Jared Powell, Center for Disease Control, graduate of the online MMIS program at Georgia College

What happens when you’re in the midst of earning your masters degree in business and the on-campus program changes into an online program? This happened to Georgia College graduate Jared Powell. Powell, who earned his Master of Management Information Systems degree, talks to guest host Jon Waterhouse about the differences between on-campus and online learning, how online studies enhanced his communication skills, and how his degree prepared him for his current work in the office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control.

Transcript of Show

Speaker 1: 00:02
It’s time for Lenz On Business with Richard Lenz on News 95.5 and AM 750 WSB presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, exploring Atlanta’s business leaders, inspiring stories, lessons learned, and tips for growth and success.

Jon Waterhouse: 00:24
What happens when you’re in the midst of earning your master’s degree in business and the on campus program changes midstream into an online program? It might mean you’re in store for some educational culture shock, but it may also mean you’ll be experiencing higher learning in ways you couldn’t imagine. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse and welcome to another edition of Lenz On Business here on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. Here to tell us about his online business master’s degree experience is Jared Powell. Jared received his bachelor’s degree in Rhetoric from Georgia College and for graduate school, he returned to Georgia College and entered what would become the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business online program. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree, and today he works in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Welcome, Jared. How you doing?

Jared Powell: 01:30
I’m doing well. How are you doing, Jon?

Jon Waterhouse: 01:31
Doing great. Now this is of course a business show, and we’re going to talk about your business master’s degree experience in just a bit, which actually you got through Georgia College, but you also went to Georgia College for undergrad. Why Georgia College?

Jared Powell: 01:47
Well, Milledgeville is my hometown. They call it being a local or a mocal in Milledgeville, and I honestly loved the campus. It was beautiful there. I knew a lot of people that worked there and it just had that smaller setting that I liked, and just had a great opportunity to interact with professors and learn a lot through those interactions. So I figured, you know what, I’ll stick around here.

Jon Waterhouse: 02:15
And you got your undergrad at Georgia College. What sort of need did you feel to go back to school to get your masters?

Jared Powell: 02:23
After having a little bit of struggle looking for … or in the, I guess the major workforce after graduating from undergrad, I decided that I needed to expand my skill set some more, other than just having a Rhetoric degree, which most people don’t know what that is. So, I-

Jon Waterhouse: 02:39
What is a Rhetoric degree?

Jared Powell: 02:40
So Rhetoric is speech writing, communication, primarily those, and people who get that major for undergrad end up going towards law, theology. So it … For me, it really didn’t work out that way, and that was fine, and it ended up being a good compliment to my master’s degree, which we’re going to get into it.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:01
And again, why did you want your master’s degree? I know you have a tech mind.

Jared Powell: 03:06
Right, I do. I’ve always been into technology, whether it be through early on video production in my undergrad, and then even earlier than that in high school and middle school. I’ve always had just a passion for learning new things, playing with new technology. And so I figured, “Hey, why don’t I make a career out of that?”.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:24
And you chose the concentration of master in Management Information Systems. Now
Jared, I have to be honest, I have a general idea of what that means. Technology, programming, and how businesses use information to improve the company’s operations, but can you explain the full scope of that field of study?

Jared Powell: 03:44
Well, yeah, I can do the best that I can. It’s hilarious to me because management, or Masters of Management Information Systems is such a mouthful anyways, so trying to get it out is crazy to me, but it’s such a large scope. I mean, primarily from what my hands on with it was, was learning the basics to learning organizational communication, learning about SQL, which is Structured Query Language, learning about enterprise management systems, which I mean, that’s a big portion of what MMIS is, is learning how to use those skills in an organizational setting and that’s what they give us the tools to do.

Jon Waterhouse: 04:24
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online, and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org, and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re talking with Jared Powell, an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now
Jared, so you start earning your Master’s in Business at Georgia College and they’re in the middle of the program, it switches from classroom study to an online program. Let’s talk about that transition of going from face-to-face to online learning. Was that jarring at all?

Jared Powell: 05:21
For me it was a little different, because I felt like I learned better in a classroom setting, and just having that interaction, the physical interaction, which I think a lot of people would agree with. But it was interesting to transition because we had a couple of classes that would meet one week face-to-face, and then one week online. So it was kind of testing the waters, and I got used to it, because we had to post in forums, that sort of thing, to really communicate with the class. But once we went fully online, it was just like jumping in the deep end and you just kind of had to run with it. But it was fun, because it was something totally new. We got to play with all kinds of newer technology for like labs, and that sort of thing, to really get interactive in the classroom.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:01
Can you talk about some ways that you adapted to that new format of online learning?

Jared Powell: 06:05
Oh sure. I feel like I’m better at vocalizing myself face-to-face, or just like having a conversation with someone, and I really had to, I guess, teach myself how to take that and type it into a small blank and really explain concepts, or things that we were talking about in the classroom, and then have to comment on other people’s thoughts and posts in our online discussion panels. So that was unique, because for me, I’m like, “Okay, I only have like one or two things to say if I type it, but if I’m talking, I could talk all day.”.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:40
And do you think that made you a stronger communicator?

Jared Powell: 06:43
I believe so. I think it helped me to be more direct and to just also be able to, I guess, give constructive criticism to my classmates and not be, I guess, too direct.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:58
So you were talking a little bit about the differences between online and classroom learning. Can you kind of expand on that a little bit? Any other differences that you noticed?

Jared Powell: 07:09
Well, we just had to learn how to be in an online classroom where we would meet in … I believe it was WebEx was the program we used, and that’s like an online classroom where you can come in and you can see the video and audio feed from your professor. So you actually get to see them. It’s not like you’re just staring into the void and listening to someone ramble on, but you … so that was interesting, because you’d see your classmates. Sometimes somebody wouldn’t mute the mic, and they might be eating a little dinner or something, so that. Those were like … some of the growing pains we had to learn through in the process. But other than that it was, it was pretty fun and a pretty smooth transition. I don’t know if any other of my classmates had any issues. I’d never really heard anybody complain about it, so …

Jon Waterhouse: 07:51
So what are some of the biggest misconceptions of online learning, maybe some that you had that were dispelled once you started experiencing it?

Jared Powell: 07:59
I think some of the main ones are, “Well if it’s online, I’m going to be isolated,” or, “If it’s online, I’m going to not really be able to have a relationship with my professor, and really get to know this person” and I don’t think that was necessarily true. And in my case, and in the case of my fellow students in the program, we had plenty of opportunities to talk to our professors and to … he invited … he and she invited us to meet with them in their office if we wanted to come to campus to meet up with them, which lucky for me, I worked on campus, so I could just go right upstairs. But, they had an open door policy, even in the online space. They say, “Any time you want to call, anytime you want to come by,” they were willing to do that.

And that really made it special, because I liked that aspect about Georgia College in my undergrad and it felt like it just carried right on over into the Master’s program of open door policy, please come by and chat. And I think also having relationship with students of being able to connect with your peers to study, to grow, and to learn, and maybe even collaborate on projects together. We were required to do that. We had many a project where we would have to do those sort of things. So, they almost reinforced it a little bit to … so you don’t feel so isolated, and it’s not just a solo gig.

Jon Waterhouse: 09:15
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Jared Powell an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now Jared, you were talking about communicating with fellow students and that comradery. In what ways there in the online program were you able to communicate, outside of just traditional email? What ways did you all get creative as far as collaborating during studies?

Jared Powell: 09:52
Well, we definitely had to use Skype sessions, or also use WebEx sessions. They opened up lobbies for us, so we could have those interactions with students if we wanted to enter a space like that.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:04
What are lobbies?

Jared Powell: 10:05
A lobby is just essentially a room online where you can log in and basically use the same setting that you would use for the classroom, but use it for collaborating with students, and the professor may or may not be there. We also had breakout sessions in the classroom too where the professor would open up multiple lobbies and we’d be able to chat together, the same way you would chat pretty much via like Skype or a video conferencing, maybe FaceTime, whatever you’re familiar with. And we had to use that a good many times, because some of our classmates weren’t in the same city as us or maybe not even in the same state. So that was pretty interesting to kind of experience that and have to work around not being able to meet up face-to-face all the time with our fellow classmates.

Jon Waterhouse: 10:48
So you never ever really felt you were on an island?

Jared Powell: 10:50
I never did, no. I mean I’m a pretty social butterfly, but I know a lot of my classmates are … there’s a few in there that were maybe a little bit more introverted, and even then we had … I would just engage with them and make sure like, “Hey, we’re here,” and I think that would be the encouragement I would say to anyone out there who’s maybe hesitant about getting into the master’s program, or online program, just give it a shot and put yourself out there to really interact with your fellow students.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:17
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business right here on WSB. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs, including the MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. You can learn more at gcsu.edu/business, and we’re going to be learning more about the program from one of the program’s graduates,
Jared Powell an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program at Georgia College. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse. You’re locked into Lenz On Business on WSB. We’ll be back with more in just a few moments. (singing).

Richard Lenz: 12:08
Hi, this is Richard Lens, and you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 12:35
If you want business talk, we’ve got it here on Lenz On Business, on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m guest host Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re chatting with Jared Powell. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree online from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, and today he works in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Now Jared, let’s talk about time management, when it comes to online studies and how did you use time management to your advantage during your experience studying online at Georgia College?

Jared Powell: 13:17
Okay, well I was a part-time employee for the school, but I also did a lot in the afternoons, so time management was crucial, trying to figure out … I was very busy in my master’s program, but really I would have to schedule time with my friends that were in the program with me to meet up in the … like I said earlier, in those online sessions, and really just have to team up together and find the time to work on some of these projects, because honestly some of the stuff was a little difficult coming into it, not really knowing how to do certain aspects of the class. These guys that were in the program with me came into it from the undergrad, and they had already done this.

Jon Waterhouse: 14:02
You had a bit of a flexible schedule, but you also had like two part time jobs.

Jared Powell: 14:06
Yeah, my schedule was pretty flexible, but the two part time jobs really kind of made that time limited. So trying to figure out the time of the afternoon or the evenings to really go into the program and start to maybe do the online sessions, to meet up with classmates, or to comment on other people’s posts in our online environment, that was tough, because sometimes it would feel like, “Okay, if I don’t get this done tonight, it’s going to be overwhelming tomorrow,” you know? So that was a little tough to navigate at first, but once I got the hang of it, it started to become a little bit easier, and I had a little method to the madness.

Jon Waterhouse: 14:46
So if someone were to say to you that they wouldn’t have time to tackle an online degree, what would you say? Is it for everyone?

Jared Powell: 14:53
I would say it’s for everyone. If you can build a schedule for yourself and just say, “All right, I’m going to do this much tonight, and I’ll do this much tomorrow, and then go off of that,” I think you can start having the building blocks to really have good time management. I mean, I’m having to learn that right now with my little puppy of having that schedule again, you know? So I think, really you can do anything you set your mind to, and this program isn’t overwhelmingly difficult to … I mean, I understand that people that are coming into this are full time employees, maybe parents, maybe someone who is very busy, but they make it doable is what I’m trying to say.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:32
Does it take a great deal of discipline?

Jared Powell: 15:34
I would say, yeah. Learning takes a great deal of discipline in any environment. So I think if you can really set your mind to it, and really put yourself to the test and say, “You know what? I’m going to do this,” and be determined, I think you can really achieve it.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:49
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started, I’m guest host
Jon Waterhouse. This week we’re chatting with Jared Powell, an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. He’s giving us a behind the scenes look at what it’s like to study business online, and we’ll be back for more after news, weather and traffic here on WSB.

Richard Lenz: 16:41
Hi, this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business. (singing).

Jon Waterhouse: 17:07
Welcome back to Lenz On Business here on WSB. I’m your guest host, Jon Waterhouse, Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top ranked online graduate business programs including the MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. And this week we’re chatting with
Jared Powell. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree online from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, and today he’s putting it to use by working in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Now
Jared, we were talking about your experience, your online learning experience at Georgia College. Let’s talk about some of the projects you experienced during your Master in Management Information Systems program. What sort of real world scenarios did they drop you all into?

Jared Powell: 18:10
So they dropped us into a couple of cool ones. Primarily one I’m thinking of in particular, was a class where we had to build an app around local business, or something that could be used for everyday use. Ours was for a local business that was a fabric company for quilts, and it was based out of Milledgeville. So, It was to help them in the order process to show off any of their product. And so, we built this app together as a team, and we had to go through this whole, I guess, project management side of things together, which gave us a cool piece of that puzzle of Management Information Systems. And it was interesting. I mean, I never had to build an app before, and really tag teaming with … I think we had about five or six people on our team, and really kind of learning how to use the software to build the application, and to also make sure it wasn’t terrible. It was a pretty fun process. I mean, it’s really cool to see really what’s behind that, that building process.

Jon Waterhouse: 19:12
And everyone on the team had a different responsibility?

Jared Powell: 19:15
Oh yeah, everyone on the team had a different responsibility. We used this tool called Scrum, and it’s a newer project management tool that is pretty popular right now, and we got to use that tool and also apply it to the application building process. So it was pretty interesting to take what we were learning from that, and also learn how to build an application together. So we’re kind of doing a tag team of learning together.

Jon Waterhouse: 19:42
So that was a great example of how you collaborated with other students. I understand online learning often attracts a diverse group of students. You were, I believe 25, 26 when you were studying. What about the rest of your classmates? What sort of melting pot did you have there?

Jared Powell: 19:58
Oh man. We had all kinds of people come into the program. We had older folks, who are maybe parents, who have been in the industry for a long time, but are looking to maybe advance themselves a little bit more. We had people who were pregnant. We had people who were international students. We … I mean you name it, we had it. It was amazing, I … and it honestly prepared me when I came to the CDC, because the CDC is so diverse, and there’s people from all kinds of backgrounds there, and I didn’t realize that when I came into … and not … it was awesome just to be like, “Okay, cool. This is just like my Master’s program.”

Jon Waterhouse: 20:40
And what did you learn from some of the older students in the program? What sort of perspectives did they share with you that kind of enlightened you in the field?

Jared Powell: 20:48
It was interesting, because they brought in experiences from their workplace and just showed us like real world examples in the classroom, something that we may not necessarily get in a undergrad degree. In a Master’s program, you get people who come in and say, “Well, this is how we did it in our office, but I see how we can do it differently, and how we can bring change into a work environment.” And it was cool to see them apply the things that we were learning in the classroom, and then come back and say, “This worked. This didn’t work.” So to see the real world application of it was something I don’t think I would get anywhere else.

Jon Waterhouse: 21:24
And to hear these real world experiences from folks who are out there in the field, did that help reinforce you that, hey, I made the right choice to study this field?

Jared Powell: 21:34
Oh, absolutely. I think that just really drove it home for me, because I’m like, “Okay, these people are working in the industry and really seen change from the things that they’re learning,” so it was awesome.

Jon Waterhouse: 21:48
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business right here on WSB. It’s presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university, and don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org and simply complete the form to get started. I’m guest host,
Jon Waterhouse. This week, we’re talking with Jared Powell. He’s actually an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now Jared, off the air, you explained to me that the program didn’t end when it was over. Can you kind of elaborate on that?

Jared Powell: 22:35
It was awesome to have that experience, like I said earlier about really having that open door policy, and it wasn’t closed after we graduated. Dr. Getty, who is my advisor for the program, she’s also the head of the department for that Master’s in Management Information Systems, and she really helped refine my resume and help kind of guide me into, “Hey, maybe you should apply to jobs here. Maybe you should look here,” because at the time I was unemployed after I graduated. And so, she was really great about trying to help me figure out where I wanted to go next, like, “What was the next step? Where do you want to go, and what do you want to do with this degree?” I didn’t know. And so, she really helped narrow that down for me. It was really special.

Jon Waterhouse: 23:23
And what about other students? Have you kept in contact with some of the classmates from the program, and have they given you any additional advice along the way now that you’re at the CDC?

Jared Powell: 23:32
I would say, yeah. I’ve kept up with them, we’ve touched base, but really I’ve seen their careers kind of take off, and they’re going in crazy directions, and it’s interesting just to see the guys who were the same age as me that were going through the program, end up getting married, and having families together, and really just going off into this field that is so huge, and continuously growing. I wouldn’t … I don’t know if they necessarily have given me any feedback, but it’s just cool to … for me as a student and a graduate from this program to see it take off and go into some impressive directions.

Jon Waterhouse: 24:12
And you, yourself, moved into an impressive direction. You have a job in the Chief Information Security Office of the CDC. Can you talk about some of the practical applications that you’ve been able to use your degree in your job at the CDC?

Jared Powell: 24:26
Absolutely. I would say that a lot of what I’ve learned from this program and brought into the CDC was organizational communication, really learning what it takes to chat one-on-one with people who have a larger skill set than me, or people who know more than me, or people who are higher up in the organizational chain. And really just because we had so much software and technology coming at us, we had to be quick to learn what, what was being thrown at us in the program, and going into the CDC, some of the tools I had not necessarily seen before. So it was cool to say, “You know what? I learned this so quickly in this program. I got this.” It equipped me to be able to tackle some of the challenges that I experienced when I came in, and I felt like I have only been better for it because of this program.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:22
So in Management Information Systems, you’ve got to be able to stay on top of the latest tech?

Jared Powell: 25:27
Absolutely, absolutely.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:28
In what ways do you do that?

Jared Powell: 25:30
Really, staying up to date with what’s going on in the news, I feel like I have to constantly check out what’s going … like, what’s coming out, what … maybe what Google is doing, what is the latest software security out there? And firewalls, it just depends on … I mean, because it goes in so many different directions, but staying on top of it, staying up to date with the latest updates and patches that come from Microsoft, it’s crazy, man. It is insane.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:58
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business here on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And we’re talking with
Jared Powell. He’s an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. Now I understand
Jared, that you work in the Chief Information Security Officer Office at the CDC. What can you tell us about your job? It obviously is in securities.

Jared Powell: 26:31
So my job is interesting. I primarily work with end user support, so people who are using their machines day to day, but I do a lot of things. I wear a lot of hats, so I’m constantly having to shift gears. I do a lot of patch management, which means I help maintain security within the office, and make sure everybody’s stuff is up to date, and that there’s no vulnerabilities on these machines. I build a lot of servers. I’ve built … I mean, you name it, I do it, it’s a lot. I feel like I’m constantly just taking a hat off and putting a new one on.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:10
So that’s got to be some pressure. I mean, what kind of personality does it take to succeed in the management information systems field?

Jared Powell: 27:17
I feel like you could have really any personality. But really, if you can just have a good attitude about it, because sometimes it can be difficult and sometimes it can be hard, and you can see that weight on some other people. But I think, if you can be the light in the office, or be the person who’s trying to be a little bit more peppy like me, it really lightens that load a little bit.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:40
And what do you enjoy most about your job?

Jared Powell: 27:42
Honestly, I enjoy the interaction with other people. I’m a big people person, but I enjoy that in tandem with getting to play with new technology every day, that is so fun to me.

Jon Waterhouse: 27:54
What’s your most exciting new tech that you’re working with right now?

Jared Powell: 27:56
Right now we’re primarily working with Splunk and that is a way to look through logs and query through logs to find all kinds of information, it is massive.

Jon Waterhouse: 28:08
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz On Business on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. And don’t forget marketing matters and Lenz knows marketing from brand strategy to advertising, digital marketing to public relations, think smart, think creative, think Lenz. Learn more at lenzmarketing.com. We’ll be back with more. We’re talking to Jared Powell, an online graduate of the Masters of Management Information Systems program, from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. It’s all happening right here on Lenz on Business, on WSB. (singing).

Richard Lenz: 28:55
Hi this is Richard Lenz and you’re listening to Lenz On Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business. (singing).

Jon Waterhouse: 29:12
You’re listening to Lenz On Business, right here on WSB, presented by the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university. I’m guest host, Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’ve been talking with Jared Powell. He received his Master of Management Information Systems degree online from the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. And today he’s putting it to use in the Office of the Chief Information Security Officer at the Center for Disease Control. Now
Jared, looking back on the program, how has it changed your career, and was it worth it?

Jared Powell: 29:59
I can say this, Jon, I don’t think I would have this career without this program. I don’t think I would be at the CDC without it. It gave me the tools to be, I guess … to compete against others in the application process, but it also gave me the tools to really stick with it in the program and learn even more so on the job, and gave me a desire to learn more. In undergrad, I was just kind of making it through and just, “I’m making it.” I’m wanted to make the grade just so I could graduate, but when I went back for my master’s degree, I really had a desire to learn, and that was nurtured not only there but onward into my career.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:36
And did you feel that next level push by studying?

Jared Powell: 30:40
Oh yeah, absolutely. I definitely felt that next level push to learn more, and to acquire more knowledge, because there’s so much out there. And I mean, this program really did give me the tools to succeed in the career that I have today.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:56
And so if someone who is interested in management information systems came to you and said, “Hey, what should I do?” Would you be … would you endorse this program as something to do?

Jared Powell: 31:03
Oh, absolutely. I would definitely do that. I’ve actually had people do that, and I have recommended it highly. People that I went to high school with, who started the program right when I did and they were a little unsure, I was … I told them, “This program is great. It’s maybe difficult at first, and it feels weird. There’s that learning curve of being online, but once you just let yourself get past it, let yourself be uncomfortable, push through, it’s great, and it’s worth the whole process. So just go with it.”

Jon Waterhouse: 31:32
So did they come back to you and thank you, or did they say, “Hey, what were you thinking?”.

Jared Powell: 31:37
I would say they came back and thanked me, and maybe there was a little bit of animosity there, but I think that they were really appreciative because I saw them ended up graduating, I want to say it was last year, and it was just cool to be like, “Hey, you know what? Like, we talked about this, and you actually finished the program.” So it was cool to see maybe a little bit of my … hopefully maybe my advice, but go into play and he graduated, and I think he’s doing great now, so …

Jon Waterhouse: 32:03
Awesome. Well folks, we’ve been talking with Jared Powell, a graduate of the Master of Management Information Systems program at J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College. He did it online and so can you. Thank you so much,
Jared, for joining me today. And Lenz On Business is brought to you by Chris Burns and Dynamic Money Financial Planning. Let Chris and his team help build your financial future, visit dynamicmoney.com. And the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s public liberal arts university, is our presenting sponsor. Don’t forget, you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online, and waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org, and simply complete the form they get started. And make sure and check out our website for our library of past shows at lenzonbusiness.com that’s lenzonbusiness.com. This is Jon Waterhouse, and we will see you next week, right here on WSB with more Lenz On Business, (singing).

Richard Lenz: 33:20
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz On Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business. Again, that’s gcsu.edu/business.