Alan Johnson and Dale Doss, graduates of Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business

So you really want that masters degree in business, but you think it might be too late. It’s never too late to go back to school, and this week’s guests are living proof. Both Johnson and Doss decided to go after a masters degree in their mid-to-late 50s. Despite some trepidation, they not only graduated, but both rocked 4.0 grade point averages. They join guest host Jon Waterhouse and talk about what it was like jumping head first into Georgia College’s Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management online program and how it’s enhancing their careers.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for a Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz. On News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leaders’ inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: 00:26
You’ve always dreamed of getting a master’s degree to enhance your business career, but for one reason or another something kept getting in your way. Now, after all these years, the time is right, but you wonder if it’s too late to go back to school.

Welcome to Lenz On Business business talk on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting, College of Business. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’ll be hearing from two executives who decided to go back to school in their mid to late 50s. Despite some trepidation, they dove in and, not only graduated, but they both rocked 4.0 grade point averages and it changed their lives.

Here to share their stories, please welcome
Dale Doss. He’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson. He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm. Both
Alan and
Dale earned their master of logistics and supply chain management via Georgia College’s online program and they worked in the same cohort.

They’ll be talking about their experiences right here with us today. You can learn more about Georgia College’s graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Alan,
Dale, welcome to the show.

Alan Johnson: 01:51
Thank you. Glad to be here.

Dale Doss: 01:52
Good to be here.

Jon Waterhouse: 01:53
I think the most fascinating thing about both of your continuing business education stories is you each went back to school in your 50s. Most students go back for their master’s in their late 20s or early 30s. The theme of this week’s show is, it’s never too late to go back to school and do something to enhance your career. Let’s talk a little bit about that continuing education and the importance of it.

What do you guys think?

Dale Doss: 02:19
Yeah.
Jon, it’d been 30 years since I graduated with my undergraduate degree. It’s something that I had a hunger to do for a long, long time, but life had gotten in the way. There were things that happened.

On two occasion, I started to start an EMBA program and things happened and I think, well, most people will identify with stories, business situations happen, situations happened with families, but about 30 years later, I’d looked at it and said, “The time is now.”

In my case, it was sort of like that now-or-never type situation and I made the decision and it just so happens too that the Georgia College program came about about the right time for me and it aligned really well with my personal history and my goals and I was able to enroll and get started there.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:16

Alan, what about you? What led you to go to graduate school in your 50s?

Alan Johnson : 03:19
Well, for me, my wife is a retired school teacher. She has every degree known to man, I think, but it seemed like every time I got ready to go back, it was time for her to go back and get another degree. Then, after we got finished with that line, then the kids went to college. There was somebody always in school or in higher education in my family for quite some time.

Then, when all that got settled, I figured, “It’s my turn.” Then, like
Dale, I found the GCSU program that was attractive to me for … It could fit into my schedule and I had wanted to go back to graduate school for 25 years probably and finish an MBA and this program and the time commitments and everything lined up pretty good with where I was at in my career.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:11
Did either of you guys have any concern about going back to school more than 25 years after you first graduated? I mean, as executives, you both were working hard, you had families, but now it’s back to homework and projects on top of an already busy schedule.

Dale Doss: 04:27
Yeah. There were concerns. I’m not going to speak for
Alan, but I can tell you that the summer before I started the program, I had already pre-enrolled. I decided to go ahead and do a small sort of sampler class related to quantitative analysis. I think I ended up making a 70 on that first one, and I’m thinking to myself, “Do I really, really want to go back and do this?” I mean-

Alan Johnson : 04:51
And did … I’m sorry.

Dale Doss: 04:53
You go ahead, but the-

Alan Johnson : 04:54
Then the first class they throw at you, that Dr. Monroe and the team down there throw at you, is quantitative analysis. And so, that whole-

Jon Waterhouse: 05:01
That just makes my head hurt-

Alan Johnson : 05:02
Yeah, I was like, ”
Dale, I-

Jon Waterhouse: 05:04
… listening to you say the word.

Alan Johnson : 05:04
It had been 30 years since I had had anything, I used a little bit of quantitative analysis, statistical measures and things like that at work, but it had been years since I had played with that and that’s the very first class they throw at you. It took quite a bit of time to absorb all of that back into my brain and get it back going.

Dale Doss: 05:25
Yeah. I would suggest you’re a lot like me, but halfway through that first semester I was thinking to myself-

Alan Johnson : 05:31
What have I done? What have I done, yeah.

Dale Doss: 05:32
… “Really? Really? Can I really make it through this?” There were some doubts, but once you get started in something like that, you set a goal and you start setting the disciplines and you set the time aside, it starts playing upon itself and you start building some momentum, but the first part of it was difficult.

Jon Waterhouse: 05:51

Dale, just to go back a little bit about how you found out about the program, we want to give a little shout out to WSB, because I believe it was because of a commercial?

Dale Doss: 05:59
Yeah. I was on my way. I was in the commute like everybody else here in Atlanta and the traffic … It was around 6:30 AM or something like that in the early morning. I was on my way to my job and heard the commercial and I was already thinking about, whether it was going to be doing an EMBA program or something of that nature.

Then the commercial came on, and I’m thinking, “That sounds like it’s perfect for me.” Then, “There’s some research to be done on the backside of it,” but the more and more I researched, the more and more I found out that it was the right thing. But, yes, it started with a commercial I heard on WSB.

Alan Johnson: 06:34
I, as well, heard it on WSB. That’s how I got mine. Then, like
Dale, I went back and I researched it through the internet and things like that and decided, “This is the program for me.”

Jon Waterhouse: 06:43
Right now you’re on and everyone is listening to WSB, Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started.

I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and this week we’re chatting with a pair of graduates of Georgia College’s online graduate business program,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson.

Now, guys, you both register for graduate school and your classes are online. When you were originally in college, the internet didn’t even exist as it does today. Did you have some concern about online learning?

Alan Johnson : 07:29
No, I didn’t. Not really. I had some misconceptions about online learning. I thought, “Well, it’s online, so it’s going to be easier.” Nothing could be further from the truth.

Dale Doss: 07:39
No.

Alan Johnson : 07:39
The online learning to me is, for me personally, it was more in-depth. I had to do more work, more research, more independent work to find out answers to questions rather than going to a class or calling Dr. Monroe, Dr. Wiggins, and finding out, “How do I do this?” It was far more challenging from a work-time perspective than I thought it would be, but in the flip side of that, as far as time management, it was a little bit easier to manage my time, because I didn’t have to be somewhere at any certain time of the day.

Dale Doss: 08:15
Yeah. I didn’t have any idea how the program would actually play out from a standpoint of online, but when we went down to the orientation in Milledgeville, I was able to see for the first time, how things were going to play out. We’re immersed in the same technologies all the time. We’re using this stuff on the job all the time, whether it’s mobile or internet-based, or a lot of email traffic and things of that nature.

It’s not like it’s cutting-edge technology to us, because we’re using it every day in our jobs. To do it in an education standpoint was unique to me and was something that was new. Coming from where we came from, when I graduated in ’85 and back further than that, education was, oftentimes, more of where you sat down in there sort of, but download from an instructor, you absorb everything you can, you retain what you can and you test on it.

In this particular case, on the online program, there was a great deal more investment of myself personally into the process. I’m not going to say it was self-taught, because that’s not the case at all. I mean, we had a lot of collaborative effort, a lot of team effort, a lot of interaction with our teachers and professors who were, by the way, located around the globe in some places like Hawaii and south Georgia and different places.

Jon Waterhouse: 09:42
Wow.

Dale Doss: 09:42
But, it’s a different type of learning environment for someone that didn’t come up that way. You’re correct in assuming that it would be different, but it was one that … actually I’ve become a great deal more comfortable with, because it required your own personal investment into it. No one was sitting there downloading into you and investing into you. You’re investing into yourself and, personally, I think the learning experience, the retention rates and things that I saw coming out of it were a great deal better.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:15
I was going to ask you that, because you were talking about, it required you to dig deeper and really invest yourself.

Alan Johnson : 10:22
One thing to me that’s unique about the online learning experience, and I make this comment, Dr. Monroe has asked me to come back a couple times and speak to new cohorts coming in, and one thing I tell them is, “Your objective and how you will get through these problems a lot better is you learn more from the other people in your cohort than you ever do from Dr. Monroe, Dr. Williams and the different professors in the program.”

That’s the thing where you can learn so much more from each other. I learned so much from
Dale, because his expertise in the field of logistics is different from mine and I learned far more than I want to know about international transportation from
Dale, and he probably learned more about domestic transportation from me than he ever wanted to learn, but the key is learning from each other.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:10
Let’s talk about time management. You did say that that was something that you really saw as advantageous to online learning. How did you manage your time and shuffle about around a little bit?

Dale Doss: 11:21
It takes some discipline, because in the same way I said you’re investing, instead of someone downloading with you in a classroom environment where you know you have to be at a classroom at 8:30, 7:30, whatever the case may be, you have to discipline yourself. In my particular case, I’m not going to speak for
Alan, but I was home every evening between 6:30 and seven o’clock. My family knew that my time was sort of off limits. I basically went to my office at home and spent time there from seven till 10 o’clock every evening. Pretty much Monday through Friday.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:55

Alan, when we come back, I want to hear about your time management techniques.

You’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse, and we’re chatting with
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson, graduates of Georgia College’s online business program. Speaking of Georgia College, it’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. We’ll be back with more Lenz on Business in just a moment.
Richard Lenz: 12:32
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business. Presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 13:02
On this week’s Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J Whitney Bunting College of Business, we’re learning a valuable lesson about continuing business education, it’s never too late. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and we’re chatting with
Dale Doss. He’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson.

He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm. Both
Alan and
Dale earned their Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program. They actually worked in the same cohort, and you can learn more about Georgia College’s graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now,
Alan, tell me a little bit more about your time management techniques when it came to your online studies.

Alan Johnson : 13:56
They tell you when you come into the program that it’s not hard, but it’s rigorous. That is a very, very, I think, accurate description of the program. It does require a good amount of time, but it is manageable if you budget your time. I tried, personally, to get as much done as I could throughout the week. Lunch times, I would come in early for work, matter of fact,
Dale and I did a lot of stuff early in the morning. We would talk 5:30, six o’clock in the morning a lot of times and-

Jon Waterhouse: 14:27
Wow.

Dale Doss: 14:27
A lot of cell phone calls while we were driving.

Alan Johnson : 14:29
Cell phone calls in the car and that sort of stuff, as well as some other people in the cohort, but I tried to get as much work done throughout the week as I could. That meant sometimes working till midnight or later, writing papers, reading articles, reading our textbooks or whatever, and tried my best to have my weekends as free as possible to give to my family. I think
Dale worked more weekends than I did.

Dale Doss: 14:58
Yeah. I worked a pretty good bid on Saturday and Sunday. I mean, I found the investment of time, once again, once you get into the program, the investment was driven by the attainment in the learnings in the objectives and the syllabuses that are set out for you for each one of the courses. Investment had to be steady every evening.

I can’t think of too many nights I took off and then I worked a lot on weekends and a lot of it was driven by, was the project due? Why did you have to do, how much collaboration did you need, and we got it done. It was a significant investment of time. Those that are to think about going into the program, need to at least understand that you do need some self-discipline and you do need to schedule some time.

Alan Johnson : 15:44
I would say, plan that ahead, plan that ahead before you go into the program. As far as when you’re going to spend your time investing into this program.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:54
You both earned your Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management.
Dale, I understand you have a great love for supply chain. Why is that?

Dale Doss: 16:02
I started off in late 80s, excuse me. In the 90s I worked for almost nine years with Walmart, growing up in that organization in the supply chain area and had a chance to get involved in global activities in China back in, that was back in 1994 …

Jon Waterhouse: 16:24
Wow.

Dale Doss: 16:25
… with Walmart. To me, it’s just a field that allows you to experience a lot of cultural things that you just flat out can’t experience in other business positions, so that’s one of the things I love about it.

Jon Waterhouse: 16:40
Fascinating. Fascinating. You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and complete the form to get started.

I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re talking with a pair of graduates of Georgia College’s online graduate business program,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson. We’ll be back for more Lenz on Business after news, weather and traffic right here on WSB.
Richard Lenz: 17:20
Hi. This is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 17:47
Welcome back to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business, and it’s never too late to go back to school and this week’s guests are living proof.

These two executives decided to go back to school in their mid to late 50s and, despite some trepidation, they dove in and, not only graduated, but both rocked 4.0 grade point averages. We’re talking with
Dale Doss, he’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson. He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm.

Both
Alan and
Dale earned their Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management via Georgia College’s online program and they worked in the same cohort. We’re going to be talking about their experiences for the rest of the program. You can learn more about Georgia College’s graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now, fellas, at the executive level, I imagine it feels like you know quite a lot already. Did you guys feel like, “Hey, what could I possibly learn at this point in my career”?

Dale Doss: 19:12
I mean, there’s a part of me that thought that I’m going to sign up for this program, I’m going to sign my name and I’m going to get a piece of paper. I mean, because you’ve been in a field for a long time, you’re going back to get a master’s degree in the field after you’ve served or worked in that field for 20-plus years, and you’re thinking to yourself, “Yeah, they’re going to teach me a lot. Really?”

Then you get into it and the more you peel it back, the more that you find out that there are a lot of things you know, there’s a lot of textbook stuff that you could repeat, that you could teach, maybe, even to a certain point, but what you find out is, is that old Covey term of sharpening the saw. It’s that seventh habit where you go back and you just keep drilling on things.

I mean, it’s really good to take it in over almost two years and to go back and revisit everything that you’re doing because, what you do in business oftentimes is you keep doing more and more about less and less, so you become an expert at certain things. You refine and you hone those skills, but then you get into a situation in this course where you see things from a much broader perspective.

It’s just a fantastic learning environment to go back and revisit. One of the things that you cannot underestimate is the amount of impact it will make on how you view, all of a sudden, your work life again and how you change your view on how you see the problems that you’re working through in the office as well.

Jon Waterhouse: 20:49

Alan, did you feel the same?

Alan Johnson : 20:50
Yeah. Like I had mentioned before, not that I didn’t learn a lot from Dr. Monroe in the faculty there, I did, and I’m still continuing to learn from Dr. Monroe as I mentioned earlier, I think, to you
Jon privately, but working on some projects now with Dr. Monroe, so I continue to learn from him, but I learned as much or more from
Dale and the other members of the cohort as I did from, as
Dale said, the textbook sharpening the saw.

The basic classes, the logistics supply chain stuff, I do that. I’ve been doing it, it’s like drinking water for me, but when we got into the more analytical part of different business cases and things like that, then it became challenging and that’s some of the areas where I really learned a lot is when we would work together as a group on different business cases and some of them were quite challenging. The Penguin Publishing one was interesting.

Jon Waterhouse: 21:52
Now, let’s talk about Dr. Carl Monroe. We had him on the program a little while back. He’s a Georgia College professor and also the Director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program. Off the air, both of you referred to him as a legend in the industry.

Dale Doss: 22:10
His involvement in the program, to me, once I heard the commercial on WSB and I’ve started researching the program, his involvement in the program legitimized the program from my standpoint and gave me confidence that I was going to be participating in a program that would be a professional enhancement to me.

Alan Johnson : 22:29
Yeah. I will rehash what
Dale said, but one thing about Carl to me, or Dr. Monroe, to me that’s impressive is, you see a lot of guys in the academic world, but a lot of the guys in the academic world cannot relate to private business and to industry and what’s going on. Carl has a unique sense of what’s going on in the economic environment of the country.

Globally, how the stuff that he teaches applies every day. I’ll say this about Dr. Monroe, a lot of the guys that I see in that, they take it as a job. Carl takes it as a passion, and he genuinely cares about his students and he genuinely cares about whether they learned something or not. It was a fantastic experience under him and I couldn’t have asked for anything any better to learn under him.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:20
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and this week we’re chatting with a pair of graduates of Georgia College’s online graduate business program,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson.

Now, guys, you are also talking about the cohort and the kind of educational osmosis, if you will, that you were experiencing learning from each other in the group. You guys became, not only friends, but comrades in the program, working together, phone calls early in the morning talking and now, from what I’ve understood off the air when you were explaining that you guys often draw upon each other now after graduation, post-program, asking questions, business advice, et cetera.

Can you explain the cohort and the importance of that in this program?

Alan Johnson : 24:24
Going as a cohort, I looked around and
Dale and I were, obviously by far, the oldest people in the cohort. That had a natural attraction. He and I becoming, not only partners in this venture, but also we’re friends outside of that and have remained friends, but I looked around the cohort and all these young people and I was like, the surprising thing to me is like, “What can I learn from this young female in a cohort?”

Man, I was blown away. I mean, these kids are sharp. They are really sharp and I learned a lot from the cohort, the younger people in the cohort, as much as I did from
Dale. It was a great experience in working in the different teams, working with different people from different industries, age groups, different backgrounds, a real learning experience. It was great.

Dale Doss: 25:12
I was impressed with the younger classmates, a lot of them were dealing with family conflicts and scheduling and young families and things that I had used as excuses to put off mine, going back to school.

Alan Johnson : 25:25
I think we had three babies born in our cohort, in the two years in the cohort.

Dale Doss: 25:30
I think you’re right. I put my education off for a while and here we were surrounded by people who were plowing right through and they were dealing with the distractions of life and going forward with it. That was impressive to me. I felt an obligation, as someone who was older within the cohort, to make sure too that we were sharing our experiences and, like you said, we learned a lot from people of all ages in the cohort.

I think it was that virtual classroom. The one thing you asked earlier about the difference of what we expected with the technology and learning environment. That was one of the things that did surprise me quite a bit as the class unfolded was, there was a lot more collaboration versus independent learning.

Jon Waterhouse: 26:21
Let’s talk about how this experience has enhanced your careers going forward.

Alan Johnson : 26:27
Well, I have always had a goal of teaching in college. I didn’t want to teach high school, and I’ve had that opportunity. I haven’t reacted to it or done it yet. I’ve had the opportunity to teach a couple of classes, I just haven’t done it yet, but also wanting to do some business consulting.

In the consulting world and the industry that we’re in, a master’s degree is pretty much required and it is, obviously, required to teach on the college level. That was my two main focuses or my two main reasons for going into the program and it’s allowed me to do some things today that I’d never would’ve been able to do. I would have been doing the same thing I had been doing for years, and that was managing logistics and supply chain organizations.

Dale Doss: 27:17
I would go back to the point on my involvement was, it was a personal goal of mine and not that I just checked off one of my goals, but it was something that I hungered to do and wanted to do very badly and was able to get it done. But from an experience standpoint, it definitely enhanced the way I approach my work. It gave me a great deal more …

It allowed me to think differently as I approached the business on a daily basis. It allowed me to sort of step back and see the business in a much more strategic way. Once again, we’re so often dealing with details and details and details on our daily basis, in our work. It allowed me to step back and see things a lot more strategic.

Alan Johnson : 28:01
For me, it allowed me to think more outside the box. You do the same thing every day and you don’t get a different perspective of how things can work, but being in a cohort, going through the master’s program, it has taught me now to rely on other resources for information as I come into a project and things like that. The value to me also has been this bank of resources that I have, and a different way that I think about things.

Jon Waterhouse: 28:27
You were mentioning earlier, and I brought it back up, about the connections that you made and how you can apply those connections in the business world today.

Alan Johnson : 28:36
Right. We were talking about earlier,
Dale is a expert in international logistics. I’ve done it before, but he knows 10 times more than I do, so if I’ve got something that comes up in my world about international logistics, I pick up the phone and I call
Dale.

Dale Doss: 28:53
Yeah. I recently had a situation where I needed some advice related to transportation and transportation tracking and I went out to
Alan, texted him, and said, “Hey, let’s talk.” You learn that there’s people within the program that you can call on and that you can get advice and use as a screening tool.

Jon Waterhouse: 29:15
We are going to be getting some more advice from
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson. It’s never too late to go back to school and enhance your business career.

You’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s, J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget Marketing Matters and Lenz Knows Marketing from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations. Think smart. Think creative. Think Lenz. Learn more L-E-N-Zmarketing.com. This is
Jon Waterhouse. You’re listening to Lenz on Business, we’ll be back in just a moment.
Richard Lenz: 29:53
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business Presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:20
You’re locked in the Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse and this week we’ve been talking with
Dale Doss. He’s currently VP of Supply Chain and Operations for ASP Global, a medical products company, and
Alan Johnson. He’s a logistics consultant for North Highland, a worldwide consulting firm. Both
Alan and
Dale, they earned their Master of Logistics and Supply chain management via Georgia College’s online program.

They worked in the same cohort and we’ve been talking about their experiences in the graduate school program, the online program, and you can learn more about Georgia Colleges’ graduate business programs at makeyournextmove.org.

Now, guys, now that it’s done and you’re taking that application, you’re using it in your careers, was the online graduate business program at Georgia College worth it? Was it worth the blood, the sweat, the tears, the time?

Dale Doss: 31:21
It was worth it. It wasn’t an investment that I felt had to be made on my part. It was a hunger that I had to finish, but in the end I got so much more out of it than I expected than just crossing off a to-do list item.

Alan Johnson : 31:37
Yeah. Same with me. I got far more out of it than I thought. We ask about the program and another thing that was very attractive to me was the affordability of it. When you compared it to other programs, and the fact that it’s got Dr. Monroe’s name on it, it’s extremely affordable and I think that it was a good investment of my time, energies and resources to get it done.

Jon Waterhouse: 32:03
You guys have been in the industry for many years, 25-plus years, I believe. Now you’ve taken the course, you’ve gotten your masters, how have you seen logistics and supply chain change through the years?

Alan Johnson : 32:15
Yeah. One of the things that’s always been a thing that I’ve seen in theme and many years in supply chain, and I came out of Auburn University with a degree in industrial management, there was no logistics degree and migrated into the logistics field. The logistics field forever has been dominated by 50-something-year-old white men like
Dale and I. I’ve always wanted the industry to be …

I always thought that the industry needed to be more diverse, with more women, more minorities, that sort of stuff into the field and into the industry. And I’m seeing it change, I really am. I’m seeing it change and it’s very refreshing to see these women in supply chain. I think
Dale had a young woman he hired at another company that was extremely sharp, and some of the women that were in the program. My encouragement to people, young women and … we need that in this industry. We need that in the industry, with different ideas and different focuses.

Dale Doss: 33:16
The industry’s changing like a lot of industries. One thing that you have to keep your eyes on is technology. Just like we talked about technology related to the school, in this particular program, technology within the industry, especially information sharing, blockchain, there’s so many things that are out there on the horizon. It’s become a technology-driven field. It’s not just the matter of people moving products physically, it’s a matter of moving information along with products and the whole industry has progressed and changed along with technology.

Jon Waterhouse: 33:48
Great perspective from our special guest today. Thanks so much to Georgia College business grads,
Dale Doss and
Alan Johnson, for hanging out with us this week. Lens on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Like Chris and his team help build your financial future, visit dynamicmoney.com, and don’t forget to check out our website for our library of past shows lenzonbusiness.com.

That’s L-E-N-Zonbusiness.com. Of course, the whole shebang brought to you by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. You can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and fill out the form to get started. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse. We will see you next week on Lenz on Business.
Richard Lenz: 34:47
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s G-C-S-U.edu/business.