Dr. Karl Manrodt, Professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, and Jeremiah Griffin, Senior Manager for Process Improvement and Supply Chain for Walmart

As consumers, we live in an on-demand culture. And in the age of COVID-19, businesses are feeling this pressure now more than ever. This means the world of logistics and supply chain just got tougher. Dr. Manrodt, an expert in the field, and Griffin, who sees the subject firsthand through Walmart, share their perspectives on logistics and supply chain amid the current pandemic.

Transcript of Show

Jon Waterhouse: 00:24
Yes, it’s time to talk business on 95.5 WSB Atlanta’s News and Talk. I’m producer Jon Waterhouse. Today’s customers want our products yesterday. And thanks to Amazon Prime, UPS, FedEx, and others, we’re quite spoiled. And now in the age of COVID-19, businesses are feeling this pressure more than ever. This means the world of logistics and supply chain just got tougher. And here to talk about that in a whole lot more is Dr. Dr. Karl Manrodt. He’s a Professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the Director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management Program, an online Masters Program for working professionals. Dr. Manrodt has more than 25 years in logistics, transportation, and supply chain research. And with him today is one of his students, Jeremiah Griffin.

Jon Waterhouse: 01:24
Now Jeremiah knows supply chain from the inside out as Senior Manager for Process Improvement and Supply Chain for Walmart, of course one of the largest retailers in the country. Jeremiah is currently a student at Georgia College studying online for his Masters of Logistics and Supply Chain Management. You can learn more about Georgia Colleges Online Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management Program at makeyournextmove.org. Good afternoon, gentlemen, how is everybody doing?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 01:56
We’re doing great. How about you, Jeremiah?

Jeremiah Griffin: 01:56
Great. Happy to be here.

Jon Waterhouse: 01:58
Well, it’s great to have you two on the show. We’re practicing social distancing. We’re doing this over the interwebs, thank goodness for technology. So before we get started, Dr. Manrodt, for the uninitiated, could you give us your go to definition of logistics and supply chain?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 02:15
Well, you know what, Jon, I think if you were to turn on any news media outlet, they talk a lot about what a supply chain is. And suddenly I think we’ve been inundated with what it is, but maybe not necessarily a definition. So we need to break it down just a little bit, and I’ll keep it very non-academic. But if you think about how we get goods from anywhere in the world to the US, or from a point of origin to a destination, that’s really about logistics. So now we’re on the radio, but fortunately on my desk is a Diet Coke. So thank God Coca-Cola made it in one of their facilities, they had to transport it to get it to a store, that’s a supply chain. If you think about all the things that had to go into it: making the can, printing the can, filling it up with that nectar of the gods, and then shipping it out to us. Then logistics is a little bit more narrow, it’s just what an organization inside themselves, what they work on to get their product from their facility to the customer.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 03:13
So it’s more of a two parties working together, where supply chain is much broader, three or four organizations or more, in many cases many more than that, trying to get products to the customers efficiently and effectively. When you add in the complexities of coronavirus on top of that, that efficiency and effectiveness really starts to get stretched pretty dramatically. And that’s what makes our lives right now really interesting. I didn’t say fun, I just said interesting.

Jon Waterhouse: 03:45
I want to talk a little bit about how COVID-19 is having an impact on logistics. I can only imagine it’s having that impact every step of the way, and as an expert how have you seen the industry change in the past month or so?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 03:59
It’s an interesting question, and you know what? I think I’d really love to get , Jeremiah’s take on this as well. If you think about organizations today, and let’s go pre coronavirus, what was the expectation? I walk into a store, I’m going to have product available onsite that I can pick up, and take home. What ripples that, or really impacts it pretty dramatically is whether there’s any huge fluctuations in demand that have not been seen or foreseen. So you’ll hear on the news people will talk about a black-swan event, and that basically is something that we never thought about, it’s the unknown unknown that just suddenly appears, and we didn’t really plan for it. Coronavirus in some ways is kind of like that black swan, and what has that done? It’s now made people who are normally rational act in an irrational manner.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 04:52
The virus hits, what do we need? Toilet paper, right? Suddenly everybody goes out there decides they need to go ahead and buy toilet paper. A store like Walmart can do a great job of supplying toilet paper to the facilities, and then to the stores. The issue is that that demand has been so high that pushing that through along with everything else gets to be really, really challenging, and very difficult because their trucks are already set up, they’d say, “I’m delivering toilet paper. I’m going to deliver detergent. I’m going to deliver milk,” and everything else, right? Now suddenly I’ve got to have that additional capacity that goes in there that says, “I need a lot of other stuff that I didn’t have before.”

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 05:33
Now the good news is we’re not going to run out of toilet paper, so if everybody can kind of stop that for a while we’re going to be in really good shape. But we just need to go ahead, and be a little bit more rational in our decisions in how we’re going to go ahead, and look at things that we’re going to go ahead and buy.

Jon Waterhouse: 05:47
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s Public Liberal Arts University. And don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org, and simply complete the form to get started.

Jon Waterhouse: 06:09
Dr. Manrodt, you were talking about how COVID-19 is having an impact on logistics and supply chain these days. What businesses are really knocking it out of the park, and reacting in an impressive way?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 06:25
You know, I’d have to laud our grocery chains. I know that may sound odd a little bit, but they are providing the goods that we need on our … in the stores in a very timely manner. Now, I don’t think it’s probably very efficient, only because we put all that demand on them, and again in some cases it’s an irrational demand. We don’t need 87 rolls of toilet paper to be stockpiled in an apartment. But they’ve done a good job?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 06:55
But think about what that takes, and I think people are getting more aware of that than they have before. Somebody had to order that to put it into the distribution center, from the distribution center it had to be unloaded, put on into the slots, picked by another forklift driver, put into a truck. Somebody had to drive that truck, that truck driver stopped along the way to get a meal. Somebody had to be there to serve that truck driver. That truck had to pull up to the store, it had to be unloaded, and all those people involved had been so unseen by the general public, that suddenly they look around, and they’re aware of those drivers and everybody else that’s involved with it. So when they say, “Who’s done a good job?” I hate to just point out one, because in a supply chain there’s a lot of people that are involved with that. And if one part fails then the whole thing fails.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 07:53
So I just can’t say, again, I love our grocery stores, and if you saw my weight going up over the virus you’d understand that. But you have to think about all the other people that make that a possibility, that are the unsung heroes that are going out there, and working every day. I mean, I’m kind of blessed in a lot of ways, in that I get to work from home now. There’s a lot of people that can’t go to work, but I can do some of my work, or a lot of my work based on the internet, thank God to the technology you were talking about earlier today.

Jon Waterhouse: 08:27
Absolutely. So, Dr. Manrodt, what sort of long-lasting effects do you think the pandemic will have on logistics and supply chain?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 08:35
That’s a really great question, it’s actually one I thought a little bit about. And I’m going to give you the academic answer, Jon. It depends, and here’s what it depends on, how severe is it going to be? So if it is like now, and we get out of it at no great cost, and I’m not trying to discount in any way, shape, or form the people who are going through some very hard times, and the citizens we’re going to lose over the next couple of weeks, but if it isn’t, if it’s what they’re projecting now, we’ll go back to normal pretty quick. And the reason is we have no memory as a society. We are driven by price more than anything else, and because we’re a price-driven consumers we are paying that price now. We’re paying that price because we have allowed our supply chains to be so stretched so long, and all we’ve worried about is what’s our price going to be for that product. We haven’t thought about the consequences of viruses, or things like that on our system.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 09:47
Now what happens if it’s a lot worse? Again, let’s hope and pray that isn’t the case, but what that will do is that will start us to think about our memory a little bit, about how do we change things. I think some organizations are in that process of saying, “It’s really kind of silly to have 90% of our pharmaceuticals being made overseas.” Probably not a good idea, but if the consequence to that is, “What do I have to do if I’m going to move out of those environments where I make that product and put it someplace else?” Are we as consumers willing to go ahead and pay for that? When you start talking about risk mitigation and risk management, this isn’t just a me kind of decision, and we’ve tried it, we’ve really thought about it as a me-decision, because I can go and look at these different drugs or whatever I need to buy, and I’ll buy the lowest cost. That’s a me-decision.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 10:43
A we-decision as a nation we have to say, “Yes, but what’s the cost of that long-term for our nation? How do we think about it differently than we did before?” Maybe it’s not just I think about what I’m going to get out of it, but I need to think about it more about our nation and the impact. So long-term, it all depends on the impact, and are we going to go ahead and have that fortitude to rethink how we actually do it? Supply chains, they’re going to be efficient and effective, they’ll do exactly what we say. People like Jeremiah that are amazing and really great at their job are going to make sure we execute accordingly, but we’re going to execute according to what the strategy is. If the strategy says we’re going to offshore a lot of stuff, we’re going to offshore a lot of stuff. The country has to make that decision. We as consumers need to make that decision, and we’ll have to make it on a daily basis about what we’re going to be willing to buy and what price we’re willing to pay.

Jon Waterhouse: 11:42
Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business. I am producer Jon Waterhouse, Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. We’ll be back with more Lenz on Business, and Dr. Dr. Karl Manrodt, and Jeremiah Griffin in just a few moments.

Richard Lenz: 12:15
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business, again that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 12:42
We’re back at you with more business talk here on Lenz on Business, presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. I’m producer Jon Waterhouse, and this week we’re talking with Dr. Dr. Karl Manrodt, he’s a Professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the Director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management Program, an online Masters program for working professionals, and with him today is one of his students, Jeremiah Griffin.

Jon Waterhouse: 13:16
Now Jeremiah knows the supply chain business from the inside out as Senior Manager for Process Improvement and Supply Chain for Walmart, and Jeremiah is currently studying his Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management at Georgia College via its online program. You can learn more about that program at makeyournextmove.org. Now Jeremiah, let’s talk a little bit about some ways that you’ve adapted to the COVID-19 climate as Senior Manager for Process Improvement and Supply Chain at Walmart.

Jeremiah Griffin: 13:49
Yeah, Jon, this event that we’re experiencing across the world has been interesting to say the least at Walmart’s supply chain. We’ve done a lot to adapt. There are things Dr. Manrodt talked about in the first segment that there are some decisions being made right now that maybe aren’t as focused on the actual efficiency, or expense piece of it, but it’s just how do we move product as fast as we can at the volume that’s needed to, to make sure that we’re supplying the country with the things that they need right now. So we’ve done a lot of adjustments to our replenishment system. I would venture to say that we’ve gone old school in some cases, and really we’re having daily, almost hourly, calls on status updates, and where the opportunity lies within the supply chain.

Jeremiah Griffin: 14:45
If you think about Dr. Manrodt’s explanation of logistics versus supply chain, we’re really recognizing it even more so in an event like this that it’s truly a supply chain, all the way from the supplier, and then quite frankly ’til it gets to that customer’s shopping cart, and out the front door into their car. So all of those segments of the supply chain are having to work together very closely. We’ve seen teamwork like never before during this situation.

Jon Waterhouse: 15:19
Jeremiah, you’re in the midst of your Masters of Logistics and Supply Chain Management with Georgia College, can you talk about some ways that your current studies have prepared you for some of the challenges that you’re facing today?

Jeremiah Griffin: 15:32
Yeah, so interestingly enough, Jon, I’m in my first year, second semester, and this semester we’re actually the two courses that we’re taking are around procurement and buying, and then the second class is distribution, and so clearly a very timely course of study through this event. We are learning things about inventory holding costs, inventory costs in general, but what I really wanted to talk about is the concept that I’ve been able to actually use in Walmart, and talk about is, is the bullwhip effect. Dr. Manrodt talked about it briefly in the first segment, but what we’re seeing is this irrational buying, which then as it moves up the chain, up the supply chain, you start seeing people react to that in orders from our company to suppliers are getting bigger. The supplier is not … has dipped into their safety stock levels and is basically producing as fast as we can ship it.

Jon Waterhouse: 16:34
That’s an amazing information, Jeremiah, and after the break I want to learn more about this bullwhip effect. Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s Public Liberal Arts University. You can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org. I’m producer Jon Waterhouse, we’ll be back with more Lenz on Business on WSB.

Richard Lenz: 17:07
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business, again that’s gcsu.edu/business.

Jon Waterhouse: 17:35
Welcome back to Lenz on Business, I’m producer Jon Waterhouse. Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business offers top-ranked online graduate business programs including MBA, Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management, and Master of Management Information Systems. Learn more at gcsu.edu/business. And joining me this week is Dr. Dr. Karl Manrodt, he’s a professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the Director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management Program, an online masters program for working professionals. Dr. Manrodt has more than 25 years in logistics, transportation, and supply chain research, and joining him today is one of his students, Jeremiah Griffin.

Jon Waterhouse: 18:31
Now Jeremiah, he knows supply chain from the inside out as Senior Manager for Process Improvement and Supply Chain for Walmart, one of the largest retailers in the nation as we all know. Jeremiah is actually in the midst of his Masters of Logistics and Supply Chain Management degree, and you could learn more about Georgia College’s online program, visit makeyournextmove.org.

Jon Waterhouse: 18:57
Now before the break, gentlemen, we were talking about the bullwhip effect. If one of you could please kind of give us a bit of a primer, kind of remind us what that’s all about, and what you’re seeing in the current COVID-19 outbreak, how that’s really happening and manifesting.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 19:15
Well, let me do the easy part. I’ll do the definition, and then Jeremiah can talk about how they’re actually responding to it, which is the hard part. So the easy definition, if you think about a bullwhip, if the bullwhip is in your hand, your hand doesn’t move very much, but the tip of the whip moves an incredible amount. So, let’s go back to Jeremiah’s water for just a minute, right? So we order a little bit of water at Walmart, and that moves a little bit, right? Maybe a couple inches, but then I think about, “Well, there’s the manufacturer.” Well, those demand ups and downs, those peaks and valleys are accentuated the farther away you move from your hand to the very end.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 19:56
So what’s accentuated? Well, in water it’s kind of a simple thing because you just got the packaging, and stuff like that, but take something like making a soup for instance, right? Think of all the ingredients that go into a soup, and then trying to figure out how much I need if suddenly I go from a hundred cases a day to 300 cases a day, and that amplifies all the way across the entire supply chain, back down to the folks that are making the noodles or canning the corn, and things like that. So it gets to be very complicated, and very hard to go ahead and manage that because you don’t know what the true signal is, but your still trying to respond to it. So I’ll flip over to Jeremiah to talk about how they actually handle that.

Jeremiah Griffin: 20:39
Yeah, so what’s interesting, Jon, is as you consider the bullwhip effect in the irrational buying that we’ve experienced lately has had on it. You really have to throw out all of your forecasting, and your replenishment methods, and just look at how we can get the most product to the stores at one time, with little regard to actual inventory levels in the stores. Because at this point we don’t know what the top end is when it comes to the sales. We have gone from, in many cases from shipping cases of products to shipping entire pallets of product. So for example in … I’ll just give you an example from one facility, we might send out on a daily basis maybe 200 pallets of single product, and then the rest of the load is case picked. We are sending out an average of about 1,500 pallets now in addition to the case picks. So we are now reacting to that irrational buying, and shipping more products to the stores to account for the unforecasted demand that we’re experiencing.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 21:59
I have great news for Jeremiah. Here is the deal, what’s happening is everybody is buying so much, at some point when this is all over they’re going to look and they have to say, “Dang, I don’t have to go to the store for a while,” and that’s going to cause another problem, right? Because now suddenly the bullwhip is going to go in the exact opposite way, in that nobody’s buying, right? Nobody needs toilet paper for the next three months, what do I do?

Jon Waterhouse: 22:23
Fascinating, fascinating stuff. Folks, you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s Public Liberal Arts University. Don’t forget you can get your MBA, Master of Logistics or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org, and simply complete the form to get started. I’m producer Jon Waterhouse, this week we’re talking with Dr. Dr. Karl Manrodt, and his student Jeremiah Griffin. Dr. Manrodt, of course, an instructor, part of the J. Whitney Bunting College of Business at Georgia College, Georgia’s Public Liberal Arts University. Dr. Manrodt is the Director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management Program, and Dr. Manrodt, off-the-air we were talking about two terms that often get confused, offshoring and outsourcing. Can you talk about the difference between the two, and how they apply to the current COVID-19 crisis?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 23:25
Absolutely, and thank you for allowing me to do that. A lot of times people will come up and say, “We need to quit outsourcing,” and what they’re referring to is this idea that we’re shipping jobs, manufacturing, things like that offshore to some other place. So there’s two different terms we’ve got to be really careful about. So offshoring would be I’m making a product that I used to make in the US, and now make it someplace else. It is not I’m offshoring it to some other location, so I’ve allowed someone else to go ahead and do that. That is different than outsourcing, in that outsourcing could be it is taking a function or capability that I did myself, and give it to somebody else, but it doesn’t necessarily mean that it was offshored, it could be done here in the US. So why do companies outsource? It’s become because those individuals have a better capability, and infrastructure, talent, to go ahead and do that work.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 24:22
Do we want to allow outsourcing? Absolutely. Can I outsource and offshore at the same time? I certainly can. So under corona, and when you start thinking about the actions that Congress will take, and the Senate, and maybe even ourselves, we’re going to start looking and say, “Well, where did that get made? Or who made it?” So offshoring, that’s going to be our big thing. Where did it actually get made? We may not know who actually made the product, because sometimes organizations put their name on it, but it is outsourced to another party. So there’s a lot of stuff we buy that is actually done by others, it’s outsourced to them, and then we private label it, or make it … make them label it accordingly.

Jon Waterhouse: 25:07
Dr. Manrodt, how is this going to have an effect? How is COVID-19 going to have an effect on outsourcing and offshoring? Especially in the sense that people are already losing their jobs, many of these jobs might want to be brought back in-house or back into the country, how do you think that’s going to have an effect on things in the big picture?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 25:30
Well, I think this goes back unfortunately to the way that we act as consumers. A lot of times it’s going to be based on power and, “How can I go ahead and take advantage of either my suppliers, or those around me that I can get a better advantage of? Because now I know that everybody’s kind of in a weakened state, and you want my business, I’m going to go ahead, and I’ll leverage that against you.” So as far as what will happen to offshoring, I think we’re going to get less. I think that, again a lot of this is based, Jon, on the tipping point of pain that we have to kind of hit. If it gets to be bad enough, if we’re going to say, “I’m going to be willing to buy American. I don’t care of the price,” if that’s going to happen then we’re going to see a lot of offshoring or near-shoring, getting it closer to the US, maybe Brazil, South America, Canada, maybe it’s allies that we’re going to go ahead and say we’re going to buy from, or I’ll bring it all the way back in.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 26:25
Outsourcing, I think will still remain pretty active, and the reason is if I allow somebody else to do some work that I’m not that good at, I can get more efficient in what I do. So there’s many things, facility management, some parts of transportation that I will outsource to others because they’re much more effective, and efficient in doing that, and I think that’s still going to go ahead and stay strong. The offshoring, that’s going to be a bigger issue.

Jon Waterhouse: 26:51
Okay, can you tell us why?

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 26:52
Because I think under the offshoring, I think what’s going to happen is that is where we’re going to start saying, “Do we want to really allow all of our products being made elsewhere, and not in the United States? Do we really want it to be 4,000 miles away?” So when you start thinking about your supply chain, and the more nodes, and the longer you make it, the more impact or more risk can occur where problems can occur. If I have a very short supply chain, then I don’t have those issues.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 27:25
It’s like on Facebook, I think somebody was showing a picture of their grandmother, and she was in the garden, and she had a bunch of tomatoes, and it said, “Grandma knew her supply chain,” right? She just went outside, and she just picked her tomatoes, right? So that’s her supply chain. Obviously, she had to go get seeds, because she didn’t buy the plants, she bought seeds, and put them in the ground, and then she was done. So the more complex you make it the more risks you’re going to have, and somebody is going to have to bear that risk, and we are paying that premium for risk today.

Jon Waterhouse: 28:01
Wow, fascinating, fascinating stuff from Dr. Dr. Karl Manrodt from Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. You’re listening to Lenz on Business sponsored by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Don’t forget you can get your MBA Master of Logistics, or Master of Management Information Systems online, and GMAT waivers are available. Visit makeyournextmove.org, and complete the form to get started. We’ll be back with more Lenz on Business on WSB in just a few moments.

Richard Lenz: 28:38
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business, again that’s gcsu.edu/business. (Singing).

Jon Waterhouse: 29:06
You’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business, Georgia’s Public Liberal Arts University. I’m producer Jon Waterhouse, and we’ve been talking this week with Dr. Dr. Karl Manrodt, he’s a Professor of Logistics and Supply Chain Management in the Department of Management, Marketing and Logistics at Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. He’s also the Director of the Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management Program, an online Masters Program for working professionals. Dr. Manrodt has more than 25 years in the logistics, transportation, and supply chain research, and with him today we’ve been talking with one of his students, Jeremiah Griffin. Jeremiah works actually in the supply chain business as Senior Manager for Process Improvement and Supply Chain for Walmart. Jeremiah is actually in the midst of his Georgia College Masters of Logistics and Supply Chain Management online program, and you can learn more about that program at makeyournextmove.org.

Jon Waterhouse: 30:14
Now that was … let’s talk a little bit more about the program, and Jeremiah, if you can kind of tell me a little bit about why Georgia College attracted you. What lured you to this institution to receive your Master of Logistics and Supply Chain Management?

Jeremiah Griffin: 30:31
Yeah, good question, Jon, and one that I’m actually very prepared to answer. I’ve got more than 25 years in the retail industry, but about five years ago is when I moved into the supply chain portion of the business, and I’ve just … I’ve learned so much, and become so intrigued by the entire concept of supply chain end to end. And so after a few years of working in the industry I decided, “Listen, I’m going to take the opportunity to go get my graduate degree, and learn more about supply chain.” As I researched colleges and universities, Georgia College just really stood out to me in the way that they present themselves from a family perspective, working with that working class individual, like Dr. Manrodt talked about, very quick response times to any inquiries that I had, just immediately brought me into the fold and, and made me feel part of the Georgia College family.

Jeremiah Griffin: 31:29
Now that I’m now two semesters in I still believe, and they show that culture every single day. It is a cohort-based program, so I’m following the path with a group of about 40 to 45 people in my class, and I have to say, Jon, I’m developing friendships. I’m developing a much broader network of supply chain peers, and all of that is because the way that the Georgia College manages their Masters program in supply chain.

Dr. Karl Manrodt: 32:08
One of the things that Jeremiah said is really interesting, is that he developed friendships. And I have to remember when I started here at Georgia College I thought this would be like a degree you just kind of do on your own, and there wouldn’t be that level of connectivity. But Jeremiah, hearing you talk about that is really exciting, because that’s exactly what we’re trying to do and develop. So you’re not alone going through this program, it’s not just a computer screen, but you’re developing those friendships that are going to last a lifetime, and that’s super exciting.

Jon Waterhouse: 32:38
Well, thank you both, Dr. Manrodt, and Jeremiah Griffin for joining us this week, and especially tackling these timely topics. Make sure and check out our website lenzonbusiness.com, that’s L-E-N-Zonbusiness.com. And the whole shebang is brought to you by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. You can learn more at makeyournextmove.org. Well, folks, we’ll see you next time, right here on WSB for more Lenz on Business.

Richard Lenz: 33:15
Hi, this is Richard Lenz, and you’re listening to Lenz on Business presented by Georgia College’s J. Whitney Bunting College of Business. Visit them at gcsu.edu/business, again that’s gcsu.edu/business.