Dr. Karl Manrodt, Professor of LSCM, Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business

As consumers in today’s world, we want our products yesterday. We often forget it takes logistics to store and deliver goods and services for the public. And there’s so much more to it than that. Dr. Manrodt, an expert in the field, sheds light on this specialty and what the future holds for logistics as we trek further into the 21st century.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: (00:02)
It’s time for Lenz on Business with Richard Lenz, on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leaders, inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: (00:27)
As consumers in today’s world. We want our products yesterday. Amazon Prime, UPS, FedEx, and others continue to spoil us, and businesses are feeling that pressure. Goods and services require storage space and need to be delivered efficiently and steadily to customers. That’s the concept of logistics in a nutshell, but there’s much more to it than that.

Jon Waterhouse: (00:51)
Welcome to Lenz on Business, business talk here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’ll be learning about logistics and why Georgia is a logistics and transportation state. Here to share his logistics savvy is Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online master’s program for working professionals.

Jon Waterhouse: (01:31)
Dr. Manrodt has more than 25 years in logistics, transportation and supply chain research. Some of these projects have been funded by the likes of Oracle, FedEx, Ernst & Young, and the U.S. Department of State. He is the co-author of seven books and has given more than 150 presentations across the globe. Learn more about Georgia Colleges online Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program at makeyournextmove.org. Dr. Manrodt, welcome to the show.

Karl Manrodt: (02:03)
Thank you very much, Jon. I need to congratulate you. You pronounced my name correctly.

Jon Waterhouse: (02:10)
Thanks to your voicemail message. I had it all wrong, and at the last minute I listened to the voicemail message. Boom, I got it.

Karl Manrodt: (02:17)
Very good.

Jon Waterhouse: (02:19)
I gave a brief description of logistics earlier, but what exactly is logistics? Can you give us your expert definition but in layman’s terms?

Karl Manrodt: (02:28)
Well, I’ll do what I do to the students. How’s that?

Jon Waterhouse: (02:30)
Okay, yeah.

Karl Manrodt: (02:30)
So that will be the intro version of what logistics is all about.

Jon Waterhouse: (02:34)
Great.

Karl Manrodt: (02:35)
If you think about logistics, it’s everything involved with moving and storing of goods. That’s kind of like the older definition, but it really is around planning, implementing, and controlling all of those processes. So if you think about getting bottled water into the station, how do we actually do that is really a logistical issue. So I need to think about moving from an origin all the way through to a destination to get that product in. So that’s logistics in the broader term. Within an organization, that’s what they focus in on. How do I do my part of it?

Karl Manrodt: (03:06)
Now there’s another term that you kind of talked about a little bit, it was this idea about supply chains, right?

Jon Waterhouse: (03:12)
Right.

Karl Manrodt: (03:12)
Supply chains are a lot broader than just logistics. So logistics would be what one or two companies are working on together to manage those processes. A supply chain would be everybody involved in it, right? So if I bring in a product in from Asia as an example, right? I’m going to have multiple parties involved with it. The ocean, transportation companies, trucking, ocean, air, I’ve got customs, right? It lands in the Port of Savannah, how do we get it out of the port, and then moving all the way through that process to get it in. So all that process would really be involved with the supply chain.

Jon Waterhouse: (03:49)
And it’s huge. What a chain.

Karl Manrodt: (03:51)
It is very large and it’s getting more complicated as we go along. So when you even talked about getting things yesterday, that’s really where the movement is, not just getting it as soon as possible, but even made as soon as possible and then deliver it to my home. But we’ll talk about that in a little bit.

Jon Waterhouse: (04:09)
I’m looking forward to that because that involves me. That’s a very selfish reason.

Karl Manrodt: (04:14)
We’ll talk about you all day long. That’s fine.

Jon Waterhouse: (04:17)
So Karl, you have a PhD in Logistics and Transportation from the University of Tennessee. What drew you to this concentration? Obviously, a lot of interesting layers in the whole topic of logistics.

Karl Manrodt: (04:30)
That’s an interesting question. I think only by the grace of God, I actually listened to my wife for the first time. We had been married about five years and she goes, “You really ought to think about getting a degree,” and move up in what I was doing. I ended up with a master’s degree in logistics at Wright State University. But then I interned with a company in Corby, England. Now you got to go back to 1987. The Internet wasn’t really that big a deal.

Jon Waterhouse: (04:57)
I had a mullet.

Karl Manrodt: (05:00)
I don’t know if I can get that out of my head right now.

Karl Manrodt: (05:03)
That’s a scary thought, you know? I had a beard.

Jon Waterhouse: (05:07)
All right.

Karl Manrodt: (05:07)
So that’s also a scary thought. But I got a call back in ’87 and at five o’clock in the morning it said, “Hey, do you want to come to Corby and intern?” I interned with this great company, got a great experience, wrote an article about that with another faculty member, and she encouraged me to get a PhD. So long story short, it’s really a series of listening to people in your life to say, “Well, this is a really cool area. You ought to get into it,” and haven’t looked back since.

Jon Waterhouse: (05:32)
Logistics of course looking forward, logistics can make or break a business. So explain why logistics really matters.

Karl Manrodt: (05:41)
Well, I think it goes back to your opening comment. We want everything yesterday, right? So as that desire from a consumer increases and that demand to get things today within two hours, logistics will become much more critical to the organization to deliver that as quickly and effectively as possible. So firms that can do that are going to go ahead and win. Firms that cannot do that and get stuck in their path in saying, “This is how we deliver products, services as well,” are going to go ahead and fail. It’s just a matter of time.

Jon Waterhouse: (06:14)
You’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems, online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Dr Karl Manrodt, a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

Jon Waterhouse: (06:51)
Now let’s talk about logistics right here in the great state of Georgia, Karl. What’s the climate like these days?

Karl Manrodt: (06:57)
The climate is really good and we have a lot of structure to be thankful for, but also leadership. So if you were to take, for instance, the Port of Savannah, it’s the fourth largest container port in the United States. It’s the largest on the East Coast, and we’ve been blessed by two things. One is very good and consistent leadership at the port. I arrived back into Georgia in 2000 and Doug Marchand was the director at that point. Curtis took over after that, and now Lynch is in charge. All three have really followed a very strong, sustainable path for growth. And so they’ve had that vision and they’ve managed that vision very well.

Karl Manrodt: (07:40)
Let me give you a number behind that. When I got here the first year in 2000, they have a State of the Port Address in Savannah and we hit around 900,000 TEUs. Now a TEU is a box. So when you’re on the highway and you see the boxes on a semi, that’s a container. And a TEU is a 20-foot equivalent unit, all right? So we moved in the state of Georgia back in 2000 about 930,000 of those.

Karl Manrodt: (08:09)
Now let’s fast forward to this last September. We did 4.6 million TEUs.

Jon Waterhouse: (08:16)
Wow.

Karl Manrodt: (08:16)
In just that amount of time. So, great leadership on the side of the port for bringing in those shippers that we need, but also great infrastructure as well. If you think about it, there’s a lot of people that live in the Southeast. I know you’re going to find this hard to believe, but people are leaving Detroit and New York and they’re coming farther South. Well, when they come South, they need to go ahead and shop. That means all the goods that they used to buy in those high tax states, I didn’t really say that did I, but they all left. They’re coming down here. They need those goods and services. By default, all those goods are going to go ahead and follow as well. So great infrastructure, great location, great leadership has really led to really superior growth, and that growth is just going to continue in the years to come.

Jon Waterhouse: (09:03)
It really gives businesses a competitive advantage due to the logistics climate here in Georgia. Can you kind of explain and piggyback on that a little bit?

Karl Manrodt: (09:11)
Sure, exactly. Well, to go along with that, one that goes along with the climate side is that the port is very instrumental in getting something that has not been done in a lot of other ports. We have two what are referred to as class one railroads, Norfolk Southern and CSX, operating out of the port. We’re the only port that has literally the lines on the port property, and they’re building a longer track, which enables them to build bigger trains to go to farther cities. So where we have a train that may come up to Atlanta once a day, we’re now able to compete and serve as far away as Kansas.

Karl Manrodt: (09:50)
If you think about that freight coming in, our ability to impact a wider range of the U.S. now becomes much more feasible and much more practical and much more cost effective for merchandisers. So they can build their facilities in there, get great turnaround times at the port, great service out of the port, and then get their products obviously faster to you and I, because like you said, it’s all about you.

Jon Waterhouse: (10:18)
Let’s talk about roads and highways in Georgia. Let’s move from railroads to roads and highways. Of course, they’re also essential to business logistics, but I was checking out one of your presentations and it cites a 2013 report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers. They gave Georgia’s bridges and roads a C minus, right? And I’ve hit a couple of potholes so I know what they’re talking about, not too impressive. How are Georgia’s roads impacting logistics?

Karl Manrodt: (10:47)
Well, it’s kind of like everything else. The minute that you hit a a barrier or any construction, you’re going to go ahead and slow down, and that congestion is definitely going to go and slow down product significantly. So now I have to worry about, or if I’m on the logistic side to think through, what’s the best route to take the product? The good news is that we’re actually starting to construct and work on our roads to get them a little bit more effective and improve them. But you’re right, when you start looking at the overall, I need to frame that, you need to understand even though we’re doing really bad, so is the rest of the country. So we just can’t point to Georgia and say, “You really are terrible at it.” Overall, as a nation, we’re really bad when it comes to our transportation infrastructure right now and it really needs to be improved pretty significantly.

Jon Waterhouse: (11:34)
Got you. Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (11:59)
Stick around for more on Lenz on Business here on WSB. This week we’re talking with Dr. Karl Manrodt, a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. We got more for you after the break.

Richard Lenz: (12:17)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (12:45)
This week’s Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business is on the move, literally. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and we’re talking about the business of logistics with quite an expert. That’s Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online masters program for working professionals. You can visit makeyournextmove.org to learn more. Dr. Manrodt has done an exhaustive amount of logistics research, co-authored seven books, and has given more than 150 presentations across the globe.

Jon Waterhouse: (13:35)
Now, Karl, I noticed that four of your books are about procurement. Let’s talk about that.

Karl Manrodt: (13:41)
Well, Jon, you just opened up a can of worms.

Jon Waterhouse: (13:42)
Uh-oh.

Karl Manrodt: (13:43)
Because when you start thinking about how much transportation or logistics has changed over the last 30 years since I’ve been in the industry, you could mirror that over in procurement as well. Here’s what’s really happening. So let’s go back and level-set maybe 30, 40 years ago. Do you remember being on an airplane, and since we’re in Atlanta we have to talk about Delta, right?

Jon Waterhouse: (14:04)
Yes.

Karl Manrodt: (14:04)
So you open it up and there will be an ad about how to negotiate, right? And it’s all about when you look at that in the underlying process, it’s really about power. How do I use my power to get the best deal possible? How do I leverage that to make it work? Well, let’s think about that for a little bit. If I go into a store or anything like that and I try to use my power, and I’ll put that in quotes, to get the best deal, that supplier, that store really doesn’t like me a whole lot because I’m not really friendly about it. I just want to go ahead and beat him up and get the best price possible. Longterm, that really doesn’t develop a strong relationship that makes things work well. Millennials and a lot of us just don’t like the way that works anyway.

Karl Manrodt: (14:50)
So firms are really rethinking how they actually procure goods and services. So one of them, we got involved with this back in the Air Force about 15 years ago, looking at how Air Force and industry in the private sector actually does procurement well, how do they manage relationships? What we’re finding is that there’s different models that firms can use or employ to actually get the best benefits.

Karl Manrodt: (15:17)
So, let’s go back to our own lives because we like to talk about ourselves, so I can start thinking about a transactional relationship, right? I go to Starbucks, it’s kind of a transaction. I put in my app what I want. I don’t even have to talk to anybody, right? And they just give me the product that I want and I can walk out. But we also have places where we buy things that are much more relational in focus. If you think about our doctors, right? I kid with my students that I’ve got like six of them keeping me alive today, you know? And that all changed after I hit 50. So my relationship with them is very different. It’s a give and take. Companies are doing the same thing because they’re looking at their suppliers to say, “How can you give me the best benefit possible? How can you bring me innovation into the organization?”

Karl Manrodt: (16:04)
You know, McDonald’s is a great leader in this whole side. Do you know how many pages their contracts are with their key suppliers?

Jon Waterhouse: (16:11)
I have no idea.

Karl Manrodt: (16:12)
I’m sorry, they don’t have one. It’s zero. So think about a multi-billion dollar organization not having a contract, but a handshake and a relationship that manages that process. That’s kind of cool, and we really studied a lot of those relationships and see how those work.

Jon Waterhouse: (16:31)
We’re going to hear from more from Dr. Karl Manrodt in just a few moments. You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and just complete the form to get started. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Don’t go anyplace. We’ll be back just right after the break.

Richard Lenz: (17:04)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (17:29)
Welcome back to Lenz on Business here on WSB. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (17:54)
Now, I don’t know about you, but on this week’s Lenz on Business, I’m getting a crash course in logistics because the logistics doctor is in the house. I’m talking about Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online master’s program for working professionals. You can visit makeyournextmove.org to learn more. Dr. Manrodt has done an exhaustive amount of logistics research, co-authored seven books, and has given more than 150 presentations across the globe.

Jon Waterhouse: (18:38)
Dr. Manrodt, interesting stuff here today. I’m learning all kinds of new things about logistics. Actually, I knew very little, but I do know something that is kind of freaking me out, and that has to do with automated transportation and how that might be changing and affecting logistics. There’s a super creepy FedEx commercial where a robot comes to the door, replacing the FedEx delivery person. My daughter, she freaked when she saw it. She said, “That is weird.” So let’s talk about that, Karl. What do you think about our future as far as robots and automation and logistics?

Karl Manrodt: (19:14)
You’re going to get really freaked out.

Jon Waterhouse: (19:16)
Okay, let’s hear it.

Karl Manrodt: (19:18)
If you start looking at the reasons for automation, a lot of them deal with safety, but also one of the structural problems we have is that there’s not a lot of drivers. We have a driver shortage that we’ve experienced for probably 30 years now. Not enough people want to become a truck driver. I get it. With all the stereotypes and everything that goes with it, people don’t appreciate the professionalism that it takes to actually move our goods along the interstates safely. They always get kind of the bad apple in the bunch, and that’s what they focus in on. It’s very unfair, but that’s life.

Karl Manrodt: (19:52)
So automation can really help me reduce our costs fairly significantly. There’s technology today that all allow trucks to platoon together. So basically truck one and truck two are going to be synced, kind of like by Bluetooth, and the driver in the first truck will automatically drive the second truck as well.

Jon Waterhouse: (20:12)
My goodness.

Karl Manrodt: (20:13)
And the third or the fourth and the fifth. I’ll still have drivers in there, but I can get greater fuel efficiency by allowing them to be a little bit closer together going down the highway. So what’s driving it? It’s going to be cost. That’s going to be the number one driver.

Karl Manrodt: (20:28)
Number two driver is this whole idea about convenience. You said you want everything yesterday. How do I go ahead and do that? Let me give you a really good example about what I think is going to happen in the future. Companies like, well, let’s talk about Kroger. They have Clicklist. I don’t know if you use it. My wife uses it all the time.

Jon Waterhouse: (20:45)
We do.

Karl Manrodt: (20:45)
Matter of fact, I picked up the order yesterday and I’m standing there, and our person is putting it in the truck and I said, “My wife sure bought a lot of stuff today.” She goes, “Yeah, this is a big order for her.” They knew who she was, you know?

Karl Manrodt: (20:59)
But now if I’m Kroger, that isn’t the end point. The end point is really how do I deliver goods to your home? Why do you have to come to Kroger to pick that up? Or why don’t I have an autonomous vehicle that will pull up to your home, unload your groceries, you come out, you can go ahead and swipe a card, and a basket will open up with all your goods in it, freezer and refrigerated and dry goods. You pull your things out and then you go, “You know what? I really forgot bananas.” So you can go ahead and log in, and they can go ahead and sell you bananas as well.

Karl Manrodt: (21:34)
Why isn’t that going to happen? It will happen, right? It’s just a matter of time. Autonomous vehicles are going to hit the roads. Now it’s a big debate on how quickly it will hit the road, but it’s going to go ahead and happen. Companies that you just mentioned are exploring and finding new ways to do things.

Karl Manrodt: (21:51)
Another example, Amazon, Audi, and DHL formed a partnership in Europe. Now any ideas why they would form a partnership?

Jon Waterhouse: (22:03)
No idea.

Karl Manrodt: (22:04)
Well, you ordered something on Amazon and your big fear is, you know what, it could get stolen. So I don’t want it delivered to my house. So, buy an Audi, because then when you place your order, DHL will see that you got the order, they’ll pick it up. Instead of delivering it to your home, they’ll ping your car, find out where you’re located, drive up to your car, have a onetime code, open up your trunk, and then put the goods in your trunk and then drive away. You’ll get notified the goods are in your car, okay? So another way to use autonomy, right, and automation to be a lot more effective and efficient.

Karl Manrodt: (22:43)
Now when I shared this story to a bunch of friends who were sitting around at dinner, and they’re all kind of in our age group, and I said, “Well, what do you think?” They said, “That’s great. That’s a wonderful idea. I really love that.” Because you can see through how much time that’s going to save. What do you think the reaction was from my students?

Jon Waterhouse: (23:01)
I don’t know. What do you think?

Karl Manrodt: (23:02)
They hated it. They were like, “I don’t want to let anybody into my trunk of my car.” And I’m like, “Well, what do you have in your trunk?” That kind of scared me a little bit. So I don’t know.

Jon Waterhouse: (23:11)
Just get rid of the bodies first and everything will be okay.

Karl Manrodt: (23:15)
But look at Amazon. Now they’re going to the automated process where they can actually get into your house and then deliver the goods, not on your porch, but in inside in your hallway, right? So autonomy is moving in a direction where we haven’t figured it all out, but it’s coming.

Karl Manrodt: (23:33)
Two more examples. You talked about getting everything yesterday. How about on Amazon, there’s a great opportunity for a company that can actually design and knit a dress for our spouse in 26 minutes, okay? Now think about that. If I’m Amazon, and Amazon actually has a patent on this idea, what they’re going to do is, your wife orders a dress. She goes, “This is what I want with the type of fabric or the knit that I want.” Amazon’s going to have that on a truck and it will start driving to your home. It will knit the dress as it drives and when it gets there, it’ll be done. The driver puts it into a box or puts it into a bag and delivers it to your home. 26 minutes.

Karl Manrodt: (24:23)
So, they’re talking about not just on knitting dresses, that’s a different company in New York, but I can do that with 3D printing, right? So I’ll print your product and then have it delivered to your home. I’ll put 3D printers on my trucks and then deliver that out, okay?

Karl Manrodt: (24:39)
Again, is it that far away? I don’t know. I don’t think it’s quite as far as we think it is. I think technology is really advancing pretty rapidly that will enable those types of things to occur.

Jon Waterhouse: (24:53)
That’s George Jetson stuff, for real. I’m still waiting for the flying cars, by the way.

Karl Manrodt: (24:58)
I hope they don’t come. I’ve seen some people drive in Georgia and Tennessee and some other places, and it’s not a pretty sight.

Jon Waterhouse: (25:05)
Folks, you’re locked into Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Dr Karl Manrodt, a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business.

Jon Waterhouse: (25:39)
Dr. Manrodt, you’re an original researcher in the concept of Vested, which is also known as Vested outsourcing. That’s a specific type of hybrid business model. Can you give me an example that might be familiar to me and our listeners?

Karl Manrodt: (25:54)
Sure. We talked a little bit about McDonald’s just a minute ago, and that was probably one of the most fascinating set of case study interviews that we really did. Think about a process where a buyer and supplier work together to determine the best way to deliver a service or product to their customers and where you allow the customer or the supplier to bring innovation into your organization. Most people really don’t like that because they think, “I’ve got to invent it or I have to own everything.” So they close themselves in and not open to a lot of different things.

Karl Manrodt: (26:29)
When H.A. Lafley took over at Proctor and Gamble, he changed the culture. He said, “50% of our innovation really needs to come from external suppliers.” So how do I do that? Well, I’ve got to go ahead and create a process where a system that allows that to occur. Vested is all about that system. How do I make it effective and efficient to develop a relationship between people? So I focus on outcomes. I don’t focus in on individual tasks. What’s our outcome? We want market share, we want to introduce new products, whatever that outcome is. I want to focus on what I want to get accomplished, not how to do it.

Karl Manrodt: (27:10)
If you were to have somebody come over and say, “You know what? I want to have my house cleaned,” I don’t tell them how to clean the house, I don’t say they have to use these types of cleaners to clean the house. I just say I want the house cleaned, right? And I’m going to allow them to do the best job possible, right? So I have to focus in on the things that are really critical. The measurements that I use and put in place have to be directly aligned to those outcomes.

Karl Manrodt: (27:35)
Then the final part where two pieces is that instead of just a single price, I’m going to have a pricing model. So I’m going to go ahead and look at pricing very differently that could be variable based on our success. Then I really have to manage the relationship, and most companies don’t manage relationship. They just sign the contract and they expect it to get done. The reality is relationships just don’t work that way.

Karl Manrodt: (28:00)
It’s kind of like the joke about the old farmer. He goes home after they get married and his wife says, “You don’t tell me you love me anymore.” And he says, “Well, I still do, and when I change my mind, I’ll let you know.” Right? You can’t do that, right? So you have to manage relationships. Vested really is about developing trusting relationships that allow both firms to achieve the desired outcomes that they’re trying to get. It’s been going barnstorms as far as across Canada and especially in Europe as far as on the adoption of those techniques.

Jon Waterhouse: (28:35)
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget marketing matters, and Lenz knows marketing, from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations. Thanks smart, thank creative, think Lenz. Learn more at lenzmarketing.com.

Jon Waterhouse: (29:00)
We’ve got more for you just after the break with Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a logistics guru from Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, sharing his logistics savvy here on Lenz on Business. We got more. Stick around. Don’t go no place.

Richard Lenz: (29:22)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: (29:49)
Yes, you’re tuned into Lenz on Business here on WSB, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, warming that chair for Richard Lenz, and this week we’ve been talking with logistics expert, Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He is also the director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management program, an online masters program for working professionals. Visit makeyournextmove.org to learn more.

Jon Waterhouse: (30:30)
Now Karl, how is higher education changing these days? What are some of the current trends and issues at the forefront facing you?

Karl Manrodt: (30:39)
Well, how much time do we have? There’s a lot of issues. Probably the biggest one that we start looking at, a couple, is going to be on resources, right, having the appropriate level of resources to do the job. I think no matter what university professor you’re ever going to talk to, they’re going to say we need more, right?

Jon Waterhouse: (30:58)
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Karl Manrodt: (30:59)
We need to be a good steward of what we use as well to make sure that it’s effective for the students. So resources are always going to be a big issue. But how we deliver education is also under hundred radical change. You even talked about in the introduction. We do an online master’s program, and so now you’re starting to see more education moving towards online environments, right? I can just sit at home and get my groceries. I can sit at home and get my education, right? That’s an interesting trend and maybe not necessarily a very good one. If you think about it, if you’re 18, 19 years old, I know this is going to be hard for them to hear or listen to, they really don’t know that much. And to cater to that group is kind of scary, right? Because we’re going to say we’re going to go ahead and build our environment, our society, around an 18-year-old. I’m not disagreeing that we shouldn’t cater to them somewhat, but we also have to think about what’s best for them longterm, right?

Karl Manrodt: (32:00)
So how do I deliver content is easy. I can do that online. I can do that in person. But is that really what higher education ought to be about? Is it about content or is it about character? Am I trying to go ahead and instill in them how to live, think, and really be a productive member of society? If I think about why I got into this or why I stay in education, it’s really about developing those relationships with my students.

Karl Manrodt: (32:28)
We talked just a moment ago about sourcing and how Vested is changing how we think about relational management and how that’s changing relationships between buyers and suppliers. Kind of in the same way, I think higher ed, or at least faculty, ought to rethink why they got into this business. There’s a lot of stuff that you could do to make money. That’s not a problem. But what are you doing to change society in a positive manner? How are you investing your life back into those students that are in front of you every day? I can do that in person. I can do that by taking students out to lunch. So every single student in my class had to sit through a lunch with me. Yeah, I feel sorry for them, you know, because that’s a bad thing.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:10)
Unless you bought it.

Karl Manrodt: (33:10)
I did buy.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:11)
Good.

Karl Manrodt: (33:12)
So they probably liked it, you know? But the goal is to go ahead and you share your life with them, to get them to be better and to think not just about logistics but about their life to be more effective in what they do.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:23)
Thanks so much to Dr. Karl Manrodt of Georgia College for joining us this week. Lenz on Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future. Visit dynamicmoney.com. And make sure and check out our website for our library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com. That’s L-E-N-Z onbusiness.com.

Jon Waterhouse: (33:49)
The whole shebang was presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. You can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online. Visit makeyournextmove.org and just complete the form to get started. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse. We’ll see you next time on Lenz on Business right here on WSB.

Richard Lenz: (34:20)
Hi, this is Richard Lenz here. You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.