long was the program? Was it one weekend?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 29:48
No.

Richard Lenz: 29:48
And a lot of trust falls or was it … What it involved. A kind of interesting part of it is the group dynamic. You work on the group projects and that kind of thing and kind of make some friends.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:02
Yes. That was one of the things that I was surprised about, because you can’t always see deep into a program when you’re looking at it online. But I like the fact that I got to actually meet the people. There was an element of bricks and mortar.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:19
When you’re sitting around in a classroom, you’re seeing everyone there and you get to know what’s going on with their lives. It’s team building, just like you do on business.

Richard Lenz: 30:27
Right. The program kicks off with first a meeting, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:29
Right. There’s an orientation and it’s on site. Generally, it’s been held in Atlanta. All of the professors come, so you meet the professors that you’re going to see in the 18 month program, which is how long in general it is. You also meet the administrators who help grease the wheels when you have any difficulty or problems in meeting schedules, timelines, whatever.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:53
And then your cohort is selected and they do this through an interesting way of trying to match your personalities so that you don’t have all maybe type A’s. Not saying that I am. I am. But obviously, if there were six Wendy’s in a group, we would probably come to fisticuffs on our group session. So they do an excellent job of matching the type of person. And it’s very helpful for people to understand that.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 31:25
So I got to meet my cohort and they come from all different nonprofits. One was the son of a person who owned a small business and he was going to be taking over the business and felt that he wanted to understand more about the financial aspects of statistics.

Richard Lenz: 31:42
MBA is very helpful for that. Yeah.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 31:44
It was a tremendous experience. And also as a result when I did have to call a professor, which interestingly you do, things happen particularly when you’re working a full-time job, you have a family. Things happen, and that test that’s scheduled in a 36-hour window that you can take online. Well, maybe you had something that came up that you had to take care of. The professors were wonderful about …

Richard Lenz: 32:08
Flexibilities.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:09
Terrific.

Richard Lenz: 32:09
A key.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:10
And they’re also available. Many of them work as consultants and the private business world and are available even after you graduate for advice.

Richard Lenz: 32:20
Well, I think some evidence, we’re still married, right? You went through all this.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:23
We are.

Richard Lenz: 32:26
And yet we’re still married. I mean, even with all that additional stress and time and all that. I’m making a bad joke here.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:32
And honey, that’s because I learned organizational behavior.

Richard Lenz: 32:36
Perfect. Perfect. Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com.

Richard Lenz: 32:49
And make sure and check out our website for library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s Lenzonbusiness.com. Our presenting sponsor is Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university.

Richard Lenz: 33:04
And don’t forget, you can get your MBA Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. Dr. Lenz, thank you for coming in to the show.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 33:19
Thank you for having me here and for sharing a little bit of your world with me. That was fun.

Richard Lenz: 33:33
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.