Wendy Lenz

Dr. Wendy Lenz, a Graduate of Georgia College’s Web MBA

They say a way to test a romantic relationship is by successfully surviving an IKEA shopping trip. What about interviewing your spouse on a radio show? This week Richard takes a stab at the latter. Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s online MBA program, spent more than 10 years as chief operating officer for the largest cancer practice in the Southeast. Richard and Dr. Lenz examine topics including her interest and experience in both medicine and business, merging the two, and how she ran a company while getting her MBA.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz on 95.5 WSB Atlanta’s News & Talk. Presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Exploring Atlanta’s business leaders and inspiring stories, lessons learned and tips for growth and success.

Richard Lenz: 00:24
Welcome to Lenz on Business. Business talk on WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m host, Richard Lenz. Today, we have a very interesting and special show. I can’t tell you the amount of trouble I’ve gone to, to get this guest in the studio.

Richard Lenz: 00:44
Today, we are with Dr. Wendy Lenz. Dr. Lenz is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill.

Richard Lenz : 00:53
She also received her her MBA at Georgia College. Dr. Lenz has an extensive resume in the business world and she’s co-founded several businesses and nonprofit entities along with working as Chief Operating Officer for more than 10 years for the largest cancer practice in the Southeast. She also happens to be married to me and so our listeners will be very sympathetic as this unwinds I guess. Honey, thanks for coming in.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 01:26
Hi, honey. It only took a piece of jewelry and you making me dinner one night and here I am.

Richard Lenz: 01:32
Well, maybe the price wasn’t too bad, I guess. Well, I thought you would actually be a great guest not just because we are married, but all the conversations we have about business, I think you’re one of the brightest people I’ve ever met and talented. And of course, I’m biased, we got married.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 01:50
No, keep going.

Richard Lenz: 01:51
Whenever I have a business issue, I come to you and you’re always so wise and part of it is hard-earned, because you’ve grown so many different businesses, you’ve been on so many different boards, you’ve run nonprofits. It’s a string of success that’s pretty amazing. It’s not like you were born with a silver spoon in your mouth either.

Richard Lenz: 02:17
So I just have so much respect and admiration for you, and I’m laying it on thick here, but not really, it’s actually how I really feel. And also, in this mix was you decided to get an MBA from Georgia College, which obviously is the sponsor of this show. And I thought you could speak to that as well, and you got that online while you were actually running one of the largest cancer practices in the country.

Richard Lenz: 02:42
So if someone’s able to do that, I think that’s an interesting story for people out there who are maybe thinking about getting that MBA. And of course, Georgia College is a great opportunity to do that, but you can do it online. So, a lot to talk about here. And maybe where I’d like to start is tell me about your upbringing, where are you from and how did you end up in medicine?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 03:03
Well, I can’t let that introduction go by without saying thank you. There’s nothing that is more rewarding or touching than having the person that you love say those kinds of things. So thank you, honey for that.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 03:19
I think that mutual respect in a relationship is really important. And that’s one of my principles from the aspect of business is just respect everyone. Respect your employees, respect your customers. It’s a relationship. So that being said, Thank you.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 03:36
To answer the question that you asked, my business beginnings really started at very early age because I grew up in a farm in Delaware. And although my father was not formally educated in business, nor was my mother, they worked as a team to create this corporate enterprise, if you will, family enterprise that a true mom and pop farm and that’s where I was raised.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 04:02
My four sisters and I were the labor force. And I saw my dad have to work long hours in order to provide income for the family. He worried about the different elements that would come in, the disruptive forces. In the case of farming, it’s pricing, it’s pests, it’s weather. So sometimes different than what we see in other kinds of corporate entities, but he had to deal with all of that. And I remember him working long days and then at night, sitting down with a tablet and a pencil and working the numbers.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 04:40
So that’s really my first foray into business. I don’t think I really understood that until I went on to being in business, but then found so many similarities between my dad a simple hard-working farmer, and what I do and my work as a physician and then moving into a more administrative business role.

Richard Lenz: 05:10
It’s interesting that the role of farming, of course in our economy used to be we were very agriculturally based, and many of us grew up on farms. My folks going back to my grandparents were farmers in Iowa. And today, I think it’s less than 1% of Americans are involved in farming. So think about the productivity of those farmers in this country, it’s amazing. We’re feeding the world with 1%.

Richard Lenz: 05:39
But the other thing I’ve experienced is as I’m out and about and I’m meeting some great business people, so many of them grew up on a farm, and they actually learned so many different lessons of business. And of course, one of them is hard work. Your father, of course, was very hard worker. He actually worked two jobs.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 05:59
That’s right.

Richard Lenz: 06:00
I don’t know how someone can like do a farm, and then also work the midnight shift somewhere. It was really something else.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 06:07
Well, that’s an excellent segue into the other part of your question, which was how did I run a practice and then get an MBA. I had a great role model in my dad, and of course, my mom was right there with him. Although she didn’t work, she took care of all of us and handled the livestock and the garden and all of those other elements that are required to grow up and get your sustenance from the ground.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 06:31
From the standpoint of moving into an MBA and working a full-time job, and my job was very full time at the peak of where we were at the practice where I worked. We had over 500 employees, 60 physicians, multiple other levels of healthcare providers, and we had offices in three states. So it was busy and I was head of operations. As you have often said to me, my superpower is getting things done. So that was my job was to get things done in multiple locations.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 07:09
But in addition to that, I really felt that coming from a background of medicine, I understood medicine, I understood patient care. And from that, I really understood customer service, because I believe that the two are tied together. Your patients are your customers. And if you don’t understand what they’re going through and their whole experience and adapt to that, then you’re not really helping them as much as you can.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 07:39
I also felt that from the financial aspect and just nuts and bolts, human resources, healthcare insurance for own employees, logistics, supply chain management, all of those things are not things that one learns in medical school, and I felt I could help the business more if I had a foundational understanding of what business was truly about.

Richard Lenz: 08:04
It’s interesting in the world of healthcare and physician practices, you need to be more than just a good physician at diagnosing and applying the right treatment, etc, etc. There’s actually a business backbone to it that is very onerous and hard. Regulations, getting paid in all the different ways. How do you bill? How do you collect? How do you attract patients?

Richard Lenz: 08:35
There’s so much to it that doctors I know out there, they’re like pulling their hair out to have a full day of treating patients but then have to go and handle all these aspects. I don’t know how they find time to sleep. It’s so stressful just to be trying to care for people and their outcomes, their health outcomes, but then there’s this whole business side.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 08:57
And I just interrupted you, which I always do.

Richard Lenz: 09:01
Now honey, Come on.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 09:02
One of the fallacies or myths that I think physicians have is I just want to be a physician. I don’t want to deal with any of the business aspects of it. Let somebody else deal with that. But what you’ve just related is so true. You can’t get away from the business components of the business of medicine.

Richard Lenz: 09:19
Right. I think any business that’s out there, whatever its mission is, it will deliver on that mission way better if it’s a healthy business. So how do you have a healthy business and that leads to Lenz, and we market people to give them a better chance at having an even healthier business so they can do more of the things that they need to do to get to their goals.

Richard Lenz: 09:39
You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

Richard Lenz: 09:59
I’m host, Richard Lenz. This week, we’re talking with Dr. Wendy lands, a graduate of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Online Masters Program.

Richard Lenz: 10:09
So you were running this practice. You had pursued becoming a doctor and eventually running operations of this huge oncology practice and they decided to go after getting an MBA, because you just felt like maybe there’s some gaps in your knowledge maybe or you just kind of polish it off.

Richard Lenz: 10:30
You’ve had all this great business experience, but maybe getting an MBA would help you even more. And so you probably searched around, like where to go for that. So tell me a little bit about the process and why you selected Georgia College.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 10:40
You do have different speaks, so to speak. There’s med-speak and there’s business-speak. And as the company grew, what I realized is that I was sitting at the table with the business-speak people, and I needed to be able to convert the med-speak into business-speak. And I had a lot of experience in that, but I wanted to really solidify the foundation and that’s why I want to search for something that would help me to do that. And an MBA seemed to be the best vehicle for that.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 11:22
Obviously, I was not going to be able to take off work to go to a brick and mortar school. I needed to find something online that I could do in my time, so I searched. I wanted an accredited program. I wanted a program that I did not have to take GMATs for, had already had enough of testing through medical school. And I wanted to have a program that would be able to provide me the access to the foundational courses that I needed and Georgia College did all that for me.

Richard Lenz: 11:53
You’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m host Richard Lenz. Brought to you by Georgia college’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Stay tuned.

Richard Lenz: 12:02
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 12:31
We’re back with Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney College of Business. I’m host, Richard Lenz. This week we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Online Masters Program.

Richard Lenz: 12:46
Now Wendy, you happen to be my wife and maybe some people are hearing that in this show today. And I wouldn’t have invited you in if you didn’t have business lessons to give and also a great experience with Georgia College, the web MBA program.

Richard Lenz: 13:02
I wonder if you can address that some more. So you were out there looking for which program to do, and you wanted one that was convenient, and wasn’t super expensive, I guess. I mean compared to some that are out there, and where you didn’t have to quit your job. Tell us what your decision process was when you decided to go with Georgia College’s program.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 13:24
The most important decision was that I wanted an accredited college. I’ve got a certain resume of going to Georgetown University, University of North Carolina, and I wanted to be able to complete that set, if you will, of great educational institutions by choosing a program that had an MBA that was fully accredited and had excellent standing.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 13:52
And as I was doing my research of online programs, which I felt was important. At that time, we had kids that were still at home, and obviously marriage and then the business. There were a lot of balls in the air. So I definitely wanted an online program. As I began searching, Georgia College kept coming up of where they ranked and that they truly were accredited. Many of these programs that are online are not.

Richard Lenz: 14:19
Right. They’re number two best online college ranking, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 14:24
Right.

Richard Lenz: 14:24
It is very attractive.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 14:26
Right. Frankly, the affordability didn’t matter as much to me, but I was, of course, very pleasantly surprised that it was very affordable and it wasn’t a huge commitment, an outlay of cash in order to be able to get this degree. So those were the first criteria that I used in looking at choosing Georgia College.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 14:52
Then I looked at some of the other criteria and how it would affect me. So I had mentioned the GMATs, and taking the graduate aptitude test, which I did not particularly want to do. I knew I would have to study for that, which were more hours and then take this test. Georgia College exempts mid level management and senior executives from taking the GMAT.

Richard Lenz: 15:18
So you can get a waiver, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 15:19
You can get a waiver through an application process.

Richard Lenz: 15:22
Right. Well, if you have this experience, now you have to go take the GMAT and wait for that to happen and then you pay that money and then see your scores? But if you have this great experience, they’ll give you a waiver.

Richard Lenz: 15:32
Well, you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget, you can get your MBA Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

Richard Lenz: 15:54
I’m host Richard Lenz and we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz who’s a graduate of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Online Masters Program. Stay tuned and we’ll come back for more about the program and get some business wisdom from Dr. Wendy Lenz.

Richard Lenz: 16:15
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 16:42
Welcome back to Lenz on Business. I’m host, Richard Lenz. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Masters of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 17:04
This week, we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s, J. Whitney Bunting College of Business Online Masters Program. What a coincidence.

Richard Lenz: 17:14
Dr. Lenz is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine and completed her residency in Internal Medicine at University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. She also received her MBA at Georgia College. Dr. Lenz has an extensive resume in the business world co-founding several businesses and nonprofit entities along with working as Chief Operating Officer for over 10 years for the largest cancer practice in the Southeast.

Richard Lenz: 17:39
She also happens to be married to me and I didn’t think that would disqualify her. I’ve been twisting her arm for years to get her to come in and talk about, if nothing else, her business experience and then with this coincidence of the title sponsor, and then also she got her degree from there. That kind of made sense too. So I thought this would be a good at least twofer. So Wendy, you …

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 18:08
The twisting of the arm was virtual.

Richard Lenz: 18:10
Yeah, it was not …

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 18:11
Just want to make that clear.

Richard Lenz: 18:12
Spousal abuse doesn’t have to be physical, right? I just think you have an incredible American story. You’re one of five daughters worked on a farm and then found your way from the small town, going to the University of Delaware, then getting accepted into Georgetown which is not easy. And then eventually, University of North Carolina to become a doctor. That was your dream to become a doctor.

Richard Lenz: 18:46
Tell me why that was your dream and then tell me at what moment and why did you decide actually business might be more attractive because you got into the business side of things and in healthcare.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 19:01
Well growing up in a farm, my role models at that time and this was … Now, I’m going to date myself, which is okay because that’s part of where wisdom comes from, right? Many experiences over a period of time. But I was growing up on a farm in the 60s, and there were not a lot of job opportunities, if you will, for women that were not what were considered traditional at the time.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 19:27
So women were going to college, my parents very much believed in education. Neither one of them were educated beyond high school. And they always felt that in some way, as part of the American dream that education was the keystone that prevented them from moving forward and having better jobs and being able to earn a better living.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 19:49
So they were adamant that their five daughters were going to receive a college education and they worked very hard to make that dream come true for all of us. My sisters are all in education, which is interesting given that emphasis on it.

Richard Lenz: 20:08
Well, it’s a calling, right? Education.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 20:08
It really is.

Richard Lenz: 20:09
So is medicine.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 20:11
I was kind of marked at an early age from medicine aspect. My sister, one of them, became very, very ill and was actually having seizures. We’re living out on a farm. We’re miles from town. And my mother put a call into our doctor and it was a very traditional family doctor who you call and his wife answers at their home, because his office is in the front porch of his home, and she gets the doctor.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 20:43
And it was late at night and he gets into his car and drives out the miles in the middle of the night. There are no streetlights out in the country and comes in. My mother, who normally was pretty collected and my dad who was always collected we’re very frantic with my sister being unresponsive.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 21:05
He came in, I’m not sure what he did. I’m not sure what tools he even had to be able to do that at that point. But what happened as the result of that visit is that my parents were calm. My sister ultimately got better. He came out and visited. And in my mind, that person created an environment that was healing. And that’s what I wanted to do.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 21:31
I wanted to be able to help people to heal in their stress, in their pain, in their distress. And from that moment, I said that I wanted to be a doctor and I was laughed at. I was kind of ridiculed about it, because that’s not what little girls did in the 60s. They didn’t want to be a doctor. And I had people that helped me to achieve that goal along the way.

Richard Lenz: 22:00
Well, pursuing an MD then, of course, is a very stressful path of study and education. And it takes many, many years, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 22:11
It does take a lot of years, although pain has no memory. And as I recall it, yes, it was stressful and it was difficult, but it was something that I really wanted to do. I love doing it. I loved learning about medicine. The body is such an amazing organism. It’s a miracle. And to be able to learn about that miracle and understand how it worked was fascinating and very rewarding for me.

Richard Lenz: 22:40
You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget, you can get your MBA Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

Richard Lenz: 23:02
I’m host Richard Lenz, and we’re talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz who’s a graduate of the program we were just discussing. We’re talking about her background. So you decide to become a physician and you become one, but at some point you started also developing an interest in business. Is there a moment where you had an epiphany that, “Hey, I might pursue the business side of things.” How did your goals changed, your mission change? Had your story changed?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 23:32
I can’t say that I had an epiphany so much as I had cumulative experiences. And as you know, honey, I’m very directive and I like being in charge, and I like being in control.

Richard Lenz: 23:45
True story.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 23:47
What I found is that I was increasingly frustrating taking care of patients. At this point, I was able to see maybe 10 people a day in my private practice and I saw so many opportunities that could be changed, where the things that I saw, how we worked, how patients came in the office, that could be improved. So that the patient experience could be improved. But that I couldn’t do that, because I was seeing 15 patients a day.

Richard Lenz: 24:21
Right. I sort of call that the multiplier effect. So you start putting yourself in a position to actually do more than that actual hands-on piece, which is sometimes the most satisfying.

Richard Lenz: 24:31
I look at my own career. I have a journalism degree, and then I was writing the stories and doing other things in journalism. And then I realized, well, actually the people that own those communication channels were making a lot of decisions.

Richard Lenz: 24:45
And actually, if I could be in a better position over communication channels, then I could be doing more than just writing that one story. Not that, that isn’t also super important, but there would be a multiplier effect of sort of positive communication to help communities, people, organizations, etc. So I also pivoted into business to have like a bigger impact. And it sounds like that’s what was sort of appealing to you.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 25:10
It absolutely was. And it did evolve over time through various jobs. I had an interest in hospice and palliative care and a segment of our population that we tend not to want to talk about and ignore those people that are suffering from incurable diseases and dying.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 25:31
And whether it was my farm background where life and death were very much linked and normal to a certain degree, or whether it was really the very compassionate training that I had at Georgetown that valued every life.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 25:50
I felt a calling to go into hospice, and that was one of the first businesses that I help to co-found. There, we had to do everything, so I became quality control. I had to write the rules. I had to help staff from a nursing standpoint.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 26:11
If the supply manager couldn’t bring out a wheelchair or a bed, I had one in my car and I was seeing patients at home. Ultimately, through that experience, I was tapped if you will to develop a lot of those programs in hospice and palliative care with this large cancer practice and to bring those there.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 26:35
And then that naturally evolved here. We had many offices and we had differences in the way that our patients were being taken care of in one office to the other. The way to standardize that was through applying basic business principles of customer service, of logistics, of supply chain management, all of that with this overlay of the art of medicine.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 27:01
So it grew from there, and I just started to have that same passion and love for what business could do as a tool to be able to help our patients get better care, standardized care, whether they were in South Georgia, or they were in the hills of North Carolina.

Richard Lenz: 27:20
Well, Frank Lloyd Wright, the architect wrote that there’s actually no better education and experience. And I think that’s kind of true. But also, isn’t it great to go to school and kind of fill in the gaps in that experience and there’s a value? And so you decided to pursue that web MBA at Georgia College?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 27:41
I absolutely did. And I probably didn’t even really understand how helpful it was until we were sitting down across the table negotiating the sale of this practice, and the “business people” that were non-medical started talking about valuation techniques. And I understood what they were talking about. I understood the language. I understood the methodology that they were using because of my MBA.

Richard Lenz: 28:10
Yeah. That’s why the bean counters they have their bean counter language, right? And if you know the bean counter language, then they kind of go, “Maybe her opinions have some value.”

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 28:22
But what it does is it truly gave me a seat at the table.

Richard Lenz: 28:27
You’ve been listening to Lenz on Business with guest, Dr. Wendy Lenz. Stay tuned for more. Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Richard Lenz: 29:06
You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m host, Richard Lenz. Today’s show, we’ve been talking with Dr. Wendy Lenz, a graduate of Georgia College’s. J. Whitney Bunting College of Business Online Masters Program, also happens to be my lovely wife. And I had to twist her arm to come in here. Well actually, it’s more emotional twist your arm, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 29:34
Right.

Richard Lenz: 29:35
Okay. Anyway, I think maybe it would be good to give our listeners a taste of what was it actually like being in the program. How long was the program? Was it one weekend?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 29:48
No.

Richard Lenz: 29:48
And a lot of trust falls or was it … What it involved. A kind of interesting part of it is the group dynamic. You work on the group projects and that kind of thing and kind of make some friends.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:02
Yes. That was one of the things that I was surprised about, because you can’t always see deep into a program when you’re looking at it online. But I like the fact that I got to actually meet the people. There was an element of bricks and mortar.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:19
When you’re sitting around in a classroom, you’re seeing everyone there and you get to know what’s going on with their lives. It’s team building, just like you do on business.

Richard Lenz: 30:27
Right. The program kicks off with first a meeting, right?

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:29
Right. There’s an orientation and it’s on site. Generally, it’s been held in Atlanta. All of the professors come, so you meet the professors that you’re going to see in the 18 month program, which is how long in general it is. You also meet the administrators who help grease the wheels when you have any difficulty or problems in meeting schedules, timelines, whatever.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 30:53
And then your cohort is selected and they do this through an interesting way of trying to match your personalities so that you don’t have all maybe type A’s. Not saying that I am. I am. But obviously, if there were six Wendy’s in a group, we would probably come to fisticuffs on our group session. So they do an excellent job of matching the type of person. And it’s very helpful for people to understand that.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 31:25
So I got to meet my cohort and they come from all different nonprofits. One was the son of a person who owned a small business and he was going to be taking over the business and felt that he wanted to understand more about the financial aspects of statistics.

Richard Lenz: 31:42
MBA is very helpful for that. Yeah.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 31:44
It was a tremendous experience. And also as a result when I did have to call a professor, which interestingly you do, things happen particularly when you’re working a full-time job, you have a family. Things happen, and that test that’s scheduled in a 36-hour window that you can take online. Well, maybe you had something that came up that you had to take care of. The professors were wonderful about …

Richard Lenz: 32:08
Flexibilities.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:09
Terrific.

Richard Lenz: 32:09
A key.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:10
And they’re also available. Many of them work as consultants and the private business world and are available even after you graduate for advice.

Richard Lenz: 32:20
Well, I think some evidence, we’re still married, right? You went through all this.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:23
We are.

Richard Lenz: 32:26
And yet we’re still married. I mean, even with all that additional stress and time and all that. I’m making a bad joke here.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 32:32
And honey, that’s because I learned organizational behavior.

Richard Lenz: 32:36
Perfect. Perfect. Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com.

Richard Lenz: 32:49
And make sure and check out our website for library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s Lenzonbusiness.com. Our presenting sponsor is Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s public liberal arts university.

Richard Lenz: 33:04
And don’t forget, you can get your MBA Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. Dr. Lenz, thank you for coming in to the show.

Dr. Wendy Lenz: 33:19
Thank you for having me here and for sharing a little bit of your world with me. That was fun.

Richard Lenz: 33:33
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.